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8       Notices

Senator Whish-Wilson: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Economics References Committee for inquiry and report by 22 June 2016:

Carbon risk disclosure in regard to:

    (a)   current and emerging international carbon risk disclosure frameworks;

    (b)   current carbon risk disclosure practices within corporate Australia;

     (c)   Australian involvement in the G20 Financial Stability Board discussions on carbon risk impacts for financial stability;

    (d)   current regulatory and policy oversight of carbon risk disclosure across government agencies; and

     (e)   any other related matters.

Senators Williams and Sterle: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   the trucking industry consists of approximately 49 000 businesses of which 25 000 are owner-drivers,

                 (ii)   road freight transport delivers more than 2 billion tonnes of goods per year, which is 71 per cent of Australia’s domestic freight,

                (iii)   the industry has had a poor but improving safety record, particularly considering the growth in the number of trucks on the road, and in the 12 months to the end of September 2015 there were 102 deaths in crashes involving articulated trucks and 82 deaths in crashes involving rigid trucks,

                (iv)   some large companies have been unfairly asking trucking operators to accept extended payment terms of up to 120 days which is not in the spirit of a harmonious business relationship,

                 (v)   the resultant impact on a trucking operator’s cash flow may affect their ability to meet their own financial commitments, such as for wages, lease payments and maintenance of their vehicles, and

                (vi)   any reduction in maintenance and repair schedules forced on operators by extended payment terms could lead to more serious accidents and fatalities; and

    (b)   calls on businesses to adopt payment terms not exceeding 30 days, consistent with the requirements of the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal, and in line with the Australian Government policy of making payments no later than 30 days for many contracts. ( general business notice of motion no. 988 )

Senators Lines, Urquhart and Brown: To move on the next day of sitting—That, on International Day of People with Disability, the Senate calls on state, territory and Commonwealth governments to demonstrate their commitment to people with disability by signing the remaining bilateral agreements for the full rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Australia-wide. ( general business notice of motion no. 989 )

Senator Ludlam: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes:

                  (i)   the findings of the Economics References Committee in its report Out of reach? The Australian housing affordability challenge (received 8 May 2015) containing 40 recommendations, and

                 (ii)   that the Government supported nine of these recommendations, including:

                  ( a )   to commit to ensuring adequate funding so that women and children escaping domestic violence are housed in secure and appropriate housing,

                  ( b )   investigating housing supply bonds and tax increment financing to fund infrastructure for new housing developments, and

                  ( c )   to look closely at its aged care policy in relation to the difficulties confronting older Australians in the rental market; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to update the Senate on Thursday, 3 December 2015, on any progress, if at all, on implementing those nine recommendations. ( general business notice of motion no. 990 )

Senator Smith: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes:

                  (i)   the large scale adoption of ‘Round Up Ready’ canola by Western Australian farmers following its introduction by the Western Australian Liberal-National State Government in 2009-10,

                 (ii)   the comments regarding the commercial cultivation of genetically-modified (GM) canola in Western Australia, New South Wales and Victoria made to the ABC’s Landline program on 25 July 2010 by the then Labor Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Mr Burke, - ‘My view is that the time for banning GM is long since passed. We need to have appropriate regulation to make sure that crops that are planted meet all the food safety guidelines. That’s important. But I just don’t think there is an argument anymore that says you can turn a blind eye to an area of technology that’s going to play a particular role in the future in reducing chemical use, reducing pesticide use and helping feed people’, and

                (iii)   the comments made to Farm Weekly on 12 March 2013 over developing a national strategy on the consistent application of modern biotechnology in agriculture by then Labor Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Senator Ludwig, that ‘We do support the use of GM within the federal OGTR framework, requirements, and I’d encourage everyone to look at that research and the work that’s being done’;

    (b)   supports the recommendations of both the 2006 statutory review of the Gene Technology Act 2000 , and the 2011 Review of the Gene Technology Act 2000 [report to the Department of Health and Ageing by the Allen Consulting Group], which noted that GM crops posed no adverse impact on markets, and concluded that state bans were having detrimental, rather than beneficial impacts;

     (c)   notes the announcement by agricultural biotechnology company Monsanto that it plans to become carbon neutral by 2021 through a program targeted across its seed and crop protection operations, and through collaboration with farmers; and

    (d)   condemns:

                  (i)   the Western Australian State Labor Party’s plan to reimpose a ban on cultivating GM crops if elected in March 2017, and

                 (ii)   the Australian Greens anti-GM policy to ban the cultivation of GM crops, which will deny grain producers in Western Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland the choice to use an internationally-accepted, safe, and proven cropping system. ( general business notice of motion no. 991 )

Senators Day and Leyonhjelm: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate calls on the Government to engage the Productivity Commission to review the Australian domestic shipping industry, to report on:

    (a)   the impediments to productivity in the sector;

    (b)   any consequential impacts on the productivity of the Australian agricultural, resources or other sectors arising from those impediments; and

     (c)   whether aspects of the European ‘Motorways of the Sea’ system could deliver productivity benefits to the Australian economy and domestic shipping. ( general business notice of motion no. 992 )

Senators Carr, Muir, Madigan, Xenophon and Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Finance and Public Administration References Committee for inquiry and report by 23 June 2016:

    (a)   progress made by the Government to address the recommendations in relation to paper procurement in the Finance and Public Administration References Committee’s report, Commonwealth procurement procedures (tabled 17 July 2014);

    (b)   the impact of procurement connected policies, with particular reference to the ICT Sustainability Plan and the National Waste Policy, on securing manufacturing investment and jobs in the paper sector; and

     (c)   any other related matters.

Senator Moore: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes:

                  (i)   the success of Tambo Teddies as the inaugural winner of Google and the Regional Australia Institute’s ‘Online Heroes’ competition,

                 (ii)   Tambo Teddies have been making bears and wool products since 1993 in the regional community of Tambo, and in 2015 celebrated bear number 40 000, and

                (iii)   that this company developed from a government Future Search Workshop, a program to create jobs in country towns, in 1992, whilst Western Queensland was suffering a crippling drought and devastating wool prices,

                (iv)   that the original bears were established by three women, Ms Mary Sutherland, Ms Helen Sargood and Ms Charm Ryrie, and that the business is now a major national and international company; and

    (b)   acknowledges the enterprise and inspiration of this local business. ( general business notice of motion no. 993 )

The Chair of the Environment and Communications References Committee (Senator Urquhart): To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by 22 June 2016:

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of the bumblebee population in Tasmania for commercial pollination purposes, including:

    (a)   the existing distribution and population density of exotic bumblebees;

    (b)   productivity and economic benefits of the commercial use of bumblebees for agricultural producers;

     (c)   the potential environmental impacts associated with the commercial use of bumblebees, including whether their use is likely to:

                  (i)   impact the conservation status of a species or ecological community,

                 (ii)   impact biodiversity,

                (iii)   cause unintended ecological impacts, and

                (iv)   contribute to a wider distribution of bumblebees;

    (d)   the implications for Australia’s biosecurity regime of any approval to use bumblebees in Tasmania for commercial purposes;

     (e)   the potential economic outcomes;

     (f)   the effectiveness of alternative pollination options; and

     (g)   any other related matters.

Senators Madigan, Day, Muir, Wang, Lazarus, Leyonhjelm and Lambie: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes the 2003 committee report by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs, Every picture tells a story: Report on the inquiry into child custody arrangements in the event of family separation , which recommended that a new non-adversarial system be created; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to:

                  (i)   recognise that thousands of Australian children continue to be harmed by a family law system that is not fit-for-purpose,

                 (ii)   recognise that the Family Law Act 1975 should be revised, simplified, shortened and based on core principles of the paramountcy of the long-term welfare of children, gender equality, and equal parental care and responsibility, when neither parent has been proven unfit, and

                (iii)   undertake a root-and-branch review of the family law system with a view to creating a new mechanism that is not adversarial in nature and deals with family separation in a way that has a tangible and primary focus on the welfare of the child, including an urgency for decisions, education and fairness. ( general business notice of motion no. 994 )

Senators Siewert, Moore and Lindgren: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   3 December is International Day of People with Disability,

                 (ii)   the theme for 2015 is ‘Inclusion matters: access and empowerment for people of all abilities’, and

                (iii)   the three sub-themes are:

                  ( a )   making cities inclusive and accessible for all,

                  ( b )   improving disability data and statistics, and

                  ( c )   including persons with invisible disabilities in society and development;

    (b)   acknowledges that International Day of People with Disability is an opportunity for the community to make positive changes to the lives of 4 million Australians;

     (c)   urges government at all levels to take action to develop inclusive and accessible communities; and

    (d)   encourages all Australians to get involved in the celebrations in their local community by visiting www.idpwd.com.au. ( general business notice of motion no. 995 )

The Minister for Communications (Senator Fifield): To move on the next day of sitting—That—

    (a)   so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the succeeding provisions of this resolution having effect;

    (b)   on Thursday, 3 December 2015, the business of the Senate notice of motion proposing the disallowance of the Child Care Benefit (Children in respect of whom no-one is eligible) Determination 2015, standing in the name of Senator Hanson-Young, be called on no later than 3.45 pm; and

     (c)   if consideration of the motion listed in paragraph (b) is not concluded at 4 pm, the questions on the unresolved motion shall then be put.

Senator Lambie: To move on the next day of sitting—That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Defence (Senator Payne), no later than 3.30 pm on Tuesday, 2 February 2016, a copy of the Defence White Paper 2015. ( general business notice of motion no. 996 )

Senator Lambie: To move on the next day of sitting—That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Defence (Senator Payne), no later than 3.30 pm on Tuesday, 2 February 2016, a copy of the Lazard Scoping Study completed on the future ownership and operations for Defence Housing Australia. ( general business notice of motion no. 997 )

Senator Moore: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate notes that despite the change of Prime Minister, the Turnbull Government has adopted former Prime Minister Abbott’s misplaced priorities and broken promises. ( general business notice of motion no. 998 )

Senators Simms and Xenophon: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by 3 March 2016:

The potential environmental, social and economic impacts of British Petroleum’s planned exploratory oil drilling project, and any future oil or gas production in the Great Australian Bight, with particular reference to:

    (a)   the effect of a potential drilling accident on marine and coastal ecosystems, including:

                  (i)   impacts on existing marine reserves within the Bight,

                 (ii)   impacts on whale and other cetacean populations, and

                (iii)   impacts on the marine environment,

    (b)   social and economic impacts, including effects on tourism, commercial fishing activities and other regional industries;

     (c)   current research and scientific knowledge;

    (d)   the capacity, or lack thereof, of government or private interests to mitigate the effect of an oil spill; and

     (e)   any other related matters. 

Senator Xenophon: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by 23 June 2016:

The adequacy of security for government and citizen data held, or transmitted, by governments, commercial entities, non-government organisations (NGOs) or citizens, with a particular focus on:

    (a)   Australia’s current laws and their enforcement;

    (b)   the Government’s cyber security policy framework for government agencies, and reporting requirements of same;

     (c)   security, such as vetting, measures for personnel with access to government and citizen data stored, or transmitted, on government, NGO and commercial entities’ information technology (IT) systems;

    (d)   physical security measures for government, NGO and commercial entities’ IT systems which store or transmit government and citizen data, including for mobile phone networks;

     (e)   cyber-attack and interception security measures for government, NGO and commercial entities’ IT systems which store, or transmit, government and citizen data, including for mobile phone networks (for example, SS7 vulnerabilities and International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) catchers);

     (f)   the safe disposal of obsolete government, NGO and commercial entities’ IT systems, databases and storage systems;

     (g)   methods for detecting security breaches, including the detection of mobile surveillance devices such as IMSI catchers;

    (h)   other approaches to these areas used in other jurisdictions; and

      (i)   any other related matters.

Senator Xenophon: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Community Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 4 February 2016:

The medical complaints process in Australia, with particular reference to:

    (a)   the prevalence of bullying and harassment in Australia’s medical profession;

    (b)   any barriers, whether real or perceived, to medical practitioners reporting bullying and harassment;

     (c)   the roles of the Medical Board of Australia, the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency and other relevant organisations in managing investigations into the professional conduct (including allegations of bullying and harassment), performance or health of a registered medical practitioner or student;

    (d)   the operation of the Health Practitioners Regulation National Law Act 2009 (the National Law), particularly as it relates to the complaints handling process;

     (e)   whether the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme, established under the National Law, results in better health outcomes for patients, and supports a world-class standard of medical care in Australia;

     (f)   the benefits of ‘benchmarking’ complaints about complication rates of particular medical practitioners against complication rates for the same procedure against other similarly qualified and experienced medical practitioners when assessing complaints;

     (g)   the desirability of requiring complainants to sign a declaration that their complaint is being made in good faith; and

    (h)   any related matters.

Senator Smith: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   congratulates the Right Honourable Patricia Scotland on her selection at the 2015 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) as the 6th Commonwealth Secretary-General; and

    (b)   notes the 2015 CHOGM Communique which states that:

                  (i)   the Commonwealth Heads of Government reaffirmed their shared and enduring commitment on behalf of the people of the Commonwealth to the values and principles of the Commonwealth Charter,

                 (ii)   young people, who comprise sixty percent of the Commonwealth's population, have an important role in building stable, secure and prosperous societies, and that Commonwealth programs can help raise awareness of the risk of radicalisation and prevent young people from embracing violent extremism, radicalisation and terrorism in all its forms,

                (iii)   the Commonwealth recognises that freedom of opinion and expression, freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and freedom of religion and belief are cornerstones of democratic societies, and important for the enjoyment of all human rights, and

                (iv)   good governance and respect for the rule of law are vital for stable and prosperous societies. ( general business notice of motion no. 999 )

Senator Ludlam: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

    (a)   notes that:

                  (i)   the Senate had begun debate on mandatory data breach notification legislation prior to the 2013 election,

                 (ii)   the Attorney-General (Senator Brandis) committed to introduce data breach notification laws before the end of 2015 during the debate over the national data retention scheme,

                (iii)   the Attorney-General again committed to introduce such laws to the Parliament before the end of 2015 in an answer to a question without notice on 13 October 2015, and

                (iv)   contrary to these commitments, the bill has not been introduced; and

    (b)   calls on the Government to make a statement to the Senate on 3 December 2015 explaining why such legislation has not been introduced, and clarifying the Government’s intentions. ( general business notice of motion no. 1000 )

Notice of motion withdrawn : Senator Siewert withdrew general business notice of motion no. 929 standing in her name for today, relating to the New South Wales Custody Notification Service.

Senator Siewert, by leave, made a statement relating to the matter.