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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notice given for Tuesday, 8 November 2016

    *1    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         condemns the shocking findings uncovered by the Victorian Inquiry into the Labour Hire Industry and Insecure Work, including revelations of widespread underpayment, workplace health and safety breaches, maltreatment of workers, and tax avoidance in Victoria;

(2)         welcomes the 35 recommendations made by the Inquiry in its Final Report (August 2016);

(3)         commends the Victorian Government for:

(a)         establishing the Inquiry; and

(b)         committing to a labour hire licensing scheme in response to the Inquiry’s Final Report; and

(4)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         investigate the operation of the labour hire industry Australia-wide; and

(b)         commit to developing a national response to widespread exploitation in the industry based on findings.

              ( Notice given 7 November 2016. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         reaffirms its commitment to:

(a)         the right of all Australians to enjoy equal rights and be treated with equal respect regardless of race, colour, creed or origin;

(b)         maintaining an immigration policy wholly non-discriminatory on the grounds of race, colour, creed or origin;

(c)         the process of reconciliation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, in the context of redressing their profound social and economic disadvantage; and

(d)         maintaining Australia as a culturally diverse, tolerant and open society, united by an overriding commitment to our nation, and its democratic institutions and values; and

(2)         denounces racial intolerance in any form as incompatible with the kind of society we are and want to be. 

              ( Notice given 30 August 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       2    Mrs Elliot : To move—That this House notes that:

(1)         families in regional and rural Australia rely on penalty rates;

(2)         the take home pay of families in regional and rural Australia would be severely impacted if penalty rates were cut;

(3)         cutting penalty rates in regional and rural Australia would hurt workers such as nurses and health care workers, retail and hospitality workers, police, firefighters, ambulance officers, cleaners, services sector employees and tourism and transport industry employees;

(4)         members and candidates of the Liberal Party of Australia and the National Party continue to call for cuts to penalty rates on top of their continuous pressuring of the Fair Work Commission to reduce penalty rates in its current penalty rates case; and

(5)         cutting penalty rates in regional and rural areas would also have a devastating flow-on impact for regional economies. 

              ( Notice given 1 September 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       3    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in June 2014, the Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO) commenced an inquiry into Woolworths’ procurement of trolley collection services, because the FWO had not seen Woolworths take steps to address non-compliance amongst its trolley collecting contractors;

(b)         by examining 130 of Woolworths’ supermarket sites across Australia, the inquiry found that 79 per cent of sites visited had indications of some form of non-compliance with workplace laws; and

(c)         the inquiry found incidences of workers being paid rates as low as $10 an hour;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         trolley collection is a low skill and labour intensive enterprise, attracting large numbers of vulnerable workers; and

(b)         under section 500 of the Fair Work Act 2009 , employers are obligated to provide effective governance of the supply chain through which they engage workers;

(3)         condemns the Government’s inaction to tackle the issue of exploitation in the labour-hire industry; and

(4)         calls on the Government to adopt Labor’s policies to (a) increase fines for employers who break workplace laws and exploit workers, and (b) licence the labour hire industry.

              ( Notice given Monday 12 September 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       4    Ms C. F. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         calls on the Government to establish a National Redress Scheme for Survivors of Institutional Sexual Abuse, following the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, which include the:

(a)         creation of an independent National Redress Agency; and

(b)         provision of counselling and financial redress with costs met by the institutions responsible for the perpetrators of the abuse; and

(2)         recommends that the Government consult extensively on further details of a National Redress Scheme to ensure that it fully meets the ongoing and complex needs of survivors and their families.

              ( Notice given 15 September 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       5    Mr Perrett : To move—That this House: 

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         prior to the passage of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987 the Houses of the Australian Parliament had the power to expel a Senator or Member of the House of Representatives;

(b)         the expulsion of a Member of this House is the most drastic of sanctions;

(c)         on 11 November 1920, the then Member for Kalgoorlie, Mr Hugh Mahon, was expelled from this House; and

(d)         Mr Mahon is the only Member to have ever been expelled from this House;

(2)         acknowledges that Mr Mahon was expelled:

(a)         by a motion brought on hastily and with limited time for debate;

(b)         by a vote of the House on party lines; and

(c)         without the due process and procedural fairness that such an important issue deserves; and

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         it was unjust on the limited evidence for the institution to which Mr Mahon had been democratically elected to reverse the decision of his constituents; and

(b)         the expulsion of Mr Mahon was a misuse of the power then invested in the House.

              ( Notice given 10 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       6    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         condemns the Australian Government for:

(a)         denying Victoria its fair share of infrastructure funding, to the point that Victoria now only receives 9 per cent of the federal infrastructure budget;

(b)         consistently failing to fund, or delaying support for, Victorian road and rail infrastructure projects; and

(c)         applying unreasonable funding conditions to Victoria while fully cooperating with the New South Wales (NSW) Government; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         provide Victoria with an equitable share of infrastructure funding given Victoria is Australia’s fastest growing state and home to 25 per cent of Australia’s population;

(b)         treat Victorian infrastructure projects fairly and on the same basis as NSW projects; and

(c)         commit to working with the Victorian Government to support infrastructure projects that are in the interests of the Victorian community and economy rather than the Coalition’s narrow political interests.

              ( Notice given 13 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       7    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the:

(a)         high level of concern in the community, especially in recent years, about the generosity and leniency of the current parliamentary entitlements framework; and

(b)         fact that current parliamentary entitlements are out of line with community expectations;

(2)         notes that the Government-commissioned report on the review of an independent parliamentary entitlements system (Mr John Conde AO and Mr David Tune AO PSM, An Independent Parliamentary Entitlements System ), was delivered to the Government in February 2016, but so far there has been little progress on implementing its recommendations;

(3)         acknowledges that there is a need for a much deeper overhaul of the parliamentary entitlements system, including:

(a)         an audit of all Members’ and Senators’ travel claims during this and the previous Parliament;

(b)         real-time online reporting of entitlement expenses and the requirement for more detail of the substantive reason for the expenditure; and

(c)         provisions to refer misuse which forms a pattern of misbehaviour to the Australian Federal Police; and

(4)         calls on the Government to commit to meaningful reform of the parliamentary entitlements framework that would put it in line with community expectations.

              ( Notice given 13 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       8    Mr Husic : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the significance of the 70th anniversary of bilateral relations between Australia and the Philippines; and

(2)         acknowledges the importance of an effective and diplomatic friendship with the Philippines, who share values of respect for human rights, democracy and economic freedom.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

       9    Ms Vamvakinou : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         500 to 700 Palestinian children are arrested, detained and prosecuted in the Israeli military court system each year;

(b)         Human Rights Watch reported in April that arrests of Palestinian children by Israeli forces had doubled in the preceding six months;

(c)         Defence for Children International research, based on 429 affidavits from Palestinian children, indicates that 97 per cent of children had no parent or legal counsel available during interrogation and 75 per cent endured some form of physical violence following arrest;

(d)         the United States State Department’s 2014 human rights report on Israel states that military courts have more than a 99 per cent conviction rate for Palestinian defendants;

(e)         UNICEF has reported that ill-treatment in the Israeli military detention system remains widespread, systematic, and institutionalised throughout the process; and

(f)          Australia raised concerns with Israel about the treatment of Palestinian minors in 2011 and 2014, however there has been little improvement concerning the treatment of Palestinian children by Israeli forces; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to raise concerns with the Israeli Government about the treatment of Palestinian children.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

    10    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the Fair Work Ombudsman’s (FWO’s) report Inquiry into the wages and conditions of people working under the 417 Working Holiday Visa Program (October 2016) found that more than one third of 417 visa holders claimed that they were paid less than the minimum wage;

(b)         the inquiry found that the 417 visa program created an environment where unreasonable and unlawful requirements are being imposed on visa holders by unscrupulous businesses;

(c)         the FWO, Ms Natalie James, said in a statement that the inquiry confirms that overseas workers seeking regional work to satisfy the 88 day requirement and obtain a second-year 417 visa are particularly vulnerable to exploitation;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that in 2015-16, 76 per cent of litigations filed by the FWO involved visa holder workers;

(b)         that the inquiry found instances of employers engaging in sophisticated labour supply chains involving sham contracting, where workers were in fact employees, to exploit vulnerable 417 visa holders to gain a competitive or commercial advantage through the reduction of labour costs; and

(c)         findings from the inquiry found that the 417 visa program has been used to source an unpaid workforce, thus facilitating an unfair commercial advantage to these employers, distorting the market place and placing pressure on the domestic employment market;

(3)         expresses its disappointment in the Government for announcing yet another taskforce, the Migrant Workers Taskforce, to look at the issue of worker exploitation, while there is still no legislation that has been presented to the Parliament that will change the law to protect exploited workers; and

(4)         calls on the Government to join the Opposition in preventing workers from being exploited by supporting its legislation before the Parliament, the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Australian Workers) Bill 2016.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

    11    Mrs Elliot : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that youth unemployment:

(a)         is unacceptably high in regional and rural Australia;

(b)         is causing a negative effect on the social development of young people;

(c)         leads to increased mental health rates;

(d)         increases poverty and inter-generational social problems; and

(e)         is having a negative effect on economic growth and productivity; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop and implement a national strategy to address youth unemployment; and

(b)         provide greater access to better education and training opportunities.

              ( Notice given 20 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      12    Mr Albanese : To present a Bill for an Act to establish the High Speed Rail Planning Authority, and for related purposes. ( High Speed Rail Planning Authority Bill 2016 )

              ( Notice given 20 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

    13    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has cut funding to New South Wales (NSW) health and hospitals;

(b)         doctors and specialist practitioners in NSW cannot do their jobs due to budget cuts and a lack of funding;

(c)         in the National Emergency Access Target, five of the six worst performing hospitals in NSW are in Western Sydney;

(d)         currently, recommended clinical timeframes for treatment are not able to be met due to a lack of resources; and

(e)         people in Western Sydney are suffering as a result of this dangerous funding shortfall; and

(2)         calls on the Prime Minister and Minister for Health to immediately provide an urgent injection of funds into hospitals in Western Sydney, particularly the Nepean Hospital, which serves 350,000 people, in order to address its shortage of beds and health workers.

              ( Notice given 20 October 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

Orders of the day

         1    Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 ( Mr Shorten ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 September 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         2    Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 [No. 2] ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 September 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         3    Mobile Black Spot Program: Resumption of debate ( from  12 September 2016 ) on the motion of Mrs Sudmalis —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         improving mobile communications is of critical importance for people living in regional and remote parts of Australia; and

(b)         the Government has committed $220 million over three funding rounds to the Mobile Black Spot Program which will provide new or upgraded coverage to more than 3,000 black spots in regional and remote areas;

(2)         recognises that mobile communications are not only essential for commerce, agriculture and education, but also for emergency services and public safety; and

(3)         congratulates the Government for committing public funds to this important program to improve mobile communications in regional and remote Australia. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         4    National servicemen: Resumption of debate ( from  12 September 2016 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         recognises the important role that national servicemen played in the defence of Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that Australia owes a great debt to these men who underwent military training and served our nation, many of those on foreign soil, in the Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army and Royal Australian Air Force, in the advancement and protection of Australia’s national interests;

(3)         further acknowledges that during the:

(a)         first national service scheme between 1951 to 1959, approximately 227,000 men served across the three branches of the armed services, providing an important military capability during a period when Australia faced many international security challenges; and

(b)         second national service scheme from 1964 to 1972, more than 804,000 men registered for national service, of whom more than 63,000 were called up to serve in the Australian Army, and that during this period, more than 15,000 went on to serve in the Vietnam War, with 201 killed and more than 1,200 wounded; and

(4)         thanks the ‘Nashos’ for their service and encourages the Australian community to remember the service of these men each year on 14 February which is National Servicemen’s Day.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         5    Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Amendment (Strategic Assets) Bill 2016 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         6    Banking Commission of Inquiry Bill 2016 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         7    Domestic violence and technology facilitated abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  10 October 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of changing the national culture to make disrespecting women un-Australian;

(2)         welcomes the Government’s $100 million Women’s Safety Package to combat domestic violence;

(3)         supports efforts at the upcoming COAG meeting to engage all levels of government and the broader community on this shared national endeavour;

(4)         places on record its deep concern about the use of new technology and in particular smart phone tracking applications by family violence perpetrators to obtain and monitor the location of their victims; and

(5)         calls on all governments to consider this as part of their strategy to combat domestic violence and technology facilitated abuse.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         8    Vietnam Veterans: Resumption of debate ( from  11 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 18 August is Vietnam Veterans Day;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         prior to 1987, Vietnam Veterans Day was referred to as Long Tan Day;

(b)         2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, a battle that took place on 18 August 1966; and

(c)         at the Battle of Long Tan:

                                                          (i)       less than 120 soldiers from Delta Company faced over 2,000 soldiers;

                                                        (ii)       18 Australian soldiers lost their lives during battle, with 25 more injured; and

                                                       (iii)       over 245 Vietnamese soldiers also lost their lives;

(3)         further notes that:

(a)         approximately 60,000 Australians served in Vietnam; and

(b)         upon their return to Australia, many Vietnam Veterans struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder and a disregard from an Australian public unsupportive of the Vietnam War;

(4)         acknowledges:

(a)         the soldiers who fought alongside Australians;

(b)         the hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians that lost their lives during the Vietnam War;

(c)         the sacrifices of the Vietnamese are rarely mentioned in Australia’s collective stories of the Vietnam War; and

(d)         that Vietnam Veterans deserve the respect and recognition of all Australian Society; and

(5)         recognises the:

(a)         bravery and heroism of the soldiers of Delta Company that fought at Long Tan; and

(b)         sacrifices made by Australian and former Republic of Vietnam soldiers that fought alongside each other during the Vietnam War.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

         9    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Foreign Political Donations) Bill 2016 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      10    Aged Care (Living Longer Living Better) Amendment (Review) Bill 2016 ( Ms Collins ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      11    Criminal Code Amendment (Private Sexual Material) Bill 2016 ( Mr Watts ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      12    Australian Postal Corporation (Unsolicited Political Communications) Bill 2016 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      13    Death penalty: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the strong multi-party commitment in Australia to see an end to the death penalty worldwide;

(b)         that 10 October was World Day Against the Death Penalty, an important moment to mark our resolve to end capital punishment around the world;

(c)         that the evidence overwhelmingly shows that the death penalty is not an effective deterrent to crime;

(d)         that the death penalty is the ultimate cruel and inhumane punishment and Australia opposes its use in all cases;

(e)         that the international trend shows the world is moving away from the death penalty—in 1977 only 16 countries had abolished the death penalty, now 140 nations have abolished capital punishment in law or practice;

(f)          that despite this overwhelming trend, 2015 saw more people executed than in any year in the past quarter century, with executions carried out by several of Australia’s neighbours and allies; and

(g)         that Australia has the opportunity to influence progress towards the worldwide abolition of the death penalty in its relationships with key regional and global partners;

(2)         welcomes the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade inquiry into Australia’s Advocacy for the Abolition of the Death Penalty: A world without the death penalty (May 2016), and looks forward to the Government’s response to its recommendations; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         continue to strengthen its efforts to advocate for an end to the death penalty wherever it still occurs;

(b)         support civil society efforts to advocate for an end to the death penalty, particularly in retentionist countries; and

(c)         encourage other United Nations member states to support a global moratorium on the death penalty at upcoming United Nations General Assembly negotiations on a moratorium resolution.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      14    National Week of Deaf People: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 15 to 23 October is National Week of Deaf People, which provides an opportunity for:

(a)         deaf people to celebrate their communities and achievements;

(b)         awareness of local, state and national communities to be promoted; and

(c)         Parliament’s current pilot of captioning in the House and Senate to be acknowledged;

(2)         notes the rights of deaf people to access Australian Sign Language (AUSLAN) as their first language; and

(3)         acknowledges that:

(a)         deaf people are a minority both culturally and linguistically; and

(b)         acceptance of the need for bilingual education of AUSLAN and English is necessary to promote equality and lifelong learning.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

      15    Cancer: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Broadbent —That this House:

(1)         recognises that cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Australia, causing to 33 per cent of deaths;

(2)         further recognises that October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month;

(3)         congratulates the Government for being committed to cancer research through funding the National Health and Medical Research Council and Cancer Australia, and establishing the Medical Research Future Fund;

(4)         welcomes the Government providing $18.5 million to the McGrath Foundation to deliver 57 trained breast care nurses to assist and care for people diagnosed with breast cancer;

(5)         further congratulates the Government for delivering savings to taxpayers while ensuring that the latest cancer-fighting medications are on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), available for patients as soon as possible, without fear or favour;

(6)         welcomes the addition of new drugs such as Herceptin and Kadcyla within the Government’s investment in the PBS; and

(7)         further welcomes the large number of approvals for cancer-fighting drugs that this Government has approved for the PBS, worth over $1.9 billion.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

    *16    Drowning deaths: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Dr McVeigh —That this House:

(1)         recognises that the number of drownings in Australia increased from 267 deaths in 2014-15 to 280 in 2015-16 as stated in the Royal Life Saving’s National Drowning Report (September 2016), which shows:

(a)         a quarter of all drownings occurred in inland waterways such as rivers, creeks and dams;

(b)         almost one fifth of all deaths occurred in people age 25 to 35 years;

(c)         86 per cent of all drowning deaths were males; and

(d)         there was a 30 per cent decrease in deaths of people age 0 to 4 years;

(2)         acknowledges that every incidence of drowning has a wider impact including family, rescuers and communities;

(3)         recognises that the Government released the Australian Water Safety Strategy in April 2016, which aims to reduce drowning deaths by 50 per cent by 2020;

(4)         acknowledges that the Government is partnering with the peak water safety bodies such as Royal Life Saving (RLS), Surf Life Saving (SLS) and AUSTSWIM as well as Australian Water Safety Council Members and federal, state, territory and local governments, to work to prevent drowning;

(5)         recognises that the Government is providing funding of $3.6 million in 2016-17 through the National Recreation Safety Program work towards the target of reducing drowning deaths; and

(6)         congratulates RLS, SLS and other community groups for their work in educating people on the potential dangers of all our beaches and waterways.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

    *17    Deeming rates for Australian pensioners: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Husar —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is short changing Australian pensioners;

(b)         despite interest rates falling from 2.25 per cent in February 2015 to 1.50 per cent today, the Government has failed to adjust deeming rates for Australian pensioners;

(c)         currently a single pensioner’s savings are deemed at 1.75 per cent on the first $49,200 and any amount over that is deemed at 3.25 per cent;

(d)         deeming rates are supposed to reflect returns across a range of investment choices available in the market, but the Government is failing to act by lowering deeming rates; and

(e)         Australian part-pensioners are doing it tough in a low interest rate environment and pensioners are crying out for some relief; and

(2)         calls on the Prime Minister to immediately reduce deeming rates in line with falling interest rates, so that pensioners’ assets are deemed fairly and Australian pensioners finally get some relief.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 November 2016. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).