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Tuesday, 15 October 2002
Page: 5128

Senator Heffernan to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee be authorised to hold a public meeting during the sitting of the Senate on Thursday, 17 October 2002, from 4 pm, to take evidence for the committee's inquiry into the provisions of the Egg Industry Service Provision Bill 2002 and a related bill.

Senator George Campbell to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Employment, Workplace Relations and Education References Committee be authorised to hold a public meeting during the sitting of the Senate on Thursday, 17 October 2002, from 11.30 am to 12.30 pm, to take evidence for the committee's inquiry into small business employment.

Senator Brandis to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Economics Legislation Committee be authorised to hold a public meeting during the sitting of the Senate on Thursday, 17 October 2002, from 4.30 pm, to take evidence for the committee's inquiry into the provisions of the Excise Tariff Amendment Bill (No. 1) 2002 and a related bill.

Senator Stott Despoja to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the recently-released Dusseldorp Skills Forum report, entitled `How young people are faring—key indicators 2002: An update about the learning and work situation of young Australians', found that there has been an increase in the number of teenagers not in `full time education or full time employment' in May 2002 compared to May 2001,

(ii) the report also found that 25 per cent of young adult women and 19 per cent of young adult men were at `considerable labour market risk' in May 2002,

(iii) the Finn targets for post-compulsory education and training attainment by 19 and 22-year olds, agreed to unanimously by Commonwealth and state governments in 1991, have not been reached,

(iv) in 2001, the level of unemployment for Australians aged 15 to 24 was 2.4 times that of 25- to 54-year olds, and

(v) the report notes that long-term disadvantages flow from a troubled transition process between school and further education, training or employment; and

(b) urges the Government to develop a more effective transition system for young people between leaving school and going on to further education, training or employment, and that this transition system pay particular attention to early school leavers.

Senator Ridgeway to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the international community has quickly embraced the Mine Ban Treaty which entered into force on 1 March 1999, with three-quarters of the world's nations already States Parties and signatories, and therefore legally bound to destroy their stockpiles of mines, eliminate mines in the ground, and cease production and use of mines,

(ii) although there has been a marked decrease in the number of governments and rebel groups using antipersonnel mines since the treaty entered into force, nine governments have engaged in significant new mine-laying operations in the past year,

(iii) the number of new mine casualties is estimated by Landmine Monitor to be some 15 to 20 thousand each year, taking an appalling toll on children, farmers and other innocent people, and

(iv) while on a global scale mine clearance and other mine action programs have expanded greatly over the past decade, a number of these programs are in financial crisis and will not meet the 10-year treaty deadline for completion of clearance;

(b) congratulates Sister Patricia Pak Poy of the Adelaide Sisters of Mercy on her receipt of the 2002 Australian Council for Overseas Aid Human Rights Award in recognition of her tireless and committed work over the past decade with the Australian Network of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines to rid the world of the scourge of landmines; and

(c) pays tribute to Sister Pak Poy as:

(i) the driver of the national grassroots campaign that led to Australia's ratification of the Mine Ban Treaty and subsequent domestic anti-mine legislation, and

(ii) a role model to the many people who were inspired by her quiet deter-mination to enhance the achievement of human rights internationally through peaceful, collective action.

Senator Allison to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Saturday, 28 September 2002, was World Retina Day,

(ii) macular degeneration is an incurable eye disease and is the leading cause of blindness for those aged 55 and older in Australia,

(iii) macular degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, causing progressive deterioration of sight from loss of central vision leading to total blindness,

(iv) every year, 10 000 Australians are diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration, and an estimated 20 000 Australians have macular degeneration that can be attributed to their smoking, and

(v) macular degeneration has already robbed nearly 350 000 Australians over the age of 50 of their eyesight, yet there is still very little understanding of or research into the disease; and

(b) calls on the Government to fund research into this condition, for which there is currently no known cure, and support the Macular Degeneration Foundation Australia's aims to bring dignity, support and education to Australians suffering from this disease.

Senator Ian Campbell to move on the next day of sitting:

That the following bills may be taken together for their remaining stages:

Prohibition of Human Cloning Bill 2002

Research Involving Embryos Bill 2002.

Senator Bartlett to move on Thursday, 17 October 2002:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the circumstances that drive people to attempt to travel from Indonesia to seek asylum in Australian are many and varied, and include long waiting periods in Indonesia for the resolution of claims for asylum and long delays in determining a durable solution for those found to be genuine refugees,

(ii) on 19 October 2001 a boat, now identified as `Suspect Illegal Entry Vessel X', carrying 421 passengers and crew including 70 children, sank with the tragic loss of 352 lives, and

(iii) a number of those who lost their lives had close family members in Australia who were undergoing refugee determination or who had been granted temporary protection visas;

(b) acknowledges the concerns raised by this tragedy within the Australian community and expresses its regret at the loss of life; and

(c) asks the Minister for Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs (Mr Ruddock) to grant those who have suffered such a loss, whether they are in detention awaiting a decision or are in the community on a temporary protection visa, a permanent visa on humanitarian grounds.

Senator IAN CAMPBELL (Western Australia—Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer) (3.00 p.m.)—I give notice that, on the next day of sitting, I shall move:

That the provisions of paragraphs (5) to (7) of standing order 111 not apply to the following bills, allowing them to be considered during this period of sittings:

Education Services for Overseas Students Amendment Bill 2002

Treasury Legislation Amendment Bill (No. 1) 2002.

I also table statements of reasons justifying the need for these bills to be considered during these sittings and seek leave to have the statements incorporated in Hansard.

Leave granted.

The statements read as follows

EDUCATION SERVICES FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS AMENDMENT BILL 2002

Purpose of the Bill

The amendments to the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 are of a minor and technical nature. They will clarify and strengthen the compliance and enforcement provisions in the Act.

The amendments support the government's objective of providing a strengthened regulatory framework for Australia's education and training export industry and will ensure its integrity and long-term viability.

Reasons for Urgency

The amendments to the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 will provide greater clarity about the Commonwealth's powers and greater certainty for the education and training export industry.

The amendments require passage in 2002 in order to ensure that they take effect from the beginning of the 2003 academic year.

—————

TREASURY LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (No. 1) 2002

Purpose of the Bill

The Bill will clarify the operation of the amendments made by the Financial Sector (Collection of Data—Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Act 2001 and the General Insurance Reform Act 2001 that commenced on 1 July 2002.

Reasons for Urgency

The Bill will remove an ambiguity in the operation of the Financial Sector (Collection of Data— Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Act 2001 (CoD) and the General Insurance Reform Act 2001 (GIRA) by legislating that the provisions of the CoD commenced immediately before the provisions of the GIRA.

As the provisions of the two Acts commenced on the same day, 1 July 2002, it is not clear which provisions are meant to have effect. Given that the subject matter relates to the prudential regulation of general insurance companies, a Bill needs to be introduced as a matter of urgency to clarify and remove the current ambiguity.

(Circulated by authority of the Minister for Revenue and Assistant Treasurer)

Senator Brown to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) recent evidence tendered by Professor Hiscock, of the Australian National University, which suggests that Aboriginal sites at Sandon Point may be amongst the most significant Aboriginal sites on the eastern seaboard,

(ii) that these sites have already been severely damaged by the commencement of work on a housing project designed and marketed by Stockland Trust Group, and

(iii) an elder of the Wadi Wadi Coomaditchie Aboriginal Corporation, Alan Carriage, has requested that an emergency declaration be made, under section 9 of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage (Interim Protection) Act 1984, to allow proper investigation of the importance of sites contained at Sandon Point; and

(b) requests the Minister for the Environment and Heritage (Dr Kemp) to grant this emergency declaration to allow a 30-day period to make a proper assessment of the important cultural and environmental heritage of this area.