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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notice given for Tuesday, 26 May 2015

    *1    Mrs Elliot : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         over 105,000 Australians are currently defined as homeless throughout the nation;

(b)         on any given night this translates to 1 in 200 Australians homeless or sleeping rough;

(c)         great work is done by organisations such as Homelessness Australia and countless local charities in their support for homeless people right across the country; and

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the current Government has made significant cuts to front line youth services putting more young people at the risk of homelessness;

(b)         the current Government has made significant cuts to domestic violence services putting more woman and children at risk of homelessness; and

(c)         more needs to be done to address homelessness in Australia.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2015. )

Notice given for Monday, 1 June 2015

         1    Mr Palmer : To present a Bill for an Act to prevent the disclosure of information by public officials in circumstances that may lead to the imposition of the death penalty in foreign countries, and for related purposes. ( Foreign Death Penalty Offences (Preventing Information Disclosure) Bill 2015 )

              ( Notice given 12 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

Notices —continued

       1    Dr Leigh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the rise in inequality over the past generation in Australia as:

(a)         earnings have grown three times as fast for those in the top 10 per cent as for those in the bottom 10 per cent;

(b)         the income share of the top 1 per cent of Australians has doubled over the past generation while the income share of the top 0.1 per cent has tripled; and

(c)         the richest 50 people in Australia have more wealth than the bottom 2 million and the richest 3 people have more wealth than the bottom 1 million, but according to independent reports, inequality plateaued from 2007-2013 under the former Labor Government;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         in Australia, our federal system means that we reach back to help prevent those in need from falling behind;

(b)         ‘simplified government’ should not become a euphemism for service cuts and sliding standards across our health and education systems;

(c)         federalism is a fundamentally egalitarian way of structuring a nation;

(d)         if we dismantle or drastically alter that structure, we can expect to see rising inequality between places just as we’ve seen it rising between people in recent decades;

(e)         unless Australia consciously re-focuses on equality as our shared goal, we will create a more unequal and divided future; and

(f)          a more unequal society is a more immobile society; and

(3)         calls on the Coalition Government to protect the integrity and fairness of our Federation and to preserve the egalitarian culture of Australia by:

(a)         maintaining funding and support for essential community services;

(b)         supporting states and territories in times when they are doing it tough;

(c)         renewing and sustaining our hundred-year-old Federation for the future; and

(d)         not allowing the Commonwealth to become a place of ‘hoarded wealth’.

              ( Notice given 24 November 2014. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 1 June 2015. )

       2    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the leadership of Western Australia in establishing the Population Health Research Network (PHRN) to enable health data from around the nation to be brought together for vital health research; and

(2)         calls on the Minister for Health to:

(a)         allow the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, Medicare, childhood immunisation, aged care, and other Commonwealth health data to be linked through this network through enduring linkages; and

(b)         heed the advice of leaders in population health such as Professor D’Arcy Holman, who says that the Commonwealth’s decision not to contribute its data to the PHRN ‘has again blinded us to the truth of the health system and denies us what would have been a powerful paradigm-shifting tool for public accountability for our $140 billion spend per year’.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2014. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 1 June 2015. )

       3    Mr Hayes : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         tensions have increased in the long standing maritime and territorial disputes in the South China Sea which is being contested by six governments, namely China, Vietnam, Brunei, Taiwan, Malaysia and the Philippines;

(b)         in 2002, parties to the dispute signed a Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (the Declaration), which provides guidelines for managing tensions over this area;

(c)         the Declaration proposed the drafting of a code of conduct between the parties, which to date has not eventuated;

(d)         on 1 May 2014, China deployed an oil rig in the vicinity of the Paracel and Spratly islands;

(e)         significant demonstrations by Vietnamese citizens have occurred regarding this encroachment in this disputed territory; and

(f)          to date, the Philippines is the only country to have filed a submission against China’s territorial claims in the region—a submission was filed in 2013 to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and another to the United Nations Permanent Court of Arbitration in early 2014; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         affirm that whilst Australia does not have any competing claims in the South China Sea, it has a strong interest in promoting peace and stability in the region;

(b)         encourage claimants to this territorial dispute to refrain from using force or threat, and to resolve their claims of sovereignty through peaceful negotiations in accordance with international law, including the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea; and

(c)         request parties to negotiate and adopt a binding regional code of conduct as specified under the Declaration which all parties signed in 2002.

              ( Notice given 2 December 2014. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       4    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that two Australians, Mr Myuran Sukumarun and Mr Andrew Chan, are presently imprisoned in Kerobokan prison in Indonesia and are facing execution for the crime of drug trafficking;

(b)         the serious nature of Mr Sukumarun’s and Mr Chan’s crimes, befitting lengthy prison terms as just punishments for them;

(c)         Australia’s abolition of capital punishment, the international trend away from capital punishment, and the success of Indonesia’s efforts to save the lives of its own citizens sentenced to death in foreign jurisdictions;

(d)         the genuine remorse demonstrated by Mr Sukumaran and Mr Chan and their efforts at rehabilitation and reform in Kerobokan Prison, not only for themselves but also for other prisoners; and

(e)         the widespread support of the Australian people for the commutation of the death sentences for Mr Sukumuran and Mr Chan to lengthy prison sentences, as shown in the recent campaigns across the country calling for mercy to be shown to them; and

(2)         calls on Indonesia to:

(a)         give consideration to the circumstances of Mr Sukumaran and Mr Chan and their rehabilitation in prison, their suffering and that of their families, and commute their sentences to an appropriate term of imprisonment; and

(b)         implement the decision of the Indonesian Constitutional Court in the 2007 case of Ms Edith Sianturi, Mr Scott Rush and others, which recommended that the death penalty should no longer be the primary form of punishment in Indonesia, and that it should be able to be imposed with a prohibition period of ten years, so that if the prisoner shows good behaviour, it can be amended to a lifelong sentence or imprisonment for 20 years.

              ( Notice given 9 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       5    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That this House condemns the Minister for Agriculture for:

(1)         failing to:

(a)         act to save regional business Serana (WA) Pty Ltd (Serana), and the jobs of 16 West Australians; and

(b)         oversee the proper administration of his department; and

(2)         making the entirely unsubstantiated statement that Serana had been importing serum from overseas.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       6   Dr Leigh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC) has been protecting Australians from scammers and streamlining reporting requirements for charities since its establishment by Labor in 2012; and

(b)         during this time it has added nearly 60,000 charities to Australia’s first national charities Register, investigated and revoked the charity status of five organisations for running charity scams, and deregistered over 1,000 inactive charities, ensuring Australians can donate with confidence to local charities and not-for-profit organisations;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australian not-for-profit organisations have voiced overwhelming support for the ACNC, with surveys in both 2013 and 2014 showing that four in five charities back the ACNC, and an open letter to the Prime Minister indicating the strong support of many prominent charities; and

(b)         both a Senate inquiry and consultations by the Department of Social Services have found that a majority of Australian charities would prefer to remain under the regulatory supervision of the ACNC instead of any of the alternatives proposed by the former Minister for Social Services; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         permanently walk away from its efforts to abolish the ACNC;

(b)         provide certainty for the Australian charity sector by publicly committing to retain the ACNC; and

(c)         encourage Coalition-run states and territories to engage with the ACNC to reduce duplicate reporting, and allow charities to spend more time helping the community.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       7    Ms Brodtmann : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         annual Geneva Summit for Human Rights and Democracy is taking place on 24 February 2014; and

(b)         Summit will highlight the kidnapping of nearly 300 girls by Boko Haram in Nigeria in April 2014, with one of the students who escaped speaking out for the first time; and

(2)         condemns the cruel and barbaric actions of Boko Haram, of which the recently reported massacres of thousands in Baga is but one.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       8    Ms King : To move—That the House condemns the Government for:

(1)         promising, before the 2013 election, no cuts to health, but hitting Australians with an unfair GP co-payment after coming to office;

(2)         inflicting untold damage on Australia’s health system through its unfair GP co-payment;

(3)         its ideological attack on Medicare—an attack which will have long term negative impacts on the health of all Australians;

(4)         slugging Australians every time they go to the doctor; and

(5)         scaring Australians, particularly parents and the elderly. 

              ( Notice given 11 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

       9    Ms Rishworth : To move—That the House:

(1)         notes that prior to the 2013 election, the Coalition promised that it would ‘ensure the continuation of the current arrangements of university funding’ but did the exact opposite after the election;

(2)         condemns the Government for its plans to:

(a)         force Australian students to pay $100,000 for university degrees;

(b)         saddle Australian students with a debt sentence;

(c)         force young Australians to choose between owning a home and getting a degree; and

(d)         force Australians to choose between starting a family and getting a degree; and

(3)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         saying one thing on higher education before the election and doing the opposite after; and

(b)         its failure to listen to the Australian people who have comprehensively rejected its plans for $100,000 university degrees.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    10    Mr Feeney : To move—That the House:

(1)         notes the former Minister for Defence promised on 8 May 2013 in relation to Australia’s future submarine project that ‘The Coalition today is committed to building 12 new submarines here in Adelaide’;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         breaking its election promise;

(b)         putting the jobs of thousands of highly skilled Australians at risk; and

(c)         its chaotic and incompetent management of Australia’s future submarine project;

(3)         condemns the Prime Minister for putting his job ahead of the jobs of ordinary Australians by trading their future for votes in his party room; and

(4)         calls on the Government to honour its promise before the election to build Australia’s future submarines in Adelaide.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    11    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         recently released Human Rights Commission report entitled ‘The Forgotten Children’; and

(b)         findings of the Commission that:

                                                          (i)       prolonged detention results in profound negative impacts on the mental and emotional health of children;

                                                        (ii)       immigration detention is a dangerous place for children, with 128 children self-harming, 233 assaults, and 33 reported incidents of sexual assault against children during a 15 month period commencing in January 2013;

                                                       (iii)       Australia is unique in its harsh treatment of asylum seeker children;

                                                      (iv)       holding children in detention does not deter either asylum seekers or people smugglers; and

                                                        (v)       the mandatory and prolonged immigration detention of children is in clear violation of international human rights law;

(2)         resolves that violence and severe mental and emotional distress, assaults and sexual abuse of children are not an acceptable part of Australia’s approach to asylum seekers;

(3)         calls upon the Government to fully implement the recommendations of the Human Rights Commission, including releasing all children in immigration detention and their families into the community as soon as practicable and establishing a royal commission into the long term impact of detention on the health of children in immigration detention; and

(4)         commends the Human Rights Commission for its important work on the report ‘The Forgotten Children’.

              ( Notice given 24 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    12    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it is important:

                                                          (i)       for community trust in our institutions and participatory democracy, that public office holders and institutions established by parliament be allowed to work with independence and impartiality; and

                                                        (ii)       that the executive of government respects the work of independent public office holders particularly when there is disagreement with specific findings; and

(b)         public criticism of independent public office holders by the executive undermines the trust in the executive; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         respect the independence of public office holders; and

(b)         allow public office holders to investigate complaints and report findings to the executive according to law, without political interference.

              ( Notice given 25 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    13    Ms Hall : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Purple Day will be held this year on 26 March to recognise and promote the awareness campaign around epilepsy;

(b)         1 in 26 Australians will develop epilepsy during some stage of their lives;

(c)         the current level of epilepsy treatment is significantly under resourced, and includes an estimated 10 per cent of all patients having poor control over their seizures; and

(d)         rural communities and especially Indigenous communities, are particularly vulnerable to some of the risks associated with having epilepsy because of the danger of driving and travelling long distances; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         recognise the danger and threat presented by the maltreatment of epilepsy;

(b)         advocate strongly in rural Australia, and in particular, Indigenous communities, about the risks associated with having epilepsy;

(c)         develop a national public education program on epilepsy with the help of the Joint Epilepsy Council of Australia; and

(d)         develop programs to help epilepsy sufferers, such as epilepsy friendly workplace environments similar to those provided in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

              ( Notice given 25 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    14    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the 43rd Parliament agreed to the motion introduced by the Member for Denison that contained the following statements, that the then Members of the House:

(a)         acknowledge the large number of mothers and fathers with serious grievances with family law and the child support system;

(b)         note that there has not been a comprehensive review of the child support system since the In the Best Interests of Children—Reforming the Child Support Scheme review in 2005;

(c)         call on the Government to undertake a comprehensive review of family law and the child support system; and

(d)         recommend that the terms of reference for this review be formulated to ensure that the safety and wellbeing of children are paramount;

(2)         further acknowledges that a review never took place;

(3)         notes that, despite the Minister for Social Services requesting an inquiry into the Child Support Program during the 44th Parliament, it is not a holistic and detailed review of both child support and family law; and

(4)         calls on the Government to honour the will of the 43rd Parliament and commission a comprehensive root and branch review of family law and the Child Support Program with a sufficient mandate to effectively consider the interaction between these systems.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    15    Ms Parke : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Government is presently negotiating the text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) with the United States, Japan, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand, Chile, Singapore, Canada, Mexico and Brunei Darussalam;

(b)         the TPP negotiations are shrouded in secrecy, with the media and public interest groups locked out of the process, while ‘cleared advisors’ from industry have had access to the drafts; and

(c)         leaked published drafts of the TPP text indicate that the agreement may contain:

                                                          (i)       Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions, thereby allowing foreign corporations to sue the Australian Government in secretive international pseudo-tribunals made up of corporate lawyers regarding laws, regulations, public policies and court decisions they find inconvenient or which may cause a loss in future profits; and

                                                        (ii)       an intellectual property chapter with proposals on copyright law, trademark law, patent law and data protection that would have extensive ramifications for users’ freedom of speech, right to privacy and due process; greater liability on internet intermediaries; further restrictions on fair use; criminal sanctions; and would expand copyright terms and reduce access to affordable medicines;

(2)         recognises that the ISDS provisions potentially impact negatively upon the ability of Australian governments to pass laws and regulations for the public good, including environmental, labour and health standards, for instance, Australia is presently being sued by Phillip Morris for its plain packing legislation pursuant to an ISDS clause contained in a 1993 Free Trade Agreement with Hong Kong, notwithstanding the fact that the High Court of Australia has upheld the plain packaging laws;

(3)         acknowledges that the international non-government organisation Medecins Sans Frontièrs is campaigning against the TPP due to its concerns about the impact of the TPP on the price and availability of medicines; and

(4)         calls on the Government to ensure full transparency of the TPP negotiations and the opportunity for public consultation and input into the process prior to the Government signing off on the agreement.

              ( Notice given 17 March 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    16    Ms Owens : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         there is a significant, ongoing and growing need for the provision of emergency relief to support vulnerable Australians;

(b)         local organisations such as Holroyd Community Aid (HCA) play a critical role in the delivery of emergency relief services, with HCA having done so for nearly 50 years; and

(c)         volunteers are a crucial and valued part in this;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         increasing the demand for emergency relief services while cutting funding to organisations such as HCA; and

(b)         the lack of certainty that has been created for the community, volunteers, staff and those in need by the way decisions have been made and implemented; and

(3)         calls on the Government to restore funding to HCA.

              ( Notice given 18 March 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    17    Ms Owens : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in North Parramatta there is a phenomenal colonial heritage precinct that rivals any in Australia by far; and

(b)         this precinct houses:

                                                          (i)       Australia’s first female convict factory;

                                                        (ii)       the Parramatta Girls Home; and

                                                       (iii)       a number of rare buildings from Australia’s colonial history in the 1700s;

(2)         condemns the New South Wales Government for:

(a)         its plans to overdevelop the site with buildings of between 6 and 30 storeys high against the base of some of our most significant convict heritage buildings;

(b)         selling off large plots of public land to build these large developments; and

(c)         a complete lack of planning on how it will refurbish the heritage buildings, despite the rapid development around them; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         pause this land grab and consult further with the community; and

(b)         develop a real plan on how the heritage of the site will be preserved.

              ( Notice given 18 March 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    18    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the importation to Australia of goods that:

(a)         breach Australia’s anti-dumping regime; and

(b)         do not comply with Australian standards;

(2)         further notes the:

(a)         injurious effect that the importation of such products has on Australian businesses and Australian jobs;

(b)         risk to consumers of using substandard products and goods; and

(c)         lack of inspection and compliance enforcement of imported products; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         continue to monitor the anti-dumping regime and effectiveness of recent changes;

(b)         strengthen the inspection and compliance enforcement regime for imported goods;

(c)         review penalties for importers who breach their Australian legal obligations and if necessary increase the penalties where they are found to be insufficient, to act as a deterrent; and

(d)         hold an urgent meeting of the International Trade Remedies Forum to address these and related issues.

              ( Notice given 12 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    19    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Australian and Western Australian governments have caused significant distress to the Indigenous peoples by failing to carry out proper community consultation on the withdrawal of Municipal and Essential Services (MES) funding and the proposed forced closure of Aboriginal communities; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         reveal the full details of the agreements made with the states to terminate MES funding for remote Indigenous communities; and

(b)         outline what strategies it has put in place to ensure that its policy will not result in Aboriginal Australians again being forced off their land.

              ( Notice given 12 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    20    Ms Hall : To move—This House:

(1)         notes that this month is May Lyme Project month, a time when the Lyme Disease Association of Australia raises awareness and funds to provide ongoing advocacy for people living with Lyme disease;

(2)         recognises that Lyme disease can be debilitating and have a devastating impact on the lives of people living with it; and

(3)         works with the Lyme disease Association of Australia to accept Lyme disease as a disease, undertake research, develop a national plan to collect statistics and develop treatments for people living with Lyme disease.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    21    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That the House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         a comprehensive and strategic approach to developing Northern Australia is required to boost exports for the growing Asian market and to promote coherent agriculture development across the north;

(b)         high-impact, scientific research is needed to lower barriers to private sector investment and stimulate capital flows to the north;

(c)         a ‘build it and they will come’ approach is not a credible basis for developing Northern Australia;

(d)         the Joint Select Committee on Northern Australia recommended in its ‘Pivot North’ report that a Co-operative Research Centre for northern agriculture was necessary to promote agricultural development across the north; and

(e)         the growNORTH initiative established with state and territory governments and universities had already been significantly progressed, but was stalled last year as a result of Government inaction; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         commit to funding a collaborative research venture in Northern Australia; and

(b)         immediately release the details of the Northern Australia White Paper.

              ( Notice given 14 May 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

Orders of the day

         1    Gambling Harm Reduction (Protecting Problem Gamblers and Other Measures) Bill 2014 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

         2    Tax Laws Amendment (Tax Transparency) Bill 2014 ( Dr Leigh ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

         3    East West Link in Melbourne: Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 —Ms Ryan, in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Henderson —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         the Australian Government will contribute $1.5 billion towards the completion of the western section (Stage Two) of Melbourne’s East West Link;

(b)         the commitment to Stage Two of the East West Link is in addition to the Commonwealth’s $1.5 billion contribution towards the $6 to $8 billion Stage One section of the East West Link; and

(c)         together, Stage One and Stage Two will create some 6,700 construction jobs which are so important for Melbourne, Geelong and south-west Victoria; and

(2)         notes that the:

(a)         East West Link is critical to:

                                                          (i)       easing congestion on the West Gate Bridge and improving Geelong’s transport links to Melbourne;

                                                        (ii)       easing congestion on the Eastern Freeway and alleviating major traffic bottlenecks at Hoddle Street and Alexandra Parade; and

                                                       (iii)       improving freight efficiency and connections for major industries in Melbourne’s outer east, north and south east to the Port of Melbourne and international airports;

(b)         East West Link will never happen under a Labor Government—state Labor opposes the project despite estimates that the cost of Melbourne’s road congestion will grow to $5 billion per annum by 2021 and $7.2 billion by 2031, more than double current levels; and

(c)         Victorian Leader of the Opposition has described the East West Link as a ‘grand hoax’ and has threatened to rip up any contracts that are signed in respect of the project and in doing so, has shown contempt for the people of Victoria.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

         4    Family violence: Resumption of debate ( from  24 November 2014 —Mrs Prentice, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         with concern that family violence is an issue affecting members of all of our communities, but that not enough attention is given to it in public debate;

(b)         that the impact of family violence upon our communities is devastating, especially given:

                                                          (i)       intimate partner violence is responsible for more ill-health and premature death in women in Victoria under age 45 than high blood pressure, obesity and smoking; and

                                                        (ii)       one in three women since their teenage years have been exposed to violence, one in five have been exposed to sexual violence, and one woman per week is killed by her partner or former partner;

(c)         the importance of a bipartisan approach in addressing such a complex issue and support for addressing family violence by all Members of Parliament within the House; and

(d)         with support the creation of the Parliamentarians Against Family Violence friendship group, and acknowledges the success of its launch event on 20 October; and

(2)         makes all efforts to raise awareness of the family violence taking place in our communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 1 June 2015. )

         5    Sex Discrimination Amendment (Boosting Superannuation for Women) Bill 2014 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         6    Apology to the Forgotten Australians and former child migrants: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House notes:

(1)         that 16 November 2014 marked the 5th anniversary of an important milestone in Australia’s history, when the Australian Government delivered its formal apology to the Forgotten Australians and former child migrants;

(2)         the significant work of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse and the inquiry’s Chair, the Hon. Justice Peter McClellan AM, to date in:

(a)         raising public awareness of Forgotten Australians;

(b)         conducting public hearings and private sessions to ensure that the victims’ voices are heard;

(c)         examining abuse in particular institutions across Australia; and

(d)         reporting allegations of child abuse to appropriate authorities; and

(3)         the Government’s commitment to provide additional funding to extend the Royal Commission’s Inquiry.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         7    Trade Training Centres: Resumption of debate ( from  1 December 2014 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth —That this House:

(1)         recognises the critical role that Trade Training Centres (TTCs) play in introducing young people to vocational education at school and assisting them to achieve vocational education and training (VET) qualifications;

(2)         acknowledges that TTCs have enabled schools to provide greater and more diverse opportunities for students completing secondary school;

(3)         accepts the important role that TTCs play in ensuring that young people get the vocational skills they require and in conjunction, are able to achieve a secondary school certificate that otherwise may not have been possible;

(4)         supports the industry partnerships between registered training organisations, schools and VET providers that have prospered through the introduction of TTCs;

(5)         condemns the Government’s $950 million cut to the TTC program; and

(6)         urges the Government to honour its commitment to support existing TTCs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         8    China-Australia Free Trade Agreement: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Ms F. M. Scott —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the University of Western Sydney (UWS) and the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (BUCM) signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) as part of the landmark China-Australia Free Trade Agreement, and the forged relationship will provide:

                                                          (i)       broader and improved healthcare options as a result of the clinical and research trials conducted by the UWS’s National Institute of Complementary Medicine and the BUCM to validate and translate Chinese medicines into an integrated healthcare setting;

                                                        (ii)       the international framework for Australia to become the leading western accreditor of the $170 billion dollar global traditional Chinese medicine market; and

                                                       (iii)       formalised connections with the internationally regarded researchers at the BUCM which will further enhance the reputation of the UWS as a leading centre of research excellence that delivers practical social and economic outcomes for the residents of Western Sydney;

(b)         the MOU between these two universities was among 14 commercial agreements signed between Australia and China, and will secure unprecedented levels of market access to the world’s second largest economy, with a population of 1.36 billion and a rapidly growing middle class; and

(c)         households and businesses will also reap the benefits of cheaper goods and components imported from China, placing downward pressure on the cost of living and the cost of doing business; and

(2)         commends the Government on its approach to securing a historic free trade agreement between Australia and China.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

         9    Syrian refugees: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Parke —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Syrian conflict which began in March 2011 has:

                                                          (i)       developed into one of the worst humanitarian disasters of our time; and

                                                        (ii)       caused widespread damage to infrastructure across Syria, with basic necessities such as food, water and medical care difficult or impossible to access;

(b)         serious human rights violations remain a common occurrence in Syria;

(c)         it is estimated that more than 190,000 people have lost their lives in the Syrian conflict so far;

(d)         in the three and a half years since the beginning of the Syrian conflict, more than 3.5 million refugees have fled their homes and crossed into neighbouring countries, while the United Nations estimates a further 6.5 million are displaced within Syria itself, representing an increase of 2 million in just six months;

(e)         hosting the Syrian refugees has put enormous pressure on the infrastructure, services, utilities and local populations of the host countries of Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, with Syrian refugees in Lebanon now constituting approximately one-third of the population, and unemployment among poor Lebanese rising significantly;

(f)          the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has encouraged the international community to share the burden of supporting Syrian refugees, having a target for resettlement of 130,000 by the end of 2016, but has received a minimal response to date with less than 2 per cent of the registered refugee population having secured a resettlement place;

(g)         while the regional response to the crisis should be commended, the global response has been relatively weak;

(h)         the United Nations issued its largest appeal in relation to a single crisis in December 2013, stating that $6.5 billion was vital to adequately support Syrians inside and outside of the conflict-ravaged nation, but to date the appeal has only raised 62 per cent of that target; and

(i)           in December 2014 the United Nations World Food Programme announced that it was suspending its food aid program for Syrian refugees for lack of funding, leaving 1.7 million refugees to go hungry during winter, and has called for US$64 million in immediate assistance to allow the recommencement of this essential aid; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         reconsider the level of Australia’s existing humanitarian support and funding to assist those affected by the Syrian crisis with a view to making a significantly larger contribution;

(b)         offer direct support to neighbouring countries, including through funding and arrangements to receive additional refugees in Australia by expanding the existing quota of asylum seekers and focusing resettlement on those Syrian refugees recommended by the UNHCR on the basis of vulnerability; and

(c)         take an active role in all relevant multilateral fora in calling for a more substantial and better coordinated global response, including a ‘fair share’ approach to the resettlement of refugees.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      10    Medicines and medical devices regulations: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That this House:

(1)         recognises the opportunities for an enhanced regulatory framework to better position Australia’s health system to respond effectively to global trends in the development, manufacture, marketing and regulation of therapeutic goods, and to improve access to vital life saving and enhancing drugs;

(2)         commends the recent joint announcement by the Minister for Health and Assistant Minister for Health to undertake a review of medicines and medical devices regulations;

(3)         supports the Government’s Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda as a key step to removing ineffective regulation and encouraging greater competition and innovation for businesses in the medicines and medical devices industries; and

(4)         applauds the Prime Minister for his recent Ministerial Statement to the House on deregulation, outlining the need to recognise trusted international approval processes to improve consumer access to therapeutic goods.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      11    Municipal and essential services funding: Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2015 ) on the motion of Ms MacTiernan —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the concern of Aboriginal Western Australians about the sustainability of their remote communities in the wake of the withdrawal of municipal and essential services funding and the need to plan for members of those communities after the withdrawal of funding;

(2)         recognises that local government authorities have not been consulted in any meaningful way by the Government of Western Australia on this change in responsibility and they are deeply concerned that seven months is not sufficient to make workable alternative arrangements; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to delay the withdrawal of funding from this program until 1 July 2016.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      12    Family Day Care funding: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Family Day Care (FDC) is a flexible, quality early education program in Australia that:

                                                          (i)       provides flexible programs that cater to the needs of thousands of working parents;

                                                        (ii)       operates under the National Quality Framework; and

                                                       (iii)       currently has the capacity to care and educate children in their own homes; and

(b)         the Government:

                                                          (i)       is cutting $157 million and implementing changes to the Community Support Program (CSP) that will remove the funding of over 80 per cent of FDC services around Australia; and

                                                        (ii)       informed the FDC sector that the program changes would only impact new applicants, then introduced a budget proposal to apply the new guidelines to all services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         genuinely consult with FDC providers about what sensible rule changes are needed, if any; and

(b)         re-instate CSP funding for all FDC services currently funded under the program.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      13    Peter Greste’s release: Resumption of debate ( from  23 February 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         celebrates the release of Mr Peter Greste by the Egyptian Government;

(2)         commends the Greste family on its courage, resilience and grace for more than 400 days;

(3)         congratulates the Australian Foreign Minister and Prime Minister on their unrelenting pursuit of Mr Greste’s cause;

(4)         commends the efforts of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Egypt under the direction of Mr Justin Brown and Ambassador Dr Ralph King;

(5)         thanks the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi and Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry for their role in Mr Greste’s release;

(6)         calls for the immediate release of Mr Greste’s colleagues, Mr Baher Mohamed and Mr Mohamed Fadel Fahmy;

(7)         recognises the many thousands of ordinary Australians and others around the world that showed their support to the Greste family during the past year; and

(8)         notes that ‘Telling the truth is not terrorism and Journalism is not a crime’.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      14    Imported Food Warning Labels Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      15    Australian Defence Force: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on honouring its election commitment to change indexation arrangements for Defence Forces Retirement Benefits and Defence Force Retirement and Death Benefits military pensions;

(2)         condemns the $17 billion in cuts made to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) under the former Labor Government to its lowest level since before World War II;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         that those budget cuts caused job losses among the 3000 small and medium businesses which service the ADF; and

(b)         the extra risk placed on Australian service personnel by Labor’s failure to purchase new artillery;

(4)         condemns the cuts by the former Labor Government to entitlements of unmarried soldiers for flights to see their families;

(5)         recognises the depletion in force readiness caused by Labor’s reckless decision to cut reserve training days by up to 30 percent; and

(6)         repudiates the decision to cut funding to the Australian War Memorial.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      16    Social services funding: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms O’Neil —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         there is a significant, ongoing and growing need for emergency relief, financial counselling and related programs, to support the most vulnerable Australians;

(b)         local organisations play a critical role in the delivery of these programs around Australia; and

(c)         volunteers are a crucial and valued part of this network;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         cutting core social services to the most vulnerable Australians, while increasing demand for those services through other elements of their unfair budget; and

(b)         the covert way in which funding decisions have been made and implemented; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         restore funding to social services; and

(b)         provide clarity and funding certainty to affected housing, homelessness services, neighbourhood centres, advice bureaus and other community service providers around Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      17    Small businesses and infrastructure investment: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr C. A. Laundy —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         small and medium businesses are the engine room of the Australian economy and employment;

(b)         an effective infrastructure network is essential for small businesses to survive and flourish; and

(c)         investment in improved infrastructure benefits small businesses through economic growth and job creation, and provides a boost to local and regional economies; and

(2)         supports the Government in prioritising infrastructure investment to help small businesses grow and continue their vital contribution to the Australian economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      18    New South Wales Seniors Week: Resumption of debate ( from  16 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         14 to 22 March is New South Wales Seniors Week, a week that acknowledges their contribution to the community;

(b)         older Australians make an enormous contribution to our communities;

(c)         all older Australians deserve to live in dignity; and

(d)         the Government is attacking the standard of living of seniors and pensioners by undermining the pension, benefits to seniors, Medicare and support services for older Australians; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reverse its anti-seniors ageist approach to government and service delivery.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      19    Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment (Regional Australia Statements) Bill 2015 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      20    Melanoma: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Tehan —That this House notes that:

(1)         Melanoma March takes place this month and will involve hundreds of Australians around the country participating in community walks to raise awareness of melanoma;

(2)         12,500 Australians are diagnosed with melanoma each year and 1,650 of those are diagnosed with advanced melanoma;

(3)         advanced melanoma kills more than 1,500 Australians each year—this is one death every six hours;

(4)         melanoma is:

(a)         the most common cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 39 and those diagnosed with advanced melanoma have a median survival of only 8 to 9 months;

(b)         estimated to be the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian males in 2014 (7,440 cases), after prostate and colorectal cancer; and

(c)         also estimated to be the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian females (5,210 cases), after breast and colorectal cancer; and

(5)         advanced melanoma costs hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

      21    Cyclone Pam: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the devastation caused by Cyclone Pam on the people of Vanuatu, Tuvalu and Kiribati;

(2)         recognises the enormous destructive force of Cyclone Pam and notes the loss of life and destruction caused including:

(a)         damage to 90 per cent of Port Vila homes and entire villages across the archipelago;

(b)         displacement of 45 per cent of Tuvalu’s population and significant destruction of the outer islands of Tuvalu; and

(c)         severe damage on three of Kiribati’s southern islands:

(3)         recognises the:

(a)         enormous effort that will be required by governments and non-government emergency teams to find those missing from the disaster; and

(b)         huge task now facing our friends in the Pacific to rebuild and repair following the devastation of Cyclone Pam;

(4)         acknowledges the international effort to provide assistance to Vanuatu; and

(5)         calls on the Australian Government to monitor the situation closely and to work with the governments of Vanuatu, Tuvalu and Kiribati to provide timely and appropriate further assistance as needed.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    *22    Shingles and postherpetic neuralgia: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         recognises that shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) can cause significant and debilitating pain for hundreds of thousands of Australians;

(2)         acknowledges that senior Australians unfortunately bear the brunt of the disease burden, as the frequency and severity of complications increase with age;

(3)         notes that approximately 1 in 3 adults will develop shingles in their lifetime and that the risk of shingles increases with age, particularly after the age of 60;

(4)         recognises there is no cure for shingles and PHN;

(5)         understands that prevention through vaccination represents the most effective opportunity to help reduce the number of Australians suffering from shingles and PHN; and

(6)         acknowledges that preventative health measures such as vaccination will help protect the health of older Australians and safeguard their ability to work, care and volunteer.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

    *23    Death penalty: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Parke —That the House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the execution in Indonesia by firing squad on 29 April 2015 of Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, along with their fellow prisoners, Rodrigo Gularte, Silvester Nwolise, Okwuduli Oyatanze, Raheem Salami, Martin Anderson and Zainal Abidin, and expresses condolences to their families;

(b)         the bipartisan commitment in Australia to see an end to the death penalty worldwide;

(c)         that the evidence overwhelmingly shows that the death penalty is not a more effective deterrent than long term imprisonment;

(d)         that the international trend is clearly away from the practice of the death penalty—in 1977 only 16 countries had abolished the death penalty, now 140 nations have banned the practice; and

(e)         that Australia has the opportunity to influence further progress towards the worldwide abolition of the death penalty in its relationship with key regional and global partners; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         strengthen its efforts to advocate for an end to the death penalty wherever it still occurs; and

(b)         ensure that Australia’s international cooperation is structured to avoid to the extent possible, the potential that such cooperation could lead to a person receiving the death penalty.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 1 June 2015. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).