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COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS

Orders of the day

1   Corporations and Financial Services—Parliamentary Joint Committee—REPORT—Shareholder engagement and participation—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 June 2008 ) on the motion of Mr Ripoll—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 February 2009. )

2   Treaties—Joint Standing Committee—REPORT no 94 incorporating a dissenting report: treaties tabled on 14 may 2008—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 September 2008 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

3   Treaties—Joint Standing Committee—REPORT no 95: treaties tabled on 4 june, 17 june, 25 june and 26 august 2008—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 October 2008 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

4   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT—the review of the reserve bank of australia annual report 2007 (second report)—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

5   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT—competition in the banking and non-banking sectors—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 27 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

 
 
 

BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY—MAIN COMMITTEE

MONDAY, 9 FEBRUARY 2009 (6.55 TO 8.30 PM)

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices

1   Mrs Moylan: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 20 December 2006 a landmark decision was made by the United Nations General Assembly to ado pt Resolution 61/225;

(b) the Resolution recognised the risks that diabetes and its complications pose to families, Member States and world health and was adopted by consensus;

(c) the Resolution declared 14 November as World Diabetes Day;

(d) this resolution joins HIV/Aids and Autism as the only diseases having their own resolutions and declared days of observation;

(e) an estimated 246 million people worldwide, in the age range from 20 to 79 years, have diabetes and this number is expected to grow by 44 per cent, reaching 380 million by 2025;

(f) each year 3.8 million adults die from diabetes related illnesses, representing one death every 10 seconds;

(g) an estimated 7.4 per cent of the Australian population has diabetes according to an AusDiab study in 2000; and

(h) according to an AusDiab study, in 2002 the social and medical costs of diabetes in Australia were estimated to total $6 billion annually;

(2) acknowledges the work of Professor Martin Silink AM MD FRACP, as President of the Internation al Diabetes Federation and his colleagues world-wide for their work to ensure that this United Resolution was carried;

(3) recognises that:

(a) in the catalogue of chronic illness, few conditions would be more needful of attention than the scourge of di abetes;

(b) the prevention and management of diabetes are the responsibility of the whole of society;

(c) parliaments should play a leading role in promoting community education and implementing effective policies and health-care for sufferers of this world-wide scourge;

(d) left undiagnosed and untreated, diabetes dramatically affects quality of life and shortens life span and its malevolent course inevitably leads to many serious associated health complications including heart disease, stroke, renal failure, limb amputation and blindness; and

(e) unless national governments act to deliver comprehensive policies, the implications for health budgets will be calamitous; and

(4) calls on the Government to:

(a) continue to make diabetes a National Health Priority;

(b) commission a Productivity Commission Report into the real and increasing cost of diabetes to the community;

(c) adequately fund best practice medicine for the treatment of diabetes; and

(d) continue to promote healthy lifestyle programs, especially targeted to children and young people. ( Notice given 23 October 2008. Time allowed—25 minutes. )

2   Mrs D'Ath: To move—That the House:

(1) congratulates the Rudd Gov ernment on the delivery of Round Two of the computers in schools program which will provide 141,600 new computers to 1,394 secondary schools across Australia, worth more than $141 million;

(2) notes that the Rudd Government has already invested $116.82 mi llion for computers in schools during Round One in 2008 and that this latest round will bring the ratio of computers to students to 1:2 for all students in years 9 to 12 in those secondary schools who applied for and were granted computers;

(3) notes that the Petrie electorate will receive 1,267 new computers and $1.273 million in funding to the schools in the Petrie electorate in Round Two, in addition to the computers provided in Round One;

(4) acknowledges the ongoing commitment of the Rudd Government to achieve a 1:1 computer to student ratio for all Year 9 to 12 students across the country by 2011;

(5) recognises that:

(a) the future of this country lies within our young people and that as a government, we must invest in our schools to invest in our future;

(b) the commitment made by the Rudd Government through the COAG Agreement to deliver a further $807 million for legitimate costs to install and maintain the computers and costs associated with subsequent rounds; and

(6) congratulates the Rudd Government for delivering on its Education Revolution and the commitment we made to the Australian people in 2007. ( Notice given 3 February 2009. Time allowed—20 minutes. )

3   Mr Coulton: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that children living in isolated regions of Australia face unique challenges when trying to access educational services; and

(2) calls on the Government to provide the additional a ssistance and support that would enable isolated children and students to access a full range of educational services from early childhood to tertiary education. ( Notice given 27 November 2008. Time allowed—25 minutes. )

4   Mr Raguse: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises the importance of National Adoption Awareness Week and the significance of encouraging adoptees, adoptive parents and biological parents to opening and conti nuing the dialogue on adoption in Australia and encouraging people to discuss how adoption has impacted on their lives; and

(2) calls on the governments at the State and Federal levels to support all participants in the adoption process. ( Notice given 10 November 2008. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ Business time prior to 8.30 p.m. )

 
 
 

BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY—HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CHAMBER

MONDAY, 9 FEBRUARY 2009 (8.40 TO 9.30 PM)

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS continued

Presentation and statements

1   Intelligence and Security—Parliamentary Joint Committee: Report—Review of the re-listing of Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), Jamait ul-Ansar (JuA) and Al-Qa’ida in Iraq (AQI). ( Statements to conclude by 8.50 p.m. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices

1   Ms Ley: To move—That the House:

(1) supports long term viability of regional and rural medical practices, hospitals and services;

(2) notes with concern the failure of state governments t o provide adequate health services for Australians living in regional, rural and remote areas, particularly in relation to cross border health;

(3) acknowledges the Royal Flying Doctor Service and the significant contribution it makes by providing aeromedical emergency and primary health care services to people who live, work and travel in regional and remote Australia;

(4) calls on the Australian Government to eliminate inequality in healthcare access and services experienced by those living in rural and remote areas by:

(a) increasing the recruitment and retention of rural medical practitioners and health care professionals;

(b) assisting Australians who live in regional, rural and remote areas with the cost of travel to specialist medical appointments in capital cities and regional centres; and

(c) providing adequate funding to maintain and expand small rural hospitals and health services and their maternity and other procedural services. ( Notice given 10 November 2008. Time allowed—20 minutes. )

2   Mr Clare: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises the heightened importance of financial literacy and financial counselling given the global economic recession and its impact on the Australian economy;

(2) supports the actions the Government has taken to improve financial literacy and provide additional financial counselling services for people struggling to make ends meet; and

(3) calls on Australian banks and financial instit utions to assist Australian families by providing additional support for financial literacy programs and financial counselling. ( Notice given 3 February 2009. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ Business time prior to 9.30 p.m. )

 

 
 
 

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS continued

Notice given for Thursday 5 February 2009

*1   Mr Forrest: To move—That the House:

( 1) recognises the stateless circumstances of the Akha people of South East Asia occupying the remote mountain regions of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and China;

(2) accepts that:

(a) a long five century history of manipulation and persecution endured by the Akha people has left them disadvantaged, disenfranchised and virtually voiceless; and

(b) the Akha people are fighting critical health outcomes through dep ressed economic circumstances and the utilisation of inefficient agricultural practices and that this situation leaves them as one of the most vulnerable nation groups anywhere in the world; and

(3) calls on:

(a) the United Nations to do more to prevent the persecution of this people group by the oppressive Myanmar regime which is forcing many Akha families to flee across the border to Thailand;

(b) the governments of Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and China to do more for this unique people group in their respective countries to assist them towards self determination; and

(c) AusAid to recognise the needs of this unique language group and fund sustainable agricultural aid programs to assist Akha people in growing good food to break the cycle of hunger and depression. ( Notice given 4 February 2009. )

Notices —continued

2   Mr Broadbent: To move—That the House:

(1) notes the release by the Victorian Government of details of its Environm ental Effects Statement (EES) in relation to the proposed construction of a major water desalination plant at Wonthaggi, in the electorate of McMillan;

(2) recognises that:

(a) there has been considerable community opposition to the project on the ground s of its cost, the need for such a development, the lack of consultation with the local community and the serious threat to the coastal and marine environment;

(b) the operation of the plant will require considerable electric power, adding to greenhouse fas emissions;

(c) the proposed connection of the plant to the Victorian power grid will have a serious impact on properties along the route of the necessary power lines; and

(d) local government, community groups and individual objectors have not been given a reasonable period to respond to 80 technical reports that form the basis of the EES; and

(3) calls on the Australian Government to:

(a) withhold approval for the project as required under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 until such time as the Victorian Government’s EES can be independently tested; and

(b) withhold any federal funding for the project until the Australian Government has made its own assessment of the environmental and economic viability of the project. ( Notice given 28 August 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 9 February 2009. )

3   Mr Hayes: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a)  three young Australians, members of the group colloquially known as the ‘Bali 9’ arrested in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia, remain in the Death Tower at Kerobokan Prison Bali under the sentence of death by firing squad;

(b) these Australians have not yet taken review proceedings or sought clemency from the Indonesian President to commute their death sentence;

(c) one of these three is Scott Rush, a drug mule who was only 19 when arrested, is now the only drug mule still facing the death penalty and whose judgement imposing the death sentence contained almost no comparative analysis with other accused persons;

(d) the right to life is a fundamental human right recognised in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights (1966);

(e) Australia is also a party to the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights aimed at the universal abolition of the death penalty;

(f) both Australia and Indonesia are signatories to the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights ;

(g) the Australian Parliament passed the Death Penalty Abolition Act 1973 without dissent;

(h) Article 28 A of the Indonesian Constitution recognises the right to life;

(i) respect for human life and human dignity are values common to Australia and Indonesia;

(j)  abhorrence of the death penalty is a fundamental value in Australian society and there is bipartisan opposition within the Australian Parliament to the death penalty; and

(k) the Indonesian Constitutional Court recommended in October 2007 that Indonesian criminal law be amended to include a provision which allows for the death penalty not to be mandatory and for prisoners to earn a commutation of a death sentence by rehabilitation and remorse for their crime;

(2)  believes that abolition of the death penalty contributes to the enhancement of human dignity and progressive development of human rights;

(3) is convinced that all measures for abolition of the death penalty should be considered as important and essential progress in the enjoyment of the right to life;

(4) records:

(a) its opposition to the imposition of the death penalty;

(b) its abhorrence of all drug related crime;

(c) the importance of close cooperation between Australian and Indonesian law enforcement agencies in the prevention, dete ction and prosecution of drug related crime; and

(d) the importance to Australia of its continuing excellent relationship with our near neighbour, the Republic of Indonesia; and

(5) requests that:

(a) the House incorporate into domestic law the contents of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covent of Civil and Political Rights to ensure the unequivocal abolition of the death penalty in Australia and to communicate Australia’s position on the death penalty to the world at large;

(b) the Commonwealth advocate clemency for these three Australian citizens, as and whenever appropriate;

(c) the Indonesian Government favourably consider the Constitutional Court’s second recommendation that Indonesian criminal law be reformed so that there is a sentencing alternative to the mandatory death penalty;

(d) the President and the people of Indonesia understand Australia’s principled position in relation to the imposition of the death penalty; and

(e) in the event that remaining legal process fails, the President of Indonesia extend clemency to the three young Australian citizens sentenced to death, in particular, by commuting their sentences to terms of imprisonment. ( Notice given 22 September 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

4   Mr Georganas: To move—That the House commend the Australian Government for its initiatives in increasing the:

(1) proportion of water within the Murray-Darling Basin reserved for environmental purposes through the purchase of water licences; and

(2) volume of water within metropolitan and other areas for domestic, public and industrial uses through the ca pturing, storing and recycling of storm and waste water. ( Notice given 23 September 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

5   Ms Campbell: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises:

(a) that there are more than one billion of our fellow human beings suffering from the effects of extreme poverty; and

(b) the commitment of the Federal Governm ent to increase foreign aid to 0.5 per cent of Gross National Income (GNI) by 2015;

(2) acknowledges that this increase still falls short of the target of 0.7 per cent of GNI as set out by the United Nations General Assembly in 1970;

(3) commends the eff orts of the Micah Challenge in raising issues surrounding extreme poverty, particularly in Australia’s region of the world; and

(4) reaffirms the Government’s commitment to the Millennium Development Goals. ( Notice given 14 October 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

6   Mr C. R. Thomson: To move—That the House welcomes the Government’s national building infrastructure policies to deal with the global financial crisis and specifically notes its investment in outer metropolitan transport. ( Notice given 14 October 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

7   Mr Ripoll: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) in our capital cities, most trips involve stop-start driving or short trips with around 50 per cent of trips being l ess than 5 kilometres;

(b) three hundred grams of greenhouse gas emissions are saved per kilometre for every vehicle that is taken off our roads, potentially totalling an average of more than four tonnes of emissions per vehicle every year; and

(c) in Australia it is estimated that in a single year, air pollution from motor vehicles causes between 900 and 2,000 early deaths and between 900 and 4,500 cases of bronchitis, cardiovascular and respiratory disease, costing between $1.5 and $3.8 billion; and

(2 ) supports:

(a) positive incentives such as the National Ride to Work Day to encourage people to take up cycling;

(b) riding to work as a way of getting fitter, having some fun, reducing traffic congestion and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and

(c)  policies, projects and initiatives that deliver increased options for active transport. ( Notice given 14 October 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

8   Mr Ripoll: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) chronic disease is one of the country’s most critical health challenges;

(b) more than 50 per cent of the Australian population a lready suffers from a chronic or long term condition of some form; and

(c) the rise of these diseases poses both a major risk to the long term health of millions of Australians and a frontline economic challenge; and

(2) supports:

(a) the Government’s c ontinued commitment to preventative health strategies and closing the gap in indigenous life expectancy;

(b) initiatives to support the role of the primary care system on our local communities; and

(c) the increased role the private sector currently plays in delivering health and medical services. ( Notice given 21 October 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

9   Mr Georgiou: To move—That the House:

(1) reaffirms its commitment to the right of all Australians to enjoy equal rights and opportunities and be treated with equal respect regardless of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic orig in;

(2) reaffirms its commitment to maintaining an immigration policy wholly non-discriminatory on grounds of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic origin;

(3) reaffirms its commitment to the process of reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and to closing the gap that lies between us in life expectancy, educational achievement and economic opportunity;

(4) reaffirms its commitment to multiculturalism and to maintaining Australia as a culturally diverse, tolerant and open society, united by an overriding loyalty to our nation, obedience to its laws, and commitment to its democratic beliefs and institutions; and

(5) denounces intolerance in any form on the grounds of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic origin as incompatible with the kind of society we are and want to be. ( Notice given 10 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

10   Mr Secker: To move—That the House notes that:

(1) currently low flow conditions and over allocations are having an extreme impact on the River Murray, Lower Lakes and Coorong;

(2) the region is fast approaching environment al collapse, industries are being lost and communities are suffering;

(3) current predictions of low inflows indicate that the Lakes will drop to even lower levels and that River flow to the Coorong will not occur in the foreseeable future;

(4) the short term challenge under current and likely low flow conditions for 2008 is to use what water is available, after critical human needs, to prevent irretrievable damage to the river systems; and

(5) the long term challenge is to implement strategies that protect the environment and maximise the productive use of water resource while maintaining a sustainable river from source to mouth. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

11   Mr Briggs: To move—That the House:

(1) condemns the Rudd Government for its h andling of the water crisis;

(2) demands the Government release a minimum of 30 gigalitres into the Lower Lakes and Coorong as recommended by the Senate inquiry;

(3) notes that:

(a) low water levels in the Goolwa area are seriously affecting small busin ess and tourism operators;

(b) flooding the area with sea water would destroy the natural environment; and

(c) the trade for some businesses has dropped by nearly 90 per cent; and

(4) calls on the Government to:

(a) provide immediate financial assistan ce to the affected communities; and

(b) stop playing the blame game and take decisive action. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

12   Mr Marles: To move—That the House:

(1) acknowledges the importance of the Australian car industry and recognises its important role in the economy as a:

(a) provider of employm ent;

(b) major exporter; and

(c) basis of high technology manufacturing; and

(2) supports the Government’s initiative for a package of measures for the car industry designed to improve the international competitiveness of the Australian car industry and to promote the manufacture of greener cars. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

13   Mr Secker: To move—That the House notes that:

(1) a group of dedicated Australians has established the Zimbabwe Outreach Program and Orphanages Mutare (ZOPOM) Foundation;

(2) the Murwira Orphanage caters for children from a fe w months old to twelve years of age in Mutare, an area of desperate need in Zimbabwe where one in five children are orphans and 100 babies become HIV positive every day;

(3) Paula Leen, a 74 year old United States citizen, single-handedly runs the Murwira Orphanage and her outreach program feeds over 2,000 destitute people a month;

(4) the ZOPOM Foundation in Australia under the umbrella of the Global Development Group aims to fund Paula Leen’s work with donations;

(5) the ZOPOM Foundation provides Australians with a chance to assist in a small way with all funds going directly to the Murwira Orphanage and Outreach program; and

(6) the humanitarium crisis in Zimbabwe is presently so critical that the immediate ZOPOM Foundation aim is to urgently purchase food from South Africa to send to the Murwira Orphanage. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

14   Mr Dreyfus: To move—That the House:

(1)  notes that 2008 marks the 70 th anniversary of the Evian Conference, convened by President Roosevelt 11-18 July 1938 in France, as an inter-governmental meeting to discuss and formulate an adequate international response to the plight of European Jewry in need of refuge from persecution under the Nazi regime in Germany;

(2) recalls that:

(a)  an estimated 6 million Jews and millions of others died during the Holocaust as a result of Nazi policies of the ‘final solution’ carried out until 1945;

(b) the Australian Minister for Trade and Customs, Lieutenant-Colonel T W White stated at the Evian Conference: ‘It will no doubt be appreciated also that, as we have no real racial problems, we are not desirous of importing one by encouraging any scheme of large-scale foreign migration.’; and

(c) the attitude of the Nazi Government to the response of Australia was to note how ‘astounding’ it was that foreign countries criticised Germany for their treatment of the Jews, but none of them wanted to open the doors to them when ‘the opportunity [was] offer[ed]’;

(3) notes that:

(a)  the Holocaust constitutes one of the most heinous acts of genocide in history;

(b) it remains insufficiently known and acknowledged by the world community that the decisions made at the Evian Conference resulted in the abandonment of the opportunity to save the lives of millions of Jewish people who ultimately perished;

(c) Lieutenant-Colonel White’s statement on behalf of the Government of Australia is still visible at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, as the single representative response for all other nations’ responses of indifference at the Evian Conference, and is viewed by thousands of tourists annually; and

(d) the 9 December 2008 marks the 60 th anniversary of the signing at the United Nations of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, to which Australia was one of the first signatories;

(4)  honours the memory of all those who lost their lives in the Holocaust; and

(5) calls for the Australian Government to send to the Government of Israel a statement of recognition of and regret for the decisions made by Australia at the Evian Conference in 1938, stating Australia’s present friendship with Israel, acknowledging past wrongs, remembering the 70 th anniversary of the Evian Conference, and commemorating the 60 th anniversary of the State of Israel, written on a plaque to be given to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, with a request that the plaque be displayed. ( Notice given 24 November 2008 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009 .)

15   Dr Stone: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that under section 417 of the Migration Act 1958 , the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship may intervene personally making decisions in relation to individuals;

(2) encourages the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship to urgently resolve his ambivalence about using these ministeri al powers of intervention, given the consequences for individuals and families whose urgent requests for intervention remain unresolved, in some cases for nearly a year; and

(3) requests that the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship responds to the report he commissioned analysing the use of ministerial powers (the Elizabeth Proust Report) which has been with him since 29 January 2008. ( Notice given 25 November 2008 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

16   Mr Adams: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) micro-brewers in Australia have an excellent product that has provided a niche market and is complementing boutique wines as a regional tourism product; and

(b) these micro-brewers are suffering disadvantage because they are treated differently to the small wine industry in relation to tax; and

(2) calls on the Government to:

(a)  support a review of the tax system in relation to micro-brewers, with a view to making the tax more equitable and in a similar tax regime as for the boutique wine growers and the Wine Equalisation Tax; and

(b) continue to support the development of rural and regional areas with innovative new products such as those being developed by micro-brewers. ( Notice given 26 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

17   Mr Hartsuyker: To move—That the House:

(1) condemns the decision by the New South Wales (NSW) Government to charge private hospitals for the supply of blood and blood products; and

(2) expresses its concern that:

(a) this decision to turn the supply of blood and blood products into a State money-making enterprise will deter all those who voluntarily donate blood; and

(b) any extra charge to private patients will result in an extra burden on the public health service in NSW which is already unable to cope with demand. ( Notice given 2 December 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

18   Ms Parke: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) three young Australians, Scott Rush, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, are currently facing the death penalty in Indonesia;

(b) the right to life is a fundamental human right recognised in:

(i) the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which celebrates its 60 th anniversary on 10 December 2008;

(ii) the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which both Australia and Indonesia are parties, and

  1. Article 28A of the Indonesian Constitution ;
  1. respect for human life and dignity are values common to Australia and Indonesia;
  1. abhorrence of the death penalty is a fundamenta l value in Australian society—Australia is a party to the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which is aimed at the universal abolition of the death penalty;
  2. there is bipartisan support for the universal abolition of the death penalty within t he Australian Parliament—the Cross-Party Working Group Against the Death Penalty has been re-established during this parliamentary sitting, with Chris Hayes MP and Senator Gary Humphries as co-convenors; and

(f) the Australian Government will in the near future co-sponsor a resolution in the United Nations General Assembly seeking a global moratorium on capital punishment, as it has done in previous years;

(2) believes that abolition of the death penalty contributes to the enhancement of human dignity and progressive development of human rights;

(3) requests that:

(a) the House incorporate into domestic law the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to prevent any government in Australia in the future from reintroducing the death penalty and to communicate Australia’s position on the death penalty to the world at large;

(b) the Indonesian Government favourably consider the Indonesian Constitutional Court’s recommendation of 30 October 2007 in the majority reasoning at paragraph 3.26, in particular sub-paragraph (b), which says that the death penalty should be able to be imposed with a probation period of ten years, so that, in a case where a prisoner shows good behaviour, it can be amended to a life-long sentence or imprisonment for 20 years; and

(c) in the event that remaining legal processes fail in respect of any persons facing the death penalty in Indonesia, the President of Indonesia extend clemency by commuting their sentences to terms of imprisonment; and

(4) records the importance to Australia of its continuing excellent relationship with our near neighbour, the Republic of Indonesia. ( Notice given 3 December 2008 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

19   Mr Danby: To move—That the House:

(1) celebrates and commends the achievements of the Turkish Community here in the Commonwealth of Aus tralia that has been created as a result of the Formal Agreement between the Government of the Commonwealth of Australia and the Government of the Republic of Turkey concerning the Residence and Employment of Turkish Citizens in Australia, in the 40 years since its implementation;

(2) notes that:

(a) once enemies on the battlefields of Gallipoli, the Commonwealth of Australia and the Republic of Turkey have established a unique relationship and bond forged in the blood of young men from both nations; and

(b) this uniqueness at the core of deep rooted relations between two countries gained even more momentum by the unforgettable reconciliatory remarks of the Founder of the Modern Turkish Republic Mustafa Kemal Ataturk to the mothers of fallen Anzacs: ‘…You, the mothers, who sent their sons from far away countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.’;

(3) recognises that the Turkish nation is now a friendly power and members of the Turkish community have now integrated into Australian society;

(4) acknowledges the unique relationship that exists between Australia and Turkey; a bond highlighted by both nations’ commitment to the rights and liberties of our citizens and the pursuit of a just world, highlighted by the Statement of Ataturk: ‘Peace at Home, Peace in the World’;

(5) commends the Republic of Turkey’s commitment to democracy, the Rule of Law and secularism; and

(6) on this 40 th anniversary of this agreement, pledges our friendship, commitment and enduring support to the people of Turkey as we celebrate this important occasion together. ( Notice given 4 December 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

Orders of the day

1   Save Our Solar (Solar Rebate Protection) Bill 2008 ( Mr Hunt ) : Second reading ( from 23 June 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 February 2009. )

2   cleaners: Resumption of debate ( from 23 June 2008—Ms Ley , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That the House:

(1) acknowledges the important contributions of cleaners across Australia as recognised through the International Day for Cleaners in June 2008;

(2) recognises that cleaners require j obs that provide them with basic economic security, enough time to do their jobs properly, and respect in their workplaces as essential elements of these reforms;

(3) supports the call for a fair go for cleaners across Australia; and

(4) congratulates all cleaners for the work they have done in promoting the ‘Clean Start’ campaign and the rights of cleaners across Australia. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 February 2009. )

3   Emergency Assistance Fund for the Lower Lakes and Coorong Region of South Australia Bill 2008 ( Dr Nelson ) : Second reading ( from 1 September 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 February 2009. )

4   uranium sales to india: Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 2008—Mr Dreyfus ) on the motion of Mr Johnson—That the House:

(1) recognises the strategic importance of India to 21 st century global geo-politics; and

(2) encourages the Australian Government to reverse its short-sighted decision to cancel Australia’s uranium sales to India. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 February 2009. )

5   ordinary seaman teddy sheean: Resumption of debate ( from 15 September 2008 ) on the motion of Mr Sidebottom—That the House:

(1) recognises the heroic efforts of Ordinary Seaman Teddy Sheean and his crew mates upon the sinking of the HMAS Armidale on 1 December 1942 off the Timor coast;

(2) implores the Government to award a posthumous Victoria Cross of Australia to Ordinary Seaman Teddy Sheean to recognise properly his valour and sacrifice on 1 December 1942; and

(3) urges the Government to establish a mechanism to address outstanding issues and anomalies in the military honours system such as recognising the courageous deeds of people such as Ordinary Seaman Teddy Sheean on 1 December 1942. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

6   epidermolysis bullosa: Resumption of debate ( from 15 September 2008—Mr Zappia , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Morrison—That the House:

(1) notes that Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic condition characterised by skin fragility and blister formation, which is incurable and in its most severe forms c an be fatal in infancy and childhood;

(2) notes that children afflicted by EB are known as ‘butterfly children’ and are required to pierce, drain and dress their blisters each day in an endless routine that lasts up to three hours in the most severe cases;

(3)  notes there are currently 229 patients formally diagnosed and registered on the Australasian EB Registry and that based on international estimates there may be up to 1,000 people affected by this condition in Australia, of whom 100-150 have the most severe form;

(4) acknowledges the support and assistance provided to sufferers and their families by DebRA Australia, the national Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa research association;

(5) recognises that families with a child suffering from EB have problems accessing dressings because of expense or availability from the public system, and in the more severe cases families must spend up to $5,300 per month on dressings; and

(6) calls on the Australian Government to establish a 12 month trial program, managed by the Department of Health and Ageing in partnership with DebRA, to:

(a) fund delivery of dressings directly to patients currently registered on the Australasian EB registry from suppliers identified through a public tender process;

(b) provide access to a dedicated nurse in each sta te and territory for patients suffering from EB; and

(c) review the program upon conclusion, with a view to establishing a permanent scheme. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

7   the development of northern australia: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 2008 ) on the motion of Mr Tuckey—That the House recognises the energy, water and agricultural potential of the far north of Australia, and in particular the Kimberley region, and urges the Parliament to give priority to the development of northern Australia. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

8   national police remembrance day: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 2008—Mr Zappia , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That the House:

(1) recognises and acknowledges the significant contribution that officers across all Australian policing jurisdictions make to our local communities as we approach Nationa l Police Remembrance Day on 29 September 2008;

(2) remembers and comes together to commemorate the ultimate sacrifices made by all police officers who have been killed in the course of their duties;

(3) honours the courage, commitment and memory of the many fine men and women who lost their lives in the execution of their official duty each made in serving our community;

(4) pays tribute to the families and friends of those fallen police officers for the support they unreservedly provided during the career of their respective loved ones;

(5) encourages all Australians as a sign of respect to those who have fallen, to attend a ceremony or wear or display the traditional blue and white chequerboard ribbon, officially recognised as the symbol of Remembrance Day; and

(6) supports and thanks all serving police of Australia for their invaluable dedication and commitment to make a difference, defend our way of life and safeguard the peace. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

9   drought: Resumption of debate ( from 13 October 2008—Mr Chester , in continuation ) on the motion of Mrs Hull—That the House:

(1) recognise the seriousness of the drought situation across rural Australia; and

(2) calls on the Government to:

(a) recognise the need for long term commitment for Exceptional Circumstances (EC) declared area s, and to provide continued support to allow those areas to fully recover from the drought;

(b) look at the history of EC declared areas and the direct correlation between longevity of declaration and hardship inflicted;

(c) commit to the extension of support programs to allow those areas to fully recover regardless of meeting current EC requirements; and

(d) extend EC assistance to all rural based businesses who meet the criteria. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

10   united nations: Resumption of debate ( from 20 October 2008—Mrs B. K. Bishop , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That the House:

(1)  notes that the 24 October is United Nations Day, celebrating the entry into force of the United Nations Charter on 24 October 1945;

(2) celebrates Australia’s key role in the formation of the United Nations and the drafting of the United Nations Charter;

(3) recognises that Australia has been a consistent and long-term contributor to United Nations’ efforts to safeguard international peace and security and to pro mote human rights, for example, by being the thirteenth largest contributor to the United Nations’ budget; by contributing to many United Nations’ peacekeeping operations; and by firmly committing to increasing Australia’s development assistance and seeking real progress towards the Millennium Development Goals;

(4) notes further the Australian Government’s commitment to the multilateral system as one of the three fundamental pillars of Australia’s foreign policy; that Australia is determined to work through the United Nations to enhance security and economic well-being worldwide; and to uphold the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter;

(5) notes that as the only truly global organisation, the United Nations plays a critical role in addressing the global challenges that no country can resolve on its own and that Australia is determined to play its part within the United Nations to help address serious global challenges, including conflict prevention, international development, climate change, terrorism and the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction;

(6) notes also Australia’s commitment to, and support for, reform of the United Nations’ system in order to ensure that the organisation reflects today's world and is able to function efficiently and effectively; and

(7) reaffirms the faith of the Australian people in the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

11   climate protection bill 2008 ( Mr Windsor ) : Second reading ( from 10 November 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

12   housing: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mrs Moylan—That the House:

(1)  recognises the serious state of housing availability and affordability in the public, not for profit and private sector in many cities and towns in Australia and the hardship it causes those on low and fixed incomes;

(2) notes that:

(a) it is having a serious impact on many in the community including those on low and fixed incomes, pensioners, disability pensioners, veterans, young families and students;

(b) the situation has been exacerbated by the d ereliction of duty of State governments in failing to maintain adequate stocks of public rental properties, with unacceptably long waiting-lists for public housing;

(c) in Western Australia (WA), for example, it has been reported that there are 16,000 families on the Homeswest waiting list in May 2008 with similar trends in other states;

(d) there has been a contraction of approximately 30,000 public dwellings, which, factoring in population growth over the last decade, amounts to a loss of 100,000 dwellings in the public sector;

(e) this dereliction of duty is increasing the reliance on the private rental market where housing is in short supply, new building approvals are plummeting and rental vacancy rates are at the lowest levels in 20 years;

(f) Commonwealth Rent Assistance (CRA) is not adequately addressing the gap between the high level of rent being paid and what is affordable and that in many areas there are few, if any, housing choices available;

(g) despite the twice yearly adjustment of CRA to the Consumer Price Index of 4.3 per cent, the average rental increase has been 7.1 per cent;

(h) the median weekly rent of three bedroom houses has increased on a nationally weighted average by 46.75 per cent, and in fact, from June 1998 to June 2007 rents have increased by 93.55 per cent in WA and by 105.88 per cent in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT);

(i) rent assistance as a percentage of median weekly rent in WA has dropped from 31.8 per cent in June 2001 to 20.4 per cent in June 2007 and in the ACT from 25.6 per cent in June 1998 to 17.4 per cent in June 2007;

(j) overall, renting has become less affordable nationally even for those in receipt of CRA;

(k) according to national figures from the Australian Government Housing data set in June 2006, over one-third of CRA recipients pay more than 30 per cent of their income on rent, after CRA is factored in; and

(l) public housing approvals have plummeted to 131 new council approvals in March 2008, well short of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ decade average of 350 new public housing approvals monthly; and

(3) calls on the Federal Government to:

(a) work with State governments through COAG to urgently address the national shortage of public, not for profit and private housing includ ing delays in local government development approvals;

(b) urgently review the adequacy of CRA paid to those on low and fixed incomes;

(c) investigate making CRA or similar payment available to eligible recipients who are purchasing their own homes and wh o are experiencing severe mortgage stress, with the aim of keeping people in their own homes and taking some of the pressures off the public and private sector rental market;

(d) consider changing the CRA formula to reflect the lack of choice and the increasing cost of rent beyond inflation, by linking CRA to actual rent using the highest median rent in each area;

(e) target a proportion of assistance for development of housing in high employment growth areas, in recognition that for those looking for work in areas of high labour demand, high rents are acting as a disincentive for some people to escape the poverty cycle; and

(f) pay particular attention to development options for multi-dwelling supported accommodation models to provide for those with disabilities who may formally have been housed in institutions. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

13   zimbabwe: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2008—Mrs Moylan , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Danby—That the House:

(1) congratulates Mr Morgan Tsvangirai, leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), on his appointment as Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, which is a just recognition of his long struggle for democracy and reform in Zimbabwe;

(2) acknowledges the courage of the people of Zimbabwe in defying the thuggery and intimidation of the Mugabe regime in voting for a change of regime at the Zimbabwe elections of March 2008;

(3) condemns the Mugabe regime for instituting a reign of violence and intimidation which forced Mr Tsvangirai to withdraw from the second round of the presidential election, despite his clear lead in the first round;

(4) calls on the international community, and particularly Zimbabwe’s African neighbours and its fellow members of the Commonwealth, to maintain pressure on the Mugabe regime to ensure that it carries out the terms of the power-sharing agreement between the regime and the MDC; and

(5) calls on the Australian Government to render every assistance to Mr Tsvangirai in carrying out the reforms urgently needed to restore democratic elections, good government and economic prosperity to the long-suffering people of Zimbabwe. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

14   white ribbon day: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2008—Dr Stone , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That the House:

(1) 25 November 2 008 marks White Ribbon Day in Australia;

(2) in 1999, the United Nations General Assembly declared November 25 the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the White Ribbon has become the symbol for the day; and

(3) the White Ribbon Foundation of Australia aims to eliminate violence against women by promoting culture change around the issue. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

15   Saving the Goulburn and Murray Rivers Bill 2008 ( Fran Bailey ) : Second reading ( from 1 December 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 February 2009. )

 
 
 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS AND PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS (standing orders 34, 35 and 192): Presentation and consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business have precedence each Monday from 8.40 to 9.30 p.m. in the House of Representatives Chamber and from 6.55 to 8.30 p.m. in the Main Committee.

The whips are responsible for determining the order of precedence and allotting time for debate on consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business. Their recommendations for the next sitting Monday, adopted by the House, are shown under “Business Accorded Priority” for the House and Main Committee. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation reports which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority by the whips on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).