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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Notice given for Thursday, 10 September 2015

    *1    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         takes note of the recent reports of widespread exploitation of workers within 7-Eleven stores across Australia;

(2)         expresses concern at reports that 7-Eleven has been systematically underpaying employees, paying as little as half the minimum wage and threatening foreign workers with deportation; and

(3)         calls on the Government to grant a visa amnesty to affected workers who make underpayment complaints or make submissions to the Senate inquiry into the impact of Australia’s temporary work visa programs on the Australian labour market and on the temporary work visa holders.

              ( Notice given 9 September 2015. )

Notices —continued

       1    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Australian and Western Australian governments have caused significant distress to the Indigenous peoples by failing to carry out proper community consultation on the withdrawal of Municipal and Essential Services (MES) funding and the proposed forced closure of Aboriginal communities; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         reveal the full details of the agreements made with the states to terminate MES funding for remote Indigenous communities; and

(b)         outline what strategies it has put in place to ensure that its policy will not result in Aboriginal Australians again being forced off their land.

              ( Notice given 12 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 14 September 2015. )

       2    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That the House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         a comprehensive and strategic approach to developing Northern Australia is required to boost exports for the growing Asian market and to promote coherent agriculture development across the north;

(b)         high-impact, scientific research is needed to lower barriers to private sector investment and stimulate capital flows to the north;

(c)         a ‘build it and they will come’ approach is not a credible basis for developing Northern Australia;

(d)         the Joint Select Committee on Northern Australia recommended in its ‘Pivot North’ report that a Co-operative Research Centre for northern agriculture was necessary to promote agricultural development across the north; and

(e)         the growNORTH initiative established with state and territory governments and universities had already been significantly progressed, but was stalled last year as a result of Government inaction; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         commit to funding a collaborative research venture in Northern Australia; and

(b)         immediately release the details of the Northern Australia White Paper.

              ( Notice given 14 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       3    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         by resolution 57/129 of 11 December 2002, the General Assembly designated 29 May as the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers to:

                                                          (i)       pay tribute to all the men and women who have served and continue to serve in United Nations peacekeeping operations;

                                                        (ii)       recognise the high level of professionalism, dedication and courage of peacekeepers; and

                                                       (iii)       honour the memory of those who have lost their lives in the cause of peace;

(b)         this year’s theme is ‘A Force for Peace, a Force for Change, a Force for the Future’;

(c)         on 29 May 2015 Australia joins with other nations to commemorate United Nations workers who:

                                                          (i)       provide life-saving assistance to millions of people around the world;

                                                        (ii)       work in conflict zones and areas of natural hazards; and

                                                       (iii)       place their own lives at risk in the line of duty;

(d)         Australia has been a strong supporter of United Nations peacekeeping operations since 1947, with 65,000 personnel from Australia deployed to more than 50 United Nations and other multilateral peace and security operations since this time, and is one of the top contributors to the United Nations peacekeeping budget;

(e)         the United Nations total peacekeeping budget is US$8.47 billion, or 0.4 per cent of global military spending, indicating that building and keeping the peace is overwhelmingly cheaper than the pursuit of war;

(f)          there are currently over 125,000 military and civilian men and women from 120 countries working in 16 different United Nations missions around the world, who are not there for personal gain, rather, they are engaged in maintaining peace and security and in building the political, social and economic infrastructure required to ensure conflict zones can make the transition to peace on a sustainable and lasting basis;

(g)         since the first peacekeeping mission in 1948 more than 3,348 military, police and civilian personnel have died in service as a result of accidents and violence while striving to help those most in need in some of the world’s most hostile environments, with 41 people already having died this year; and

(h)         United Nations and other humanitarian workers are increasingly being targeted for political and ideological reasons; and

(2)         commends the vital work carried out by United Nations peacekeepers and other humanitarian workers and calls upon all United Nations member states to ensure the safety and security of United Nations peacekeepers and other humanitarian workers, and to appropriately punish perpetrators of violence against such workers.

              ( Notice given 26 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       4    Ms Hall : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         June is Bowel Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM), during which Bowel Cancer Australia seeks to raise awareness of a disease that claims the lives of 77 Australians every week;

(b)         BCAM has a positive message—saving lives through early detection—as bowel cancer is one of the most curable types of cancer if found early; and

(c)         in 2014, about 16,980 Australians were diagnosed with bowel cancer (9,250 in men and 7,730 in women), and an estimated 19,960 are expected to be diagnosed in 2020;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         bowel cancer can develop without any early warning signs;

(b)         if bowel cancer is detected before it has spread beyond the bowel there is a 90 per cent chance of surviving more than five years;

(c)         regular screening every two years for people aged 50 and over can reduce the risk of dying from bowel cancer by up to 33 per cent; and

(d)         more than 12,000 suspected or confirmed cancers will be detected through free screening, saving between 300 and 500 lives each year; and

(3)         encourages Members to continue to support efforts to raise awareness of the importance of early detection as well as the signs and symptoms of bowel cancer.

              ( Notice given 26 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       5    Mrs Griggs : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         the Government is investing in significant new capabilities for the Australian Defence Force (ADF);

(b)         these capabilities include but are not limited to the acquisition of Boeing P-8A Poseidon aircraft, Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft, 58 more Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighters and two new Boeing C-17A Globemaster III transport aircraft; and

(c)         the former Government’s cuts to Defence funding led to 119 projects being delayed, 43 degraded and 8 cancelled; and

(2)         notes the importance of providing our ADF personnel the equipment and capabilities they need to perform their roles.

              ( Notice given 16 June 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       6    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the widespread and systematic campaign of persecution towards Baha’is in Iran;

(b)         that the application of discriminatory policies against Baha’is has escalated over the last two years, with government officials blocking access to higher education, business and trade, as well as suppressing the social and cultural freedoms for those of the Baha’i faith;

(c)         the increased economic pressures placed on Baha’is through the systematic sealing of their business premises in response to businesses being closed in observance of Baha’i holy days in April and May;

(d)         that small enterprises are one of the only means of economic subsistence available to the majority of Baha’is in Iran, since they are banned from all government employment, and private sector businesses are frequently pressured to dismiss Baha’i employees;

(e)         that Baha’is continue to experience the threat of arrest and imprisonment, suffer from the incitement of hatred through government-sanctioned media, and face denial of access to higher education; and

(f)          one of the two recommendations from the 2014 Universal Periodic Review (second review) conditionally accepted by Iran was Australia’s recommendation to ‘ensure that the trials of seven Baha’is are fair and transparent and conducted in accordance with international standards, and that Iran amend all legislation that discriminates against minority groups’; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to urge the Iranian Government to:

(a)         address and improve the observance of basic human rights in Iran, including in relation to those who practise the Baha’i faith; and

(b)         implement the accepted recommendations of the Universal Periodic Review, and accept all Universal Periodic Review recommendations unconditionally.

              ( Notice given 25 June 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       7    Mr Thistlethwaite : To move—That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Australian women’s national soccer team (the Matildas) on its recent success at the World Cup in Canada for:

(a)         finishing second in Group D with a victory over Nigeria and a draw with Sweden;

(b)         winning its Round of 16 match against Brazil; and

(c)         narrowly losing to Japan 1-0 in the quarter finals;

(2)         congratulates the Australia national netball team (the Netball Diamonds) on its recent success at the World Cup in Sydney for:

(a)         finishing second in Group D with victories over Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago;

(b)         wining its qualification round matches against England, South Africa and Wales and winning its semi final match against Jamaica; and

(c)         defeating New Zealand in the final 58-55 to claim its 11th world championship title;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         the hard work and dedication of the team members and coaching staff and management of both teams; and

(b)         that women sporting champions in Australia are often poorly remunerated compared to their male counterparts; and

(4)         condemns the Government’s cuts to the ABC budget which have seen many Australian female sports such as W-League soccer and Women’s National Basketball League cut from free to air television broadcasts.

              ( Notice given 10 August 2015; amended 19 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       8    Mr Fitzgibbon : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the United Nations General Assembly has declared 2015 as the International Year of Soils (IYS);

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the IYS aims to be a platform for raising awareness of the importance of sustainable soil management as the basis for food systems, fuel and fibre production, essential ecosystem functions and better adaptation to climate change for present and future generations; and

(b)         the objectives of the IYS are to:

                                                          (i)       create awareness of the fundamental roles of soils for human life;

                                                        (ii)       achieve recognition of the prominent contributions of soils to food security, climate change adaptation and mitigation, essential ecosystem services, poverty alleviation and sustainable development;

                                                       (iii)       promote effective policies and actions for the sustainable management and protection of soil resources;

                                                      (iv)       educate decision makers about the need for robust investment in sustainable soil management activities aimed at healthy soils for different land users and population groups; and

                                                        (v)       advocate for rapid enhancement of capacities and systems for soil information collection and monitoring at all levels (global, regional and national); and

(3)         commits to promoting the importance of healthy soils and encouraging the adoption of regenerative landscape management practices throughout the year, including celebration of World Soil Day on 5 December 2015.

              ( Notice given 11 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       9    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that on Thursday 6 August 2015 Hutchison Ports Australia terminated 97 of its workers via text message and email late at night;

(2)         recognises that the termination of these employees may violate fair work laws and that the manner in which they were terminated represents disrespectful and harsh business practices that are unwelcome in Australian workplaces;

(3)         acknowledges the significant impact that this will have on the workers and their families; and

(4)         calls on the Government to amend the Fair Work Act 2009 so that the internationally recognised right to strike is protected and the Fair Work Commission is not required to issue orders against employees if their employer has acted unfairly and instigated a dispute.

              ( Notice given 11 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      10    Mr Katter : To move—That the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Amendment (Firearms and Firearm Magazines) Regulation 2015 made under the Customs Act 1901 on 6 August 2015 and presented to the House on 10 August 2015, be disallowed.

              ( Notice given 11 August 2015. Regulations will be deemed to have been disallowed unless disposed of within 6 sitting days, including today. )

    11    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest OECD Programme for International Student Assessment report shows the educational attainment of school students in regional Australia is almost one year behind city students, with remote students being almost two years behind;

(b)         country students are less likely to complete year 12 and continue to post school education than their city peers;

(c)         fewer students in regional, rural and remote Australia meet the NAPLAN national minimum standards; and

(d)         the Gonski review found that students in regional, rural and remote Australia are more likely to be disadvantaged or vulnerable;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the additional cost of providing schooling in regional, rural and remote locations;

(b)         that the Gonski reforms were set to deliver the resources needed to improve results in regional, rural and remote schools, through needs based funding for small schools and school location; and

(c)         that regional, rural and remote schools were set to be some of the biggest beneficiaries of the Gonski reforms, with almost 40 per cent of the additional funding benefiting country schools;

(3)         calls on all Members representing regional, rural and remote communities to:

(a)         hold the Government to account for its broken promise that there would be ‘no cuts to education’;

(b)         speak out in the Parliament and their communities against the Government’s school cuts; and

(c)         demand that students in regional, rural and remote Australia have access to the same opportunities as their city peers; and

(4)         calls upon the Government to:

(a)         acknowledge that students in regional, rural and remote Australia deserve the same educational opportunities as city students;

(b)         reverse its cuts to schools; and

(c)         honour the Gonski agreements.

              ( Notice given 18 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    12    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government’s recent changes to the income test treatment of defined benefit superannuation streams:

(a)         will have an adverse effect on nearly 48,000 part pension recipients;

(b)         do not give affected people enough time to make other financial arrangements; and

(c)         are the latest in a series of adverse changes to retirement incomes contained in the 2014-15 and 2015-16 budgets; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reverse its decision to place a cap on the amount of income from defined benefit superannuation schemes that can be excluded from the Age Pension income test or, at the very least, delay the commencement of these measures to 1 January 2017 at the earliest.

              ( Notice given 18 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    13    Ms O’Neil : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the critical role that women have played in advancing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in Australia;

(2)         notes that despite this, women remain largely underrepresented in STEM disciplines in Australia’s schools and universities;

(3)         recognises the social and economic benefits of advancing men and women equally through STEM;

(4)         supports the need to encourage girls to take an interest in STEM from an early age through greater exposure to, and advancement of, science disciplines in school; and

(5)         encourages policies that will enable women and girls to fully realise their potential through STEM at school and university.

              ( Notice given 18 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    14    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there is considerable evidence that payday lending and consumer leases are not properly regulated and that both financial practices are causing serious harm to low income Australians;

(b)         irresponsible and immoral lending is endemic in the payday lending industry, which is growing rapidly and developing new online opportunities to encourage people to borrow with insufficient consideration of their capacity to bear the exorbitant and poorly regulated interest costs that payday lending involves;

(c)         the Australian Securities and Investment Commission review of payday lending found that 24 per cent of loans were taken out by Centrelink customers and 54 per cent were taken out by customers who had two or more payday loans in the previous 90 days, a clear indication that they are caught in a cycle of repeat borrowing;

(d)         consumer leases can involve an effective annualised interest rate of 240 per cent, and generally mean that vulnerable consumers pay three or four times the value of basic household items like refrigerators or washing machines;

(e)         consumer leases operate with lower consumer protection standards under the National Credit Code, though such agreements are not materially different in effect from credit contracts;

(f)          in 2013-14 nearly half of Radio Rentals’ $197 million revenue was received through the Centrepay system which allows payments to be directly debited from a consumer’s Centrelink account; and

(g)         Senator Cameron has brought a Private Senators’ Bill that seeks to remove consumer leases from access to the Centrepay system; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure that the recently announced review into the 2013 reforms to payday lending focuses on securing the wellbeing and protection of low income Australians irrespective of the effect this has on the profits of companies that practice this kind of often predatory lending;

(b)         act quickly to stop consumer leases being used to prey on vulnerable and low income Australian households by ensuring that consumer leases are subject to the same standards and controls as credit contracts, and by introducing stricter controls on the currently outrageous and indefensible costs involved in such arrangements, including the requirement to prominently disclose the total cost of all contracts; and

(c)         support Senator Cameron’s initiative in removing access to Centrepay for consumer lease companies and amend section 123TC of the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999 to include a definition of consumer leases for this purpose.

              ( Notice given on 18 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    15    Mr Champion : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of rural and regional newspapers in providing a vital service to the towns and regional communities they cover; and

(b)         that maintaining a viable rural and regional press is in the interest of regional communities; and

(2)         recommends that the Government:

(a)         considers reviewing the amount of government advertising in regional papers;

(b)         recognises the significance of its decisions regarding government advertising and the impact that these decisions can have on regional publications; and

(c)         stops discriminating against newspapers which service rural and regional areas through its changes to government advertising.

              ( Notice given 20 August 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    16    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         that the productivity, sustainability and liveability of our cities face emerging pressures relating to urban growth as Australia continues to transform into a knowledge intensive economy;

(b)         that the agglomerative effects of this are already being felt keenly in our capital cities, which suffer from traffic congestion and an unprecedented growth in house prices;

(c)         that new technologies:

                                                          (i)       have ensured our communities are more connected and more engaged than ever before; and

                                                        (ii)       provide critical opportunities for city leaders to foster entrepreneurship and innovation;

(d)         the benefits of attracting the next generation of start-ups while using new ways to promote small local businesses on a national and international stage, and the consequent uplift in productivity for our cities in regional and urban areas;

(2)         congratulates Parramatta City Council and the Future Cities Collaborative on their announcement that they will host a city leaders summit on Smart Cities for the Greater Sydney Metropolitan Area on 10 November 2015; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         re-establish the Major Cities Unit;

(b)         encourage the development of second and third central business districts in our capital cities and support opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship;

(c)         through COAG, develop policy levers to help create the best set of conditions for innovation to flourish, looking at best practice models from around the world;

(d)         assess ways to ensure regulations keep up to date with new ideas and technologies;

(e)         work with city leaders to ensure the promotion and support of local small businesses; and

(f)          recognise the emergence of Smart Cities globally and the contribution they can make to cities in regional and urban areas around Australia.

              ( Notice given 7 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    17    Mr S. P. Jones : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         crystal methamphetamine or ‘ice’ is tearing apart vulnerable communities across Australia;

(b)         the head of the National Ice Taskforce and former Victorian Police Commissioner, Mr Ken Lay, has noted that rural communities want the focus of an ice strategy to be on primary prevention and harm reduction; and

(c)         the Minister for Justice has repeatedly said that we cannot ‘arrest our way out’ of the problem of ice use;

(2)         recognises that Western Australia—the state with the nation’s highest rate of amphetamine use—is struggling to contain the effects of this harmful drug and as a result:

(a)         police statistics show Armadale has one of the highest crime rates in the Perth metropolitan area with 571 assaults and 377 home burglaries in the year to June; and

(b)         treatment services in the electoral division of Canning including Hope Community Services and the Palmerston Association are under significant pressure, particularly given ongoing funding uncertainty caused by the Government’s budget cuts and mishandling of the sector’s future direction;

(3)         acknowledges that the Western Australian Government has no plan to address ice and that the Premier should have been working with the Australian Government to tackle ice-related crime and health issues resulting from abuse of the drug;

(4)         matches Labor’s commitment to provide $3.2 million to assist communities in the electoral division of Canning to combat ice use, including:

(a)         providing $200,000 to install new closed circuit television cameras in crime hot spots in Armadale and Mandurah;

(b)         ensuring access to illicit drug and alcohol rehabilitation, treatment and prevention services by providing $2.7 million to the Palmerston Association and Hope Community Services to guarantee funding for these services to 2019; and

(c)         investing $270,000 in the Peel Community Legal Services which offers support for women and children escaping domestic and family violence, recognising the impact of alcohol and drug related violence in the community;

(5)         reverses $800 million in budget cuts to the Department of Health’s flexible funds, which includes the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvement Grants Fund and Substance Misuse Service Delivery Grants Fund, as these funds support alcohol and illicit drug treatment, rehabilitation and prevention services;

(6)         provides certainty and security for workers in treatment services on the frontline by extending funding under the Non Government Organisation Treatment Grants Program beyond 2015-16; and

(7)         releases the Department of Health’s review of drug and alcohol prevention and treatment in Australia, which was handed to the Government 7 July 2014.

              ( Notice given 7 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    18    Mr S. P. Jones : To move—That this House calls on the Government to:

(1)         acknowledge that the impending loss of 500 jobs from the steelworks in Port Kembla will hurt the economic security of a region which already has unemployment numbers at two per cent above the national average;

(2)         recognise that Australia should be a country that continues to make things and that steel making is vital to the future of the Illawarra and other regions including Whyalla in South Australia;

(3)         properly resource the Anti-Dumping Commission so that it can get on with the job of identifying and prosecuting cases of dumping, including subsidised steel;

(4)         promise not to repeal or weaken the Australian Jobs Act 2013 so that Australian workers are given a fair chance when job vacancies arise;

(5)         reinstate the Local Employment Coordinator in the Illawarra so that workers who lose their jobs at the steelworks in Port Kembla and elsewhere can retrain and find alternative employment;

(6)         locate entrepreneur advisers in the Illawarra to help local businesses in improving their competitiveness and allow retrenched workers and contractors from the steelworks to qualify for higher level job seeker assistance; and

(7)         support the #IllawarraDigital strategy and facilitate a Digital Enterprise programme so that small to medium businesses and young entrepreneurs can train and seek advice on taking advantage of high speed broadband.

              ( Notice given 8 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

    19    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         in the previous Parliament (31 May 2012), on the motion of the Member for Denison, the House resolved to:

                                                          (i)       acknowledge the large number of mothers and fathers with serious grievances with family law and the child support system;

                                                        (ii)       note that there had not been a comprehensive review of the child support system since the 2005 report In the Best Interests of Children—Reforming the Child Support Scheme ;

                                                       (iii)       call on the Government to undertake a comprehensive review of family law and the child support system; and

                                                      (iv)       recommend that the terms of reference of this review be formulated to ensure that the safety and wellbeing of children is paramount;

(b)         the Member for Denison gave notice of a further motion of this nature this Parliament (26 February 2015); and

(c)         a review has not taken place;

(2)         notes that, although the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs in this Parliament conducted an inquiry into the Child Support Program (CSP), it was not an holistic and detailed review of both child support and family law; and

(3)         calls on the Government to honour the will of the previous Parliament and commission a comprehensive root and branch review of family law and the CSP with sufficient mandate to effectively consider the interaction between these systems.

              ( Notice given 8 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

Orders of the day

         1    Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment (Regional Australia Statements) Bill 2015 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

         2    Melanoma: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Tehan —That this House notes that:

(1)         Melanoma March takes place this month and will involve hundreds of Australians around the country participating in community walks to raise awareness of melanoma;

(2)         12,500 Australians are diagnosed with melanoma each year and 1,650 of those are diagnosed with advanced melanoma;

(3)         advanced melanoma kills more than 1,500 Australians each year—this is one death every six hours;

(4)         melanoma is:

(a)         the most common cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 39 and those diagnosed with advanced melanoma have a median survival of only 8 to 9 months;

(b)         estimated to be the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian males in 2014 (7,440 cases), after prostate and colorectal cancer; and

(c)         also estimated to be the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian females (5,210 cases), after breast and colorectal cancer; and

(5)         advanced melanoma costs hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

         3    Cyclone Pam: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the devastation caused by Cyclone Pam on the people of Vanuatu, Tuvalu and Kiribati;

(2)         recognises the enormous destructive force of Cyclone Pam and notes the loss of life and destruction caused including:

(a)         damage to 90 per cent of Port Vila homes and entire villages across the archipelago;

(b)         displacement of 45 per cent of Tuvalu’s population and significant destruction of the outer islands of Tuvalu; and

(c)         severe damage on three of Kiribati’s southern islands:

(3)         recognises the:

(a)         enormous effort that will be required by governments and non-government emergency teams to find those missing from the disaster; and

(b)         huge task now facing our friends in the Pacific to rebuild and repair following the devastation of Cyclone Pam;

(4)         acknowledges the international effort to provide assistance to Vanuatu; and

(5)         calls on the Australian Government to monitor the situation closely and to work with the governments of Vanuatu, Tuvalu and Kiribati to provide timely and appropriate further assistance as needed.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

         4    Shingles and postherpetic neuralgia: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         recognises that shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) can cause significant and debilitating pain for hundreds of thousands of Australians;

(2)         acknowledges that senior Australians unfortunately bear the brunt of the disease burden, as the frequency and severity of complications increase with age;

(3)         notes that approximately 1 in 3 adults will develop shingles in their lifetime and that the risk of shingles increases with age, particularly after the age of 60;

(4)         recognises there is no cure for shingles and PHN;

(5)         understands that prevention through vaccination represents the most effective opportunity to help reduce the number of Australians suffering from shingles and PHN; and

(6)         acknowledges that preventative health measures such as vaccination will help protect the health of older Australians and safeguard their ability to work, care and volunteer.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         5    Death penalty: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Parke —That the House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the execution in Indonesia by firing squad on 29 April 2015 of Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, along with their fellow prisoners, Rodrigo Gularte, Silvester Nwolise, Okwuduli Oyatanze, Raheem Salami, Martin Anderson and Zainal Abidin, and expresses condolences to their families;

(b)         the bipartisan commitment in Australia to see an end to the death penalty worldwide;

(c)         that the evidence overwhelmingly shows that the death penalty is not a more effective deterrent than long term imprisonment;

(d)         that the international trend is clearly away from the practice of the death penalty—in 1977 only 16 countries had abolished the death penalty, now 140 nations have banned the practice; and

(e)         that Australia has the opportunity to influence further progress towards the worldwide abolition of the death penalty in its relationship with key regional and global partners; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         strengthen its efforts to advocate for an end to the death penalty wherever it still occurs; and

(b)         ensure that Australia’s international cooperation is structured to avoid to the extent possible, the potential that such cooperation could lead to a person receiving the death penalty.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         6    Foreign Death Penalty Offences (Preventing Information Disclosure) Bill 2015 ( Mr Palmer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         7    Iron Ore Supply and Demand (Commission of Inquiry) Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         8    Unemployment: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Conroy —That the House:

(1)         recognises that alongside national defence, there is no higher obligation on a Commonwealth government than to support and promote the employment prospects of its citizens;

(2)         condemns the record of the Government which has seen:

(a)         an unemployment rate at a 12 year high;

(b)         more than 81,000 Australians added to the unemployment queue since the election of the Government;

(c)         a record underemployment rate of 8.6 per cent;

(d)         a youth unemployment rate of over 15 per cent;

(e)         190,000 people long term unemployed, more than any time since records began; and

(f)          one in four unemployed people being long term unemployed;

(3)         recognises that while support for small businesses is important to stimulating jobs growth, more is needed; and

(4)         calls on the Government to invest more in education, training, industry and innovation policies to rectify this jobs crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         9    United Nations Charter—70th Anniversary: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Dr Stone —That this House:

(l)      recognises 26 June 2015 as the 70th anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Charter (Charter) at San Francisco;

(2)    notes that:

(a)     Australia was one of the 50 nations which signed the Charter that established the United Nations organisation;

(b)     the United Nations came into being on 24 October 1945, a date that is recognised each year as United Nations Day; and

(c)     the signatories to the Charter agreed to:

(i)      save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice in our lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind;

(ii)     reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small;

(iii)    establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained;

(iv)   promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom; and

(v)    achieve these ends, to:

-     practise tolerance and live together in peace with one another as good neighbours;

-     unite our strength to maintain international peace and security;

-     ensure, by the acceptance of principles and the institution of methods, that armed force shall not be used, save in the common interest; and

-     employ international machinery for the promotion of the economic and social advancement of all peoples; and

(3)    calls on all Members and Senators in the Australian Parliament to celebrate the achievements of the United Nations over the last 70 years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      10    Racial Discrimination Act 1975 : Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the 40th anniversary of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 which was passed in implementation of our international obligations under the International Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; and

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         important role the Act plays in Australia’s Human Rights Framework;

(b)         importance of Section 18C of the Act in protecting Australians from racist hate speech; and

(c)         important role the Human Rights Commission plays in administering the Act.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      11    Dividend imputation: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Smith —That this House:

(1)         notes that 1 July 2015 marks the 28th anniversary of the introduction of dividend imputation in Australia;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         the system of dividend imputation introduced by the Labor Government in the 34th Parliament has been maintained and supported by every Government since;

(b)         the system of refunding excess imputation credits for the benefit of low income earners and charities, which was introduced by the Coalition Government in the 39th Parliament, has been maintained and supported by every Government since;

(c)         dividend imputation has delivered improved operation of Australia’s capital markets and corporate landscape;

(d)         the end of double taxation of profits has delivered increased prosperity to everyday Australians who own shares either directly, or through indirect means such as superannuation; and

(e)         dividend imputation has encouraged increased share ownership levels throughout the Australian community;

(3)         endorses and lends ongoing support to dividend imputation; and

(4)         rejects calls to tamper with or discard dividend imputation and reintroduce any double taxation of dividends. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      12    Netball: Resumption of debate ( from  11 August 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House:

(1)         places on record that the:

(a)         recently completed 2015 ANZ Championship has taken on new importance on the Australian sporting calendar;

(b)         ANZ Championship cross Tasman competition has been significant in increasing the profile of the sport through live television coverage and internet streaming; and

(c)         Netball World Cup is happening in Sydney throughout August, involving 16 international teams in 64 matches over 10 days at Sydney Olympic Park; and

(2)         congratulates:

(a)         the Australian Diamond players, coaching and medical staff on their preparation and performance in this tournament;

(b)         the Trans Tasman Netball League for the innovations they have delivered to netball;

(c)         the International Netball Federation; and

(d)         Netball Australia for its impact in boosting the profile of women in sport, providing its members with valuable leadership skills and supporting world class athletes.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      13    Small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  11 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         96 per cent of all of Australian businesses are small businesses, employing more than 4.5 million people and producing more than $330 billion of the nation’s economic output;

(b)         in 2013-14 Australians started more than 280,000 small businesses;

(c)         the Coalition Government has developed and started to deliver as part of the budget, the largest small business package in the nation’s history—the Jobs and Small Business Package—worth $5.5 billion; and

(d)         as part of the Jobs and Small Business Package, all small businesses will get an immediate tax deduction for each asset they buy costing less than $20,000; and

(2)         acknowledges the work of the Prime Minister, the Treasurer and the Minister for Small Business in putting together a package that will deliver for small businesses now and into the future.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      14    Gastroenterological disorders: Resumption of debate ( from  11 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         chronic gastroenterological disorders affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of Australians;

(b)         inflammatory bowel diseases affect 61,000 people, including 28,000 suffering from Crohn’s disease and 33,000 with ulcerative colitis;

(c)         inflammatory bowel disease often develops between the ages of 15 and 30, but it can start at any age; increasingly it is being seen in children;

(d)         it is estimated that 120,000 Australians have the functional gut motility disorder gastroparesis; and

(e)         gastroenterological disorders require urgent attention; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         address funding to patient support, medical research and treatment in gastroenterological disorders; and

(b)         consider the call by the University of Western Sydney to establish an Australian Translational Gastroenterology Centre to:

                                                          (i)       facilitate community awareness of gastroenterological disorders across Australia through community workshops, seminars and symposiums;

                                                        (ii)       promote support for gastrointestinal disorders at hospitals and primary health networks across Australia;

                                                       (iii)       develop a gut tissue bank for research;

                                                      (iv)       initiate and maintain a patient registry of gastrointestinal disorders; and

                                                        (v)       support local strategies to enhance treatment of gastrointestinal disorders in rural and remote areas and in Indigenous populations. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      15    Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group Report: Resumption of debate ( from  11 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Nikolic —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the release of the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group (Advisory Group) report, ‘Action Now: Classroom Ready Teachers’ on 13 February 2015;

(b)         that the Advisory Group, comprised of eight educational experts, was established in 2014 to provide the best possible informed advice and guidance on how teacher education could be improved to better prepare new teachers for the classroom;

(c)         that the credentials, expertise and contribution of the Advisory Group was of world class quality;

(d)         that the Advisory Group conducted its review with consistent impartiality, dedication and objectivity, to the benefit of all Australians;

(e)         the critical contribution made by this report to optimising teacher development for all Australian schools of the 21st century; and

(f)          the truly comprehensive and wide ranging nature of the Advisory Group’s investigation and subsequent report;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         this report is both far ranging and innovative and includes a total of 38 key recommendations;

(b)         the recommendations have at their core a central unifying element and thread—the educational interests of children, first, foremost and always;

(c)         current and new teachers should also welcome this report, which will further enable and support both individual teachers and school communities as a whole, in both the foreseeable future, and over the longer term;

(d)         overall, this report will affect constructively, the lives of a majority of Australians, including most particularly teachers, parents and students;

(e)         the impact of this report will be impartial in nature, being blind to both the demographic and economic circumstances of teachers, parents and students, alike;

(f)          this report:

                                                          (i)       is underpinned by both balance and merit, for example, it readily acknowledges the existence of both current high performing teacher performance and contribution, as well as identifying the need and scope for other performance to be significantly improved, together with a range of mechanisms and strategies to achieve this key objective; and

                                                        (ii)       will act to further affirm the significance and centrality of school education within Australian society;

(g)         by improving overall teacher performance, this report will likely support the retention of more students at school for longer, including most desirably, the completion of year 12 by as many students as possible; and

(h)         this report:

                                                          (i)       will exert a long term and positive impact on current and future Australian workplaces and work performance; and

                                                        (ii)       signals the intended ongoing future emphasis which the Government will continue to give to education and education related matters, for the benefit of all Australians, in an increasingly competitive region and world; and

(3)         calls on the Parliament to endorse the Government’s strong response to implementing this report as both a key milestone and critical policy initiative in shaping Australian school education and performance (for both teachers and students) for the early 2lst century.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      16    MV YWAM PNG : Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the MV YWAM PNG was commissioned by Papua New Guinea Prime Minister, the Hon. Peter O’Neill MP, on 21 April 2015;

(2)         notes that the ship has been tasked with providing health care and medical training to remote coastal villages in Western Province and Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea;

(3)         understands that the new ship will allow Youth with a Mission Medical Ships Australia (YWAM MSA) to reach more villages and to deliver more timely treatment in a more appropriate clinical setting;

(4)         recognises the tireless efforts of YWAM MSA to raise awareness of the need for funds to support the work of the ship and its crew of volunteers; and

(5)         notes that the Australian Government has contributed funding of $2 million over four years towards this worthy project.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

      17    Australian Hearing Awareness Week: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House notes that:

(1)         Australian Hearing Awareness Week runs from 23 to 29 August 2015;

(2)         Australia has world class hearing services including those which have been delivered through Australian Hearing since it was established to assist returning Diggers in 1947;

(3)         hearing loss currently affects one in six Australians and is predicted to affect one in four Australians by 2050; and

(4)         events will be held all around the country to raise awareness of hearing issues including the Australian Hearing Hub Open House which will be held at Macquarie University on 22 August 2015 in the lead up to the Australian Hearing Awareness Week. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

      18    Australian Defence Force personnel serving overseas: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges and supports the deployed Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel currently serving overseas;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         there are currently well over 2,000 ADF personnel serving overseas; and

(b)         these men and women are playing a critical role in supporting Australia’s national interests by contributing to international security operations; and

(3)         notes the Government’s ongoing support for our deployed ADF personnel and the $910.7 million provided in the 2015 budget to support major overseas operations including Okra, Highroad, Manitou, Accordion and Resolute.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

      19    National Stroke Week: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs McNamara —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         National Stroke Week:

                                                          (i)       will run this year from 14 to 20 September; and

                                                        (ii)       is about raising awareness to prevent stroke in Australia; and

(b)         the National Stroke Foundation encourages all Australians to:

                                                          (i)       be aware of what stroke is, how to recognise a stroke and what to do;

                                                        (ii)       live healthy to reduce the risk of stroke; and

                                                       (iii)       get a regular health check;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         launch in June 2015, by the Minister for Health, of the Acute Stroke Clinical Care Standard; and

(b)         bi-partisan work done by past governments in the area of stroke; and

(3)         notes the requirement for greater awareness and promotion of the prevention of stroke within the Australian community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

      20    National Broadband Network: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House:

(1)         places on the record that:

(a)         the National Broadband Network (NBN) is rolling out too slowly under the current Government, and there are many difficulties being faced by constituents who are trying to access and connect to the NBN;

(b)         areas without the NBN are facing significant obstacles in accessing internet services, including ADSL and wireless;

(c)         Australians are being left in the dark by this Government about when they will have access to the NBN, with some areas being removed from the NBN roll out map without explanation and with no information forthcoming; and

(d)         the Government’s second rate NBN will not be sufficient to meet future demand, and will need to be upgraded in the future at great cost; and

(2)         recognises that access to the NBN is a necessity for all Australian businesses, students and individuals, and Australians deserve better than a second rate NBN.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

      21    Tourism and small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the Northern Australians working within the tourism industry, which plays a vital role in supporting the Northern Australian economy;

(2)         recognises that tourist spending provides further opportunities for local small businesses within the community; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is investing in small businesses through its Jobs and Small Business Package released in the 2015 budget; and

(b)         this package provides small businesses, including most businesses within the tourism industry, with much needed assistance to grow and create jobs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015 )

 

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Its determinations for the next sitting Monday are shown under ‘Business accorded priority for…’. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).