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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Tuesday, 26 May 2015

The Federation Chamber meets at 4 pm

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2015-2016 ( Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 —Mrs McNamara, in continuation ).

         2    Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2015-2016 ( Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Finance ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2015 —Mr A. S. Burke ).

         3    Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 1) 2015-2016 ( Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Finance ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2015 —Mr Danby ).

         4    Appropriation Bill (No. 5) 2014-2015 ( Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Finance ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2015 —Mr Danby ).

         5    Appropriation Bill (No. 6) 2014-2015 ( Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Finance ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2015 —Mr Danby ).

       6    Murray-Darling Basin Plan—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs K. L. Andrews —That the House take note of the document.

       7    Prime Minister’s Report 2014-Closing the Gap—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 February 2014 ) on the motion of Mr Abbott —That the House take note of the document.

         8    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS

Orders of the day

       1    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee The 2013 Federal Election: Report on the conduct of the 2013 election and matters related thereto —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Smith —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       2    Health—Standing Committee Skin cancer in Australia: Our national cancer —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 March 2015— Ms M. L. Landry ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       3    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia annual report 2014 (First report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 25 March 2015— Ms O’Dwyer ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       4    Economics—Standing Committee Report on foreign investment in residential real estate —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2015— Mr Byrne ) on the motion of Ms O’Dwyer —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       5    Environment—Standing Committee Streamlining environmental legislation: Inquiry into streamlining environmental regulation, ‘green tape’ and one stop shops —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2015— Mr Byrne ) on the motion of Mr Hawke —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       6    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority annual report 2014 (First Report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 March 2015— Mrs Elliot ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       7    Infrastructure and Communications—Standing Committee Planning, procurement and funding for Australia’s future infrastructure—Report on the inquiry into infrastructure planning and procurement —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2015— Mrs Elliot ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       8    Agriculture and Industry—Standing Committee A clearer message for consumers: Report on the inquiry into country of origin labelling for food —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2015— Mrs Elliot ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       9    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 447: EPBC Act, Cyber Security, Mail Screening, ABR and Helicopter Program—Review of Auditor-General Reports Nos. 32-54 (2013-14) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Dr Southcott —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

     10    Education and Employment—Standing Committee TAFE: an Australian asset —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Mr E. T. Jones —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

     11    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 446: Review of the operations of the Parliamentary Budget Office —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Dr Southcott —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Orders of the day

      *1    Funding for remote Indigenous communities: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that both Commonwealth and state governments have historically shared responsibility for the delivery of services to remote Indigenous communities;

(2)         condemns the Government for cutting $500 million from Indigenous programs in the 2014-15 budget;

(3)         notes that contrary to previous assurances by the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, there has been an impact on frontline services;

(4)         acknowledges the disastrous effect these cuts will have on people living in remote Indigenous communities; and

(5)         calls on the Government to restore the funding, and prevent the loss of frontline services.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      *2    The Regional Arts Fund: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr E. T. Jones —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         as a nation we have some of the world’s best artists, performers and administrators of the arts;

(b)         the recently held Regional Arts Australia Summit in Kalgoorlie-Boulder was a great success;

(c)         the Government:

                                                          (i)       is a strong supporter of the Arts in Australia and recognises the importance art plays in our regional communities; and

                                                        (ii)       continues to make national exhibitions and performing arts companies accessible to regional Australia; and

                                                       (iii)       encourages our national institutions and performing arts companies to have a substantial presence in our regional communities; and

(2)         recognises The Regional Arts Fund provides important funding towards high quality arts projects which leads to strong community engagement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      *3    National Volunteer Week: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         11 to 17 May is National Volunteer Week (NVW);

(b)         the theme for NVW this year is ‘Give Happy Live Happy’; and

(c)         the six million plus Australian volunteers give happiness to others each year; and

(2)         thanks volunteers for their tireless effort and dedication to our community and the enormous contribution they make to our economy and others in the community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      *4    National Palliative Care Week: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes that National Palliative Care Week (NPCW) runs from 24 to 30 May 2015; and

(2)         encourages all Australians to use NPCW as a conversation starter, to get together with those close to them, celebrate life and talk about death, in particular the end of life decisions such as:

(a)         how they want to be cared for;

(b)         what values are important to them;

(c)         what types of medical assistance they want to receive;

(d)         whether they wish to be buried or cremated;

(e)         where they want to pass away;

(f)          whether they have appointed a power of attorney; and

(g)         writing an advanced care plan.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         5    Cruise liner industry: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Laming —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the cruise liner industry makes a significant contribution to the regional economies of Sydney, Fremantle, Brisbane and Melbourne;

(b)         sulphur dioxide emissions are a significant source of air pollution from cruise liners docked at ports in Australia and are harmful to human health; and

(c)         by 2020 the cruise liner industry will implement new measures to reduce sulphur dioxide emissions from cruise ships docked at ports under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships; and

(2)         calls on the cruise liner industry to introduce measures ahead of 2020 to reduce sulphur dioxide emissions from cruise liners docked at ports near residential areas including through the use of low sulphur diesel fuels. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         6    Research and development: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Australian researchers at Monash University and Amaero Engineering Pty Ltd who created the world’s first 3D printed jet engine;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia has a history of punching above its weight when it comes to research and development; and

(b)         huge opportunities are available to create new advanced manufacturing jobs and industries with the right government support for our science, research and manufacturing sectors; and

(3)         condemns the Government’s shortsighted approach to science, research and industry policy, where it has:

(a)         cut $878 million from science and research, including $115 million from the CSIRO;

(b)         recklessly undermined the Australian auto manufacturing sector, risking the loss of millions of dollars annually of investment in research and development;

(c)         failed to support the shipbuilding industry by refusing to guarantee that the 12 future submarines will be built in Australia which would lead to millions of dollars of investment in research and innovation; and

(d)         introduced enormous uncertainty for innovative businesses conducting Australian research and development, with retrograde changes to the Research & Development Tax Incentive that sees the removal of the benefit for expenditure over $100 million and a reduction in the rate of the offset by 1.5 percentage points for all firms across the board.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         7    Tuberculosis: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis Day (WTD);

(b)         WTD is a designated WHO global public health campaign and is an annual event that marks the anniversary of the 1882 discovery by German Nobel Laureate, Dr Robert Koch, of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis;

(c)         tuberculosis is contagious and airborne—it ranks as the world’s second leading cause of death from a single infectious agent and left untreated, each person with active tuberculosis disease will infect on average 10 to 15 people every year;

(d)         the theme for WTD in 2015 is ‘Reach, Treat, Cure Everyone’;

(e)         in 2013, 1.5 million people died from tuberculosis worldwide with 40 per cent of deaths occurring in countries in the lndo Pacific region;

(f)          Papua New Guinea has the highest rate of tuberculosis infection in the Pacific, with an estimated 39,000 total cases and 25,000 infections each year;

(g)         the prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis continues to increase worldwide—rising from 450,000 cases in 2012 to 480,000 cases in 2013, with more than half of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases found in our region; and

(h)         tuberculosis is:

                                                          (i)       the leading cause of death among HIV positive people—HIV weakens the immune system and is lethal in combination with tuberculosis, each contributing to the other’s progress; and

                                                        (ii)       considered to be a preventable and treatable disease, however current treatment tools, drugs, diagnostics and vaccines are outdated and ineffective; and

(2)         recognises:

(a)         Australia’s resolve to continue to work towards combatting the challenge of tuberculosis in the region and the need for discovery, development and rapid uptake of new tools, interventions and strategies as recognised in the WHO End TB Strategy;

(b)         the WHO End TB Strategy was endorsed by all member states at the 2014 World Health Assembly and aims to end the tuberculosis epidemic by 2035;

(c)         the Australian Government funding of health and medical research is helping to bring new medicines, diagnostic tests and vaccines to market for tuberculosis and other neglected diseases; and

(d)         the ongoing support for research and development of new simple and affordable treatment tools for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is essential if the WHO End TB Strategy goal is to be met.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         8    Brain injury: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that Brain Injury Awareness Week will be held from 9 to 15 March 2015;

(b)         that over 700,000 Australians live with a brain injury; and

(c)         the work done by the Bouverie Centre in conjunction with the Victorian Department of Human Services to improve services provided to people with acquired brain injury;

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         provide more services to accommodate people with a brain injury; and

(b)         develop a national scale partnership similar to the partnership seen in Victoria which helps people with a brain injury, and their family members;

(3)         further recognises that Acquired Brain Injuries (ABI) can be acquired in many varied and different ways, e.g. as a result of an accident, a stroke, drug and alcohol abuse, tumours, poisoning, and disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         work with Brain Injury Australia to establish a nation-wide policy which will reflect the needs of people with an ABI, as well as the needs of their families;

(b)         undertake a public awareness campaign to inform the public about ABI, its causes, prevention and management; and

(c)         provide more funding for research into ABI.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         9    Deregulation: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the previous Labor Government introduced more than 21,000 additional regulations in five and a half years and as a consequence, Australia:

                                                          (i)       ranked 128th out of 148 countries for burden of government regulation according to the 2013 World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index; and

                                                        (ii)       came second last in a 2012 ranking of productivity growth by the Economist Intelligence Unit;

(b)         the Government has a deregulation agenda to cut $1 billion in green and red tape each year;

(c)         on 26 March 2014 the Government held the first ever red tape repeal day, removing over 10,000 pieces and 50,000 pages of legislation and regulation saving over $700 million in compliance costs; and

(2)         commends the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister for his effective management of the Government’s deregulation agenda.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      10    Australian Broadcasting Corporation and televising women’s sport: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) has announced it will end its television coverage of the Women’s National Basketball League (WNBL) at the end of the 2014/15 season;

(b)         this decision will end a 35 year partnership between the ABC and WNBL;

(c)         the ABC has been a leader in the broadcast of women’s sport, which has provided a significant boost to the development of women’s sport in Australia;

(d)         any decision to cancel the television broadcast of women’s sport will have a detrimental effect on the participation in the sport, which will reduce the pool of talent available within Australia and therefore the strength and viability of women’s sports such as the WNBL; and

(e)         the basketball statement on the ABC/WNBL partnership on 24 November 2014 as a result of the Australian Government cuts to ABC funding, means that the 2014/15 Wattle Valley WNBL season will be the last shown on ABC TV live around Australia;

(2)         recognises the strong role models elite women sports athletes are to young women and the positive value this has on young women, and that without such television broadcast coverage such positive role models will disappear; and

(3)         calls on:

(a)         the Australian Government to restore the $254 million in budget cuts to the ABC budget; and

(b)         the ABC Board to continue the television broadcasting of women’s sport including the WNBL.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      11    Small businesses and broadband: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Marino —That this House acknowledges that:

(1)         small and medium businesses are the engine room of the Australian economy and employment;

(2)         all Australians, including small business people, should have access to fast, affordable and reliable broadband;

(3)         regional small businesses often encounter greater difficulty accessing broadband and often receive a lower standard of broadband service; and

(4)         the Government has a plan to prioritise getting areas of most need connected to fast reliable broadband sooner, especially in regional areas.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      12    Preservation of languages: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         since 1999, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization has recognised International Mother Language Day (IMLD) on 21 February;

(b)         on 16 May 2007 the United Nations General Assembly in its resolution A/RES/61/266 called upon Member States ‘to promote the preservation and protection of all languages used by peoples of the world’;

(c)         IMLD has been observed every year since its inception to promote linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism; and

(d)         21 February represents the day in 1952 when students demonstrating for recognition of their language, Bangla (as one of the two national languages of the then Pakistan), were shot and killed by police in Dhaka, the capital of what is now Bangladesh;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the importance of languages and their benefits in the broader Australian community;

(b)         that languages are the most powerful instruments for preserving and developing our tangible and intangible heritage; and

(c)         that all moves to promote the dissemination of mother tongues will serve not only to encourage linguistic diversity and multilingual education but to develop fuller awareness of linguistic and cultural traditions throughout the world and inspire solidarity based on understanding, tolerance and dialogue;

(3)         acknowledges and commends the Speak Greek in March campaign;

(4)         acknowledges that the Speak Greek in March campaign aims to encourage the greater use of the Greek language at home, in the month of March; and

(5)         in collaboration with relevant organisations of the Greek community, undertakes a campaign to establish March as the month during which individuals and organisations endeavour to conduct most of their communications at home and in public in the Greek language.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      13    Baha’is in Iran: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Brodtmann —That this House:

(1)         notes the widespread and systematic campaign of persecution of Baha’is in Iran, with more than 110 Baha’is currently imprisoned due to their religious beliefs;

(2)         condemns the treatment of Baha’is in Iran, which includes economic and educational discrimination, strict limits on the right to assemble and worship, as well as the threat of raids, arrests and detention or imprisonment;

(3)         commends the recent resolution by the United Nations General Assembly in which it expressed its ‘deep concern at serious ongoing and recurring human rights violations’ in Iran; and

(4)         calls for an end to the persecution of the Baha’is in Iran.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      14    Testing and labelling of food imports: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Parke —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         revelations that certain brands of imported frozen berries grown and/or packaged in China are suspected of having infected Australians with Hepatitis A through contamination with faecal matter;

(b)         that Food Standards Australia and New Zealand presently only require 5 per cent of frozen berries imported into Australia to be tested and even then, not for Hepatitis A;

(c)         that local berry growers are subject to demanding chemical and biological testing and inspection procedures at the growers’ expense;

(d)         that consumers who want to know where their food comes from face confusing country of origin labelling, for instance, the words ‘made in Australia’ can mean that all of the ingredients are made or grown elsewhere but are packaged in Australia;

(e)         that this is an important public health issue demanding a strong Government response in the areas of food standards and food labelling; and

(f)          that consumers are entitled to have:

                                                          (i)       confidence that the food they buy for themselves and their children is safe; and

                                                        (ii)       detailed information as to its ingredients and origins; and

(2)         calls on the Government to ensure comprehensive testing of food imports to Australia and appropriate labelling of food with regard to ingredients and origin.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      15    Mobile Black Spot Programme: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has committed $100 million (GST exclusive) over four years to the delivery of the Mobile Black Spot Programme (MBSP);

(b)         the MBSP is expected to provide around 250 to 300 new or upgraded mobile base stations across Australia;

(c)         more than 6,000 locations around Australia have been nominated by the public, local councils, state government, community representatives and businesses as having ineffective or non-existent mobile phone reception; and

(d)         the future viability and safety of communities in rural Australia and the electoral division of lndi are dependent on effective mobile phone coverage; and

(2)         calls on the Government to allocate significant additional funding to the MBSP in 2015-16 to provide additional new and upgraded mobile base stations across Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      16    Development of Northern Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr E. T. Jones —That this House notes that:

(1)         this Government is committed to delivering a White Paper on Developing Northern Australia that will set out a clear and well defined policy platform for unlocking the potential of the north, including consideration of the recommendations of the final report of the Inquiry into the Development of Northern Australia;

(2)         providing customs and border security at Townsville Airport is in line with one of the recommendations in the Development of Northern Australia final report;

(3)         the extra benefits to trade and tourism are important to opening Townsville to the international market and continuing Townsville’s strong economic position in Northern Australia;

(4)         this Government is committed to creating more local jobs and opportunities for the North Queensland community; and

(5)         this continues the Government mantra of being open for business, and under new management.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      17    International Women’s Day: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that International Women’s Day:

(a)         will be celebrated globally on Sunday, 8 March 2015;

(b)         is a day to celebrate the economic, political and social achievements of women, and to review how far women have come in their struggle for equality, peace and development; and

(c)         in 2015 will reflect on the Beijing Platform for Action, a progressive blueprint for advancing women’s rights launched 20 years ago at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         at the launch of Beijing +20 in 2014, United Nations Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka identified that a number of critical areas for women raised in Beijing 20 years ago still require significant action to address, including:

                                                          (i)       reducing women’s share of poverty;

                                                        (ii)       improving access to health and education;

                                                       (iii)       ending violence against women;

                                                      (iv)       ensuring women’s full participation in decision-making;

                                                        (v)       ensuring women’s equal opportunities in the economy;

                                                      (vi)       removing gender stereotypes;

                                                     (vii)       increasing women’s role in the media; and

                                                   (viii)       protecting the human rights of all women and girls; and

(3)         urges all Members of Parliament to be leaders in their community and act on the advancement of gender equality in Parliament. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      18    Protection of civilians: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Thomson —That this House:

(1)         stresses the superiority of collective security through the United Nations over unilateral action or ‘coalition of the willing’ type adventurism, and strongly supports the ‘responsibility to protect’ principle as a vehicle to protect civilians; and

(2)         urges the Government to:

(a)         encourage the United Nations to establish peacekeeping forces in the world’s trouble spots to protect civilians and to extinguish conflicts before they escalate in ways which potentially draw in Australia; and

(b)         implement the recommendations of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade regarding the establishment of a mediation unit within the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to assist in resolving intrastate and interstate disputes before they develop into open conflict (similar to the Norwegian model).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      19    Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and human rights: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr C. A. Laundy —That this House notes that the:

(1)         United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) released its report in March 2014;

(2)         report found that ‘systemic, widespread and gross human rights violations have been and are being committed by the DPRK, its institutions and officials’ against its own people, including:

(a)         violations of the:

                                                          (i)       freedoms of thought, expression and religion;

                                                        (ii)       freedom of movement and residence; and

                                                       (iii)       right to food and related aspects of the right to life;

(b)         discrimination;

(c)         arbitrary detention, torture, executions and prison camps; and

(d)         abductions and enforced disappearances from other countries;

(3)         report found that crimes against humanity have been committed in the DPRK ‘pursuant to policies established at the highest level of the State’; and

(4)         Government:

(a)         welcomes the United Nations Security Council’s decision on 23 December 2014 to include a standing agenda item on the situation in the DPRK under which it can continue to consider the dire human rights situation; and

(b)         continues to call on the DPRK to:

                                                          (i)       treat it citizens in accordance with human rights standards; and

                                                        (ii)       create the conditions for meaningful inter-Korean dialogue and Six Party Talks, including honouring DPRK commitments to denuclearise and demonstrating good faith, such as participating in inter-Korean family reunions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      20    Multinational tax avoidance: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the Government’s failure to tackle multinational profit shifting in Australia;

(b)         every dollar that is avoided by multinational companies must be paid for by Australian taxpayers and businesses, or by cutting services; and

(c)         that unfair tax arrangements distort investment decisions and put local companies at a disadvantage against international conglomerates;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the $1.1 billion of multinational tax measures that the Government has handed back to large multinationals, including:

                                                          (i)       $280 million in reforms to the offshore banking unit regime;

                                                        (ii)       $113 million in legislative elements to improve tax compliance;

                                                       (iii)       $140 million from not proceeding with changes to rules applying to multiple entry consolidated groups; and

                                                      (iv)       $600 million from the abolition of section 25 to 90 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 ;

(b)         the Treasurer’s laggard implementation of the new G20 reporting standard behind the group of 40 ‘early adopters’;

(c)         the $200 million and thousands of staff cuts from the Australian Taxation Office which severely limit its compliance and investigative power; and

(d)         the significant gap between this Government’s rhetoric and its actions when it comes to ensuring multinationals pay their fair share of tax; and

(3)         calls on the Treasurer to bring the same zeal to stopping multinational tax avoidance that he brings to his budget cuts on Australia’s least well off.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      21    Complementary medicines and practices: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Matheson —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of complementary medicines and practices, including traditional Chinese medicines, to the international healthcare landscape;

(b)         that the Australian complementary medicines industry is worth over $3.8 billion; and

(c)         that Australia is the first western nation to nationally regulate Chinese medicine practitioners; and

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), hosted by the University of Western Sydney, as Australia’s premier research facility in complementary medicine, being the only Australian complementary medicine research centre to receive the top ranking of five in the Commonwealth Excellence in Research for Australia scheme; and

(b)         the role of the NICM in fostering collaboration and engagement with Chinese hospitals, research centres and universities to provide trade, research and investment opportunities in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      22    Auschwitz memorial: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Danby —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         27 January 2015 marked the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz by the allies;

(b)         over a million Jews and 150,000 non-Jews were murdered in the Auschwitz death camp; and

(c)         27 January has since become International Holocaust Day, and is marked by ceremonies around the world acknowledging the horrific nature of the official policy of genocide against Jews that was manifested in the Holocaust and that claimed 6 million lives;

(2)         calls on all Australians to remember these crimes against humanity in order to ensure Australia’s continuing condemnation of any attempts to repeat such horrors; and

(3)         in light of Australia having one of the largest groups of Holocaust survivors and the bipartisan support for the previous government’s legacy to the maintenance of the memorial of the camp, calls on Australia to keep a representative on the international committee that supervises the maintenance of the memorial at Auschwitz.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      23    Canned hunting: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Wood —That this House:

(1)         condemns:

(a)         ‘canned hunting’ where animals are raised in captivity for the purpose of being killed in the name of trophy kills; and

(b)         the importation of any species (body or part) in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) appendixes I, II or III as a result of a canned hunt;

(2)         congratulates the Australian Government for introducing new measures to tighten controls on the trade of rhinoceros to tackle illegal trade of this threatened species;

(3)         welcomes Australian Government consideration of actions to improve the protection of African lions by preventing imports of lion trophies obtained through illegal hunting; and

(4)         notes that:

(a)         the CITES lays down guidelines on the importation of all trophy kills, and the Department of the Environment uses this information as its guide in Australia;

(b)         although CITES is legally binding on the parties, it does not take the place of national laws; and

(c)         as a signatory to CITES, the Australian Government is committed to the protection of wildlife that may be adversely affected by trade.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      24    Reclink National Program funding: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Danby —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that the Reclink National Program (RNP) has delivered over 100,000 participation opportunities to thousands of people experiencing disadvantage across Australia, in partnership with over 450 community organisations;

(b)         that there is no other organisation in Australia with the expertise, capacity and capability of effectively and efficiently providing over 100,000 participation opportunities every year to the most disenfranchised, disadvantaged and forgotten Australians; and

(c)         widespread community concern at the diminishing resources to support people experiencing disadvantage, many of whom have relied upon the RNP for social participation and social inclusion through engagement with sport and recreation programs; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reinstate funding to the RNP.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      25    Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that Marine National Park (Green) Zones as defined in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003 serve to better protect the biodiversity within the Marine Park and help to ensure:

(a)         the continued existence of the unique marine animals, plants and habitats that are found only in the Great Barrier Reef and provide additional protection for threatened species such as dugong and marine turtles;

(b)         those industries that rely on the health of the Marine Park are able to continue, providing social and economic benefits to local communities and the wider economy;

(c)         a diverse range of other benefits and values of the Marine Park, including recreational, cultural, educational and scientific values, are protected;

(d)         that future generations are able to continue to use and enjoy the Marine Park;

(e)         the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage values are protected; and

(f)          the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources by traditional owners consistent with their traditional practices, are provided for;

(2)         accepts that Marine National Park (Green) Zones can be beneficial in:

(a)         protecting spawning areas and nursery grounds;

(b)         minimising damage to important habitats;

(c)         providing refuge for protected species, such as turtles and dugongs;

(d)         boosting species numbers, which helps the food web as a whole;

(e)         increasing the abundance of fish; and

(f)          building the resilience of the reef against threats such as climate change and water pollution;

(3)         affirms the Native Title Act 1993 which recognises the right of certain traditional owners to hunt and gather in their sea country and that native title holders may undertake traditional use of marine resources;

(4)         recognises that the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is working with traditional owners for the protection of the Great Barrier Reef, by expanding the Traditional Use of the Marine Resources Agreement program and strengthening communications between local communities, managers and reef stakeholders;

(5)         acknowledges the value of the Ranger Program in providing job opportunities for Indigenous people to care for their country, take on important skills, develop career pathways, protect dugongs and turtles and manage environmental threats stemming from feral animals, among other benefits;

(6)         calls on the:

(a)         Australian Labor Party and the Greens to pass the Environment Legislation Amendment Bill 2013 which will enable a tripling of penalties for those poaching turtles and/or dugongs; and

(b)         relevant parties to work, as a priority, with traditional owners to progressively increase the protections afforded to threatened species, such as turtle and dugong, through traditional use marine resource agreements and other appropriate means, seeking to:

                                                          (i)       where traditional rights under the Native Title Act 1993 apply, seek agreement with traditional owners to prohibit the capture and killing of any species from designated Green Zones within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park area;

                                                        (ii)       continue to allow certain activities to take place with a permit, such as research and management programs for fauna and flora where they pose a threat to humans or the environment, as per existing regulations; and

                                                       (iii)       introduce legislation to prohibit the taking of marine species, including seabirds, in designated Green Zones within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Area, where other efforts have proven to be inadequate;

(7)         in the interest of supporting the policing of turtle and dugong product that is transported for commercial purposes, prohibit the movement of native species, taken under the Native Title Act 1993 outside the area in which it is caught; and

(8)         recognises that these initiatives would complement a range of measures already being implemented under the Government’s Turtle and Dugong Protection Plan and Community Management Plans, which will enhance the protection of marine turtles and dugongs in Far North Queensland and the Torres Strait.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      26    Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, which aims to raise awareness among Australian women of the symptoms of ovarian cancer; and

(b)         each year 1400 Australian women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and more than 1000 will die from the disease—that is one woman every 8 hours;

(2)         notes with concern that the prognosis for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is generally poor due to the advanced stage of most ovarian cancers at the time of diagnosis;

(3)         acknowledges that there is no screening program or detection test for ovarian cancer, and that the Pap smear will not detect the disease;

(4)         recognises that:

(a)         ovarian cancer is not a silent disease and that all women experience symptoms, even in the early stages of the cancer; and

(b)         the four most common symptoms are:

                                                          (i)       abdominal or pelvic pain;

                                                        (ii)       increased abdominal size or persistent abdominal bloating;

                                                       (iii)       needing to urinate often or urgently; and

                                                      (iv)       difficulty eating or feeling full quickly;

(5)         understands that every Australian woman needs to know the symptoms of ovarian cancer; and

(6)         notes the need for greater focus on education and additional research funding to help Australian scientists to find early detection markers and more effective treatments for this disease.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      27    Shop Small month: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         November was Shop Small month;

(b)         Shop Small is an annual event designed to encourage people to explore their local small businesses;

(c)         small business is a major driver of both employment and production; and

(d)         shopping locally helps to ensure a vibrant local community and a stronger local economy;

(2)         acknowledges the many people who went out to support local business during Shop Small month; and

(3)         encourages people to shop locally this Christmas.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      28    Square Kilometre Array radio telescope project: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Mrs K. L. Andrews —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the key role that Australia is playing in the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project to build the world’s largest radio telescope;

(2)         welcomes the recent news that the CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope in Western Australia, an important precursor to the international SKA, has been trialled very successfully with encouraging results;

(3)         recognises the technology employed in this ground breaking project has potential applications extending far beyond radio astronomy; and

(4)         congratulates the Australian scientists, led by SKA Australia Director, Professor Brian Boyle, working with the international community on this project.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      29    Lung Health Awareness Month: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         notes that November is Lung Health Awareness Month;

(2)         acknowledges that lung disease contributes to more than 10 per cent of the overall health burden in Australia, and was the cause of:

(a)         20,376 deaths in 2012, almost 14 per cent of all deaths;

(b)         276,505 hospitalisations in 2011-12, representing 3 per cent of all hospitalisations; and

(c)         more than 1.4 million hospital patient-days in 2011-12, over 5 per cent of all patient days;

(3)         recognises that at least 1 in 10 Australians will be affected by lung disease;

(4)         takes note of the new initiative launched by Lung Foundation Australia (LFA), Just One Breath, which explores the extraordinary things that can be done with just one breath;

(5)         shares the message with constituents, friends, family and other loved ones, to get everyone thinking about their own lung health, and encourages them to visit www.justonebreath.com.au and share the champions’ stories; and

(6)         commends the work of LFA in raising awareness, supporting those affected by lung disease, developing clinical resources and supporting research to find a cure for lung disease.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      30    Coastal shipping: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Mr Hutchinson —That this House:

               (l)    acknowledges the detrimental results of the former Labor Government’s coastal shipping regulatory changes introduced between 2009 and 2012 which have significantly impacted on Tasmania;

              (2)    agrees that the number of major Australian registered ships with coastal shipping licenses fell from 30 in 2006-07 to just 13 in 2012-13;

              (3)    recognises that the Coastal Trading (Revitalising Australian Shipping) Act 2012 adversely affected the Australian maritime industry, with Tasmania losing its international shipping service because of changes to cabotage;

              (4)    recognises the great potential of a coastal trading sector unconstrained by needless red tape and distorted shipping arrangements;

              (5)    notes the review into coastal shipping undertaken as a matter of priority by the Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development with its findings currently being considered by the Minister’s office; and

              (6)    urges the House to reform the Coastal Trading (Revitalising Australian Shipping) Act 2012 to mitigate the damage that has already occurred, particularly in the state of Tasmania.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      31    International Year of Solidarity with the Palestinian People: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou —That this House:

(1)         notes that as of 1977, the United Nations made 29 November the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People;

(2)         recognises 2014 as the United Nations International Year of Solidarity with the Palestinian People (IYSPP); and

(3)         acknowledges the objective of the IYSPP was to promote solidarity with the Palestinian people as a central theme, contributing to international awareness of:

(a)         core themes regarding the Question of Palestine, as prioritised by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People;

(b)         obstacles to the ongoing peace process, particularly those requiring urgent action such as settlements, Jerusalem, the blockade of Gaza and the humanitarian situation in the occupied Palestinian territory, and;

(c)         mobilisation of global action towards the achievement of a comprehensive, just and lasting solution of the Question of Palestine in accordance with international law and the relevant resolutions of the United Nations.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      32    Cyclone Tracy and Darwin: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that 24 December marks 40 years since Cyclone Tracy devastated Darwin, killing 71 people and destroying 70 per cent of buildings, including 80 per cent of residential homes, leaving homeless 41,000 of the 47,000 people living in Darwin;

(2)         recognises the enormous Commonwealth contribution in providing extensive resources to perform the rescue and evacuation of survivors and for the rebuild of Darwin, including:

(a)         the Royal Australian Navy undertaking its largest peacetime relief operations with HMA Ships Balikpapan, Betano, Brunei, Hobart, Melbourne, Stalwart, Stuart, Supply, Tarakan, Vendetta and Wewak berthing in early January 1975 to join HMA Ships Brisbane and Flinders;

(b)         naval personnel spending 17,979 man days ashore during January 1975, with up to 1,200 onshore at the peak of operations working to re-build Darwin; and

(c)         the evacuation of approximately 30,000 of the 45,000 Darwin residents in the days after the disaster thanks to the Royal Australian Air Force and Qantas; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the estimated damage to Darwin was $837 million dollars in 1974 dollars;

(b)         the resilience of Territorians is remarkable;

(c)         Cyclone Tracy was a defining moment in the history of Darwin—a city that had already been rebuilt after the 1942 Japanese bombings and natural disasters in the years preceding World War II; and

(d)         today Darwin is a thriving city and is looking forward to maximising future opportunities, particularly around Developing Northern Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      33    Early childhood education: Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Ellis —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         importance of quality early childhood education in preparing children for school, and the overwhelming evidence of the positive impact that access to kindergarten and preschool has on life outcomes; and

(b)         growing evidence of the enormous social and economic returns that are generated by investment in quality early childhood education;

(2)         recognises the progress that has been made in increasing access to kindergarten and preschool since the National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education was introduced in 2008, including:

(a)         an increase in the proportion of Australian children who attend 15 hours of quality early childhood education in the year before school from just 12 per cent in 2008, to over 56 per cent in 2012; and

(b)         evidence that Australian children who access quality early education for 15 hours a week go on to score significantly better in Year Three NAPLAN tests and achieve higher results in Year Four reading, maths and science;

(3)         notes the uncertainty surrounding future funding for kindergarten and preschool and understands the impact this has on the sector, teachers, educators and parents balancing work and family; and

(4)         calls on the Government to provide certainty of funding for kindergartens and preschools, with the continued goal of ensuring every child receives 15 hours of quality early education a week in the year before school.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

      34    Dung beetles: Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 ) on the motion of Mr Randall —That this House notes that:

(1)         dung beetles:

(a)         provide an important service to Australia’s agricultural sector; and

(b)         act as a biological solution that assists in fly control and enhances livestock health;

(2)         the work of dung beetles acts to enhance and improve the nutrients in soil, leading to natural fertilisation and reducing nutrient runoff;

(3)         greater recognition by industry of the beetles’ importance may lead to further widespread adoption;

(4)         investigation and research into the introduction of two new species of beetles from France and Spain may provide opportunities to expand the beneficial impacts of dung beetles by increased activity during the spring months, and this could bridge the existing activity gap prior to the activity of native beetles in the summer months; and

(5)         agricultural research and development organisations could provide important support in researching the benefits and quarantine implications associated with importing these two new species.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

      35    School funding: Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         Government’s 2014-15 budget contains the biggest ever cut to schools, leaving classrooms across the country $30 billion worse off over the next decade;

(b)         Government has failed to fund the vital fifth and sixth years of the Gonski reforms and has opened the door to state and territory cuts by promising not to enforce their obligations under the Gonski agreements;

(c)         Government has restricted school funding changes to the Consumer Price Index from 2018; and

(d)         importance of equity and quality—for every child in every school—in improving student results and building a prosperous future; and

(2)         calls on the Government to recognise the Commonwealth’s role in funding schools by:

(a)         keeping its commitment to honour the signed Gonski agreements; and

(b)         reversing its $30 billion cut to schools.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )