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Thursday, 10 May 1984
Page: 1999

(Question No. 796)


Senator Missen asked the Minister representing the Minister for Home Affairs and Environment, upon notice, on 3 April 1984:

(1) Is the practice of culling kangaroos normally designed to achieve the removal of old or non-breeding animals from the kangaroo population.

(2) What evidence does the Government have that any genuine practice of culling is used by kangaroo shooters.

(3) Are professional kangaroo shooters making no attempt to cull less fit animals.

(4) Has the South Australian Government recently directed shooters to concentrate on female kangaroos and young animals.

(5) Has this policy also led to a drastic reduction of the number of larger, healthier breeding male kangaroos and to a doubling of the South Australian quota.


Senator Ryan —The Minister for Home Affairs and Environment has provided the following answer to the honourable senator's question:

(1) To the extent practicable, kangaroo shooters generally select larger animals to maximise returns. Culling is not necessarily the removal of old or non-breeding animals from the population; the Concise Oxford Dictionary defines culling as the selection and killing of surplus animals.

(2) See (1) above.

(3) See (1) above.

(4) The South Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that the answer is no.

(5) The South Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that the policy referred to does not exist. The South Australian quota for Red and Western Grey kangaroos and euros in 1984 is 143,000, reduced from 300,000 in 1983.