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13    Notices

Senators Bilyk and Polley: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   the 6th National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence is being held on Friday, 18 March 2016,

                 (ii)   this annual day is Australia’s key anti-bullying event for schools, and encourages all students to ‘take a stand together’ against bullying and violence in schools, the classroom and beyond,

                (iii)   cyberbullying is a serious concern for young Australians, and it can happen at any time where there is access to online technology, and

                (iv)   everyone has a role to play to keep children safe from bullying and violence; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to urgently act to legislate against ‘revenge porn’, which is extremely distressing, demeaning and can lead to real world violence and harassment. ( general business notice of motion no. 1075 )

The Minister for Communications (Senator Fifield): To move on the next day of sitting—That consideration of the business before the Senate on Wednesday, 16 March 2016 be interrupted at approximately 5 pm, but not so as to interrupt a senator speaking, to enable Senator Paterson to make his first speech without any question before the chair.

Senator Singh: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   14 March 2016 marks Commonwealth Day for 2.2 billion people living in 53 countries,

                 (ii)   in 1987, when Commonwealth leaders met in Vancouver, more than 350 000 cases of polio paralysed and killed children in 125 countries annually, and in the following year, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) was formed, bringing together Rotary International, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], the World Health Organization [WHO] and the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund [UNICEF] united in a common cause: to eradicate polio once and for all,

                (iii)   as India and Nigeria have recently been removed from the list of polio endemic countries, polio remains endemic in just one Commonwealth country - Pakistan - where progress has been significant, with 80 per cent fewer cases being recorded in 2015 compared to 2014,

                (iv)   in the words of the new Commonwealth Secretary-General Designate, The Right Honourable Baroness Patricia Scotland, the eradication of polio is ‘an exemplary example of what the Commonwealth can do when it collaborates and works together with focus to bring something about’,

                 (v)   a funding gap of $1.5 billion for implementing the GPEI’s current strategic plan threatens to derail this progress,

                (vi)   investment in polio eradication will yield the ultimate return for future generations of children who will be free of this devastating disease while global health will benefit from the program’s knowledge and experience, as was demonstrated in 2014 when the use of polio infrastructure enabled Nigeria to stop the spread of Ebola,

               (vii)   the full eradication of polio could be the first milestone success of the new Sustainable Development Goals, providing the blueprint for reaching children with life-saving interventions in some of the most remote, vulnerable and socially-excluded communities and living up to the theme of Commonwealth Day 2016 of ‘An Inclusive Commonwealth’, and

              (viii)   at the most recent Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting held in Malta in November 2015, Commonwealth leaders, including Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, agreed to accelerate action and renew financial support to eradicate polio once and for all; and

    (b)   calls on the Australian Government to follow through on this renewed commitment and pledge to the GPEI. ( general business notice of motion no. 1076 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   clean energy is the key to Australia’s future prosperity and supports the jobs, investment and technological innovation that is created in Australia through clean energy technologies,

                 (ii)   Australia was on track to achieve around 28 per cent of its electricity sourced from clean energy in the year 2020 until the Government and Opposition voted together to lower the target to 23 per cent in June 2015, and

                (iii)   as a result of Australia being the first country in the world to have reduced its legislated renewable energy aspirations, no wave of new jobs and construction have commenced 9 months after the passage of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment Act 2015 (the Act), despite significant global capital seeking to invest in the energy systems of the future; and

    (b)   urges energy retailers, Origin Energy and Energy Australia to make their intentions clear whether they will facilitate the imminent construction of new Australian clean energy projects or whether they will pass the penalty price for non-compliance with the Act onto their Australian customers. ( general business notice of motion no. 1077 )

Senator Wang, the Minister for Rural Health (Senator Nash), the Minister for Women (Senator Cash) and Senators Moore and Peris: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes the tragic loss of Sarah Tait, Australian rowing champion, following her battle with cervical cancer;

    (b)   expresses sincere condolences to Sarah’s husband Bill and their children Leila and Luca, Sarah’s parents Simon and Barbara, and Sarah’s family and friends for their loss;

     (c)   expresses gratitude for the important services and support that Sarah and her family received from the Royal Women’s Hospital in Victoria, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and the Caritas Christi Hospice that helped Sarah maintain her quality of life with her children and family;

    (d)   acknowledges that Sarah Tait is an inspiration to all Australians, especially Australian women in sport, having achieved great personal and professional heights, including:

                  (i)   receiving a silver medal in 2000 at the age of 17 for her efforts as part of the Junior Women’s Four at the World Rowing Junior Championships in Croatia,

                 (ii)   competing in the 2004 Athens and the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games,

                (iii)   winning the World Championships in Japan as part of the Women’s Eight in 2005, and winning a silver medal as part of a pair at that same regatta,

                (iv)   securing a bronze medal in the coxless pairs at the World Rowing Championships held in Slovenia in 2011,

                 (v)   winning a silver medal at the 2012 London Olympic Games following the birth of her daughter, Leila,

                (vi)   captaining the Australian women’s rowing team at the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games,

               (vii)   captaining the 2010 and 2011 World Rowing Championships, and

              (viii)   being a positive role model for mothers in professional sport and inspiring Rowing Australia’s family friendly policy, and more broadly cultivating a more family friendly environment for coaches and athletes in competitive sport;

     (e)   notes that cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women, and is sadly one of the most difficult cancers to detect; and

     (f)   acknowledges that the Minister for Health (Ms Ley) will announce the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) advisory board members in the near future, and that the appointment of board members to the MRFF will enable the consideration of further research into the detection, prevention and treatment of rare types of cervical cancer. ( general business notice of motion no. 1078 )

Senator Hanson-Young: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that the week beginning 13 March 2015 marks the 5th anniversary of the beginning of the Syria crisis, and that since the conflict began:

                  (i)   between 250 000 and 470 000 people have lost their lives, and 11 million people have been forced to flee their homes, including 4.5 million refugees,

                 (ii)   the Syrian Government has forcibly ‘disappeared’ at least 65 000 people, including human rights activists and aid workers,

                (iii)   all parties to the conflict have committed war crimes and human rights violations, including murder, torture and rape,

                (iv)   many of those remaining in Syria are struggling to survive without access to lifesaving humanitarian aid due to the actions of warring parties and insufficient funding for humanitarian appeals,

                 (v)   the recent cessation of hostilities and peace talks are a cause for cautious optimism, but the situation on the ground in Syria remains dire for millions of people,

                (vi)   the Australian Government has provided $213 million in aid to the people of Syria since 2011,

               (vii)   the Australian Government in 2015 committed to resettle 12 000 refugees from Syria and Iraq, only 26 of whom have been settled in Australia to date, and

              (viii)   the Australian Government played an important role during 2013-14 on the United Nations Security Council negotiation resolutions aimed at improving humanitarian access for vulnerable populations within Syria; and

    (b)   calls on the Turnbull Government to:

                  (i)   increase diplomatic efforts to demand all parties to the conflict abide by the rules of war and protect civilians,

                 (ii)   provide further humanitarian assistance to vulnerable people inside Syria, as well as refugees who have fled the conflict and are now in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and other countries in the region,

                (iii)   expedite the resettlement of the 12 000 Syrian and Iraqi refugees that the Australian Government committed to resettle in 2015,

                (iv)   take all possible steps to avoid harming civilians during any Australian military operations, and

                 (v)   work to ensure people fleeing Syria are treated fairly, including by increasing assistance to refugee-hosting countries. ( general business notice of motion no. 1079 )

Senator Ludlam: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   the expensive, intrusive and ultimately pointless mandatory telecommunications data retention scheme was introduced in the 2015-16 Budget at a cost to taxpayers of $153.8 million,

                 (ii)   mandatory data retention forces Australian Internet service providers and telecommunications carriers to retain comprehensive records on their customers’ Internet and telephone habits for a period of 2 years,

                (iii)   the full cost of the scheme is in excess of $300 million but costs just 15 cents per day to circumvent via simple steps such as those helpfully articulated by the Prime Minister (Mr Turnbull), and

                (iv)   since the Australian Labor Party supported the Government in passing the bill, the number of additional agencies requesting warrantless access to metadata has included the Australian Taxation Office, the Australian Border Force and the Victorian Racing Integrity Commissioner; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to repeal the scheme. ( general business notice of motion no. 1080 )

Senator Reynolds: To move on the next day of sitting—That the time for the presentation of the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters on its inquiry into the financing of participants in the political process be extended to 22 June 2016. ( general business notice of motion no. 1081 )

Senator Waters: To move on the next day of sitting—That there be laid on the table, no later than 9.45 am on 17 March 2016, the following documents assembled by Dr Alex Wonhas and now held by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) or the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, relating to the restructuring of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division:

    (a)   the written briefing prepared in December 2015 by Dr Ken Lee, Director of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division for submission to the CSIRO executive for the ‘Deep Dive’ meeting;

    (b)   documents from November to December 2015 demonstrating the consultation that was undertaken with the Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship Research Program Leaders in preparing the above briefing;

     (c)   any written communication from Dr Alex Wonhas or Dr Larry Marshall to the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division subsequent to the briefing mentioned in paragraph (a) requesting a proposal for more extensive restructuring;

    (d)   documents from January 2016 demonstrating any consultation that was undertaken by Dr Ken Lee with the Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship Research Program Leaders in developing the proposal for more extensive restructuring;

     (e)   all written communication from December 2015 until the present between the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship and either Dr Wonhas or Dr Marshall in relation to any proposed more extensive restructuring, including:

                  (i)   communications detailing the scope, rationale and implications of the restructuring,

                 (ii)   guidelines or criteria to be used in choosing specific areas to be restructured, and

                (iii)   the rationale for a reduction of 100 equivalent full-time staff;

     (f)   documents from December 2015 until the present demonstrating the consultation process that is being undertaken with the Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship Research Program Leaders, including guidelines or criteria being used, to determine the specific research groups and teams to be restructured;

     (g)   any written briefings for Dr Wonhas or Dr Marshall for the CSIRO executive meeting on or around 27 January 2016 concerning proposed restructuring in the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship;

    (h)   the minutes or other records of any CSIRO board meeting which considered the restructuring of the Oceans and Atmosphere Flagship;

      (i)   all project description and project budget documents for projects concerning the Cape Grim observing station and the associated Gas Lab analysis, for the past 5 years up to and including 2015-16; and

     (j)   any written communication between Dr Marshall and CSIRO staff concerning clean coal technology from November 2015 until the present. ( general business notice of motion no. 1082 )

Senator Waters: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   the Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, stated on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A program that Australia is ‘losing the battle’ against global warming,

                 (ii)   Professor Terry Hughes has told ‘The Conversation’ that Australia can either develop new coal mines or protect the Great Barrier Reef, but ‘we can’t possibly do both’,

                (iii)   coral bleaching caused by global warming has already caused the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority to raise its bleaching alert to Level 2, and the United States’ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has upgraded its Coral Reef Watch warning for the far northern Great Barrier Reef to Alert Level 2, the highest threat level, and

                (iv)   the mining and burning of coal is driving dangerous global warming which threatens the Great Barrier Reef; and

    (b)   calls on the Federal Government to abandon its support for the Adani mega coal mine and Abbot Point coal port expansion, and support a rapid transition to 100 per cent clean energy as soon as possible, and at least 90 per cent clean energy by 2030. ( general business notice of motion no. 1083 )

Senator Cameron: To move on the next day of sitting—That the resolution of the Senate of 15 March 2016 relating to the hours of meeting and routine of business for the week be amended as follows:

    (a)   in paragraph (4) add to the list of bills “Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Australian Workers) Bill 2016 (contingent on introduction)”; and

    (b)   add the following new paragraph “(4)(c) for the purposes of this order, the consideration of the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Australian Workers) Bill 2016 be listed and considered as a government business order of the day”. ( general business notice of motion no. 1084 )

Senator McKim: To move on the next day of sitting—

    (1)   That a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee on Response to Fires in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, be established to inquire into and report, on or before 30 May 2016, on the response to, and lessons learned from, recent fires in remote Tasmanian wilderness affecting the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, with particular reference to:

                 (a)   the impact of global warming on fire frequency and magnitude;

                 (b)   the availability and provision of financial, human and mechanical resources;

                 (c)   the adequacy of fire assessment and modelling capacity;

                 (d)   Australia’s obligations as State Party to the World Heritage Convention;

                 (e)   world best practice in remote area fire management; and

                  (f)   any related matter.

    (2)   That the committee consist of 6 senators, 2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, 2 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, 1 nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens and 1 nominated by other parties and independent senators.

    (3)   That:

                 (a)   participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority groups or independent senators; and

                 (b)   participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee.

    (4)   That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

    (5)   That the committee elect as chair a member nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens, and elect as deputy chair a member nominated by the Leader of the Opposition.

    (6)   That the deputy chair shall act as chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

    (7)   That, in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, has the casting vote.

    (8)   That 3 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.

    (9)   That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to examine.

  (10)   That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings, the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

  (11)   That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.

  (12)   That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public. ( general business notice of motion no. 1085 )

Senator Siewert: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   compulsory income management failed to meet policy objectives as assessed by the final evaluation of the Northern Territory Intervention,

                 (ii)   the cashless welfare card is a harsher form of income management, and

                (iii)   the evidence suggests that the cashless welfare card will not help people struggling with substance abuse, and may hurt many people on income support; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to:

                  (i)   abandon income management,

                 (ii)   halt the unnecessary cashless welfare card trial in Ceduna, and

                (iii)   adopt evidence-based policy that will genuinely support individuals and communities struggling with substance abuse. ( general business notice of motion no. 1086 )

Senators Carr, Xenophon, Madigan and Wang: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee for inquiry and report by 25 August 2016:

The state of Australia’s rail industry and how government procurement, including through the Australia Rail Track Corporation, and other policy levers can improve the value for money, competitiveness, stability of work and capability of the rail manufacturing industry, with specific reference to:

    (a)   the importance of the national rail industry as a regional employer and activity generator, and the potential costs of further decline of rail manufacturing on the national and relevant regional economies;

    (b)   the state of the rail industry, barriers to growth and improved productivity, and the potential of Australia’s rail industry as a skills and technology incubator, supplier of domestic rail needs as well as potential exports;

     (c)   the potential for Australia to benefit from a nationally-coordinated approach to rail manufacturing standards and rail procurement projects given the size of the Australian rail industry; and

    (d)   any other related matters.

Senator Back: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate recognises that:

    (a)   14 March marks Commonwealth Day for 2.2 billion people living in 53 countries;

    (b)   in the words of the new Commonwealth Secretary-General Designate, The Right Honourable Baroness Patricia Scotland, the eradication of polio is ‘an exemplary example of what the Commonwealth can do when it collaborates and works together with focus to bring something about’;

     (c)   in 1987, when Commonwealth leaders met in Vancouver, more than 350 000 cases of polio paralysed and killed children in 125 countries annually, and in the following year, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) was formed, bringing together Rotary International, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) united in a common cause: to eradicate polio once and for all;

    (d)   today polio remains endemic in just one Commonwealth country - Pakistan - following the removal of both India and Nigeria from the list of polio endemic countries in recent years, and even in Pakistan progress has been significant, with 80 per cent fewer cases being recorded in 2015 compared to 2014;

     (e)   a funding gap of $1.5 billion for implementing the GPEI’s current strategic plan threatens to derail this progress;

     (f)   at the most recent Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting held in Malta in November 2015, Commonwealth leaders, including Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, agreed to accelerate action and renew financial support to eradicate polio once and for all;

     (g)   the Australian Government has committed up to $72 million to polio eradication over 5 years, of which up to $36 million is committed to the GPEI from 2015 to 2018;

    (h)   Australia has contributed a total of US$67.35 million to the GPEI from 1985 to 2014, ranking the third highest Commonwealth donor, behind the United Kingdom and Canada;

      (i)   strong routine immunisation systems and national health systems are critical to prevent polio resurgence and other communicable disease outbreaks;

     (j)   in addition, Australia’s core contributions of $12.4 million to the WHO for 2015-16, $21 million to UNICEF, and $250 million pledged to GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance for 2016-2020, also support routine immunisation, including polio;

    (k)   living up to the 2016 Commonwealth Day theme ‘An Inclusive Commonwealth’, the full eradication of polio could be the first milestone success of the new Sustainable Development Goals, providing the blueprint for reaching children with life-saving interventions in some of the most remote, vulnerable and socially-excluded communities; and

      (l)   investment in polio eradication will yield the ultimate return - future generations of children will be free of this devastating disease while the health of the world will long benefit from the program’s knowledge and experience, as was demonstrated in 2014 when the use of polio infrastructure enabled Nigeria to stop the spread of Ebola. ( general business notice of motion no. 1087 )

Senators Muir, Day and Wang, the Leader of the Glenn Lazarus Team (Senator Lazarus) and Senators Lambie and Leyonhjelm: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes:

                  (i)   that the building and construction industry is a significant driver of economic activity in Australia, producing around 8 per cent of Australia’s gross domestic product,

                 (ii)   that the building and construction industry comprises over 330 000 businesses nationwide, and directly employs over one million people, which is around 9 per cent of the total workforce,

                (iii)   comments by the Treasurer (Mr Morrison) in The Australian on 1 February 2016 where he stated that re-establishing the Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC) was an important economic reform that must be passed by this Parliament,

                (iv)   that the Prime Minister (Mr Turnbull) has stated that re-establishing the ABCC was absolutely vital, and

                 (v)   that it has had an opportunity to debate legislation to reinstate the ABCC but has declined to do so; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to amend the resolution agreed to on 15 March 2016 relating to the hours of meeting and routine of business for the week beginning 13 March 2016 by adding to the list of bills in paragraph (4) the “Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and Building and Construction Industry (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2013 [No. 2]”. ( general business notice of motion no. 1088 )

Senator Carr: To move on the next day of sitting—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, no later than 9.30 am on Thursday, 17 March 2016:

    (a)   all documents that were ordered to be laid on the table by the Senate on 29 February 2016 relating to the restructuring of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division;

    (b)   any briefing or correspondence from the CSIRO to the Minister or the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science relating to the order for the production of documents agreed by the Senate on 24 February 2016 relating to the restructuring of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division;

     (c)   any briefing or correspondence from the CSIRO to the Minister or the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science relating to the orders for the production of documents agreed by the Senate on 29 February 2016 relating to the restructuring of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division; and

    (d)   any documents held by the CSIRO relating to the orders for the production of documents agreed by the Senate on 24 and 29 February 2016 relating to the restructuring of the CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere division. ( general business notice of motion no. 1089 )

Senator Collins: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   rejects the public interest immunity claim made by the Minister for Finance and Special Minister of State, Senator Cormann, on Thursday, 3 March 2016, asserting that the disclosure of communications between ministers, ministerial staff, departmental officers and the Australian Electoral Commission relating to changes to voting laws on the grounds ‘that this would disclose information that formed part of the deliberations of Cabinet’ and that ‘disclosure of this material would be contrary to the public interest’;

    (b)   further rejects the decision of the Minister to claim public interest immunity on redacted portions of other documents ‘on the grounds that some relate to Cabinet deliberations; to the commercial interests of the Commonwealth which would be harmed in the event of disclosure; and to the private information of Commonwealth officers (including junior officer information)’; and

     (c)   orders that there be laid on the table by the Special Minister of State, no later than noon on Thursday, 17 March 2016, all documents recording communications with the Australian Electoral Commission by:

                  (i)   the Minister for Finance,

                 (ii)   the Acting Special Minister of State,

                (iii)   the Special Minister of State, and

                (iv)   the Department of Finance,

             relating to proposed changes to the Senate voting system, including the Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016, since 1 September 2015. ( general business notice of motion no. 1090 )