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Wednesday, 26 March 2014
Page: 3225

Economy


Mr BOWEN (McMahon) (15:10): I have a supplementary question to the Treasurer—

The SPEAKER: I beg your pardon, the member for Tangney.

Mr BOWEN: Madam Speaker, you called me. I was on my feet first.

The SPEAKER: Yes, I did.

Mr BOWEN: Thank you, Madam Speaker. I have a question for the Treasurer. I refer the Treasurer to the fact—

The SPEAKER: Will the member just pause for a moment.

Mr BOWEN: Certainly.

The SPEAKER: It is the same principle that applied before, and the member for McMahon was on his feet before the member for Tangney.

Mr BOWEN: Thank you very much, Madam Speaker. My question is to the Treasurer. I refer the Treasurer to the fact that budget deficits have doubled on his watch, adding $68 billion across the forward estimates. If the Treasurer believes we are in a budget emergency, why have you doubled the deficit?










Mr HOCKEY (North SydneyThe Treasurer) (15:11): Because it is your deficit—$123 billion of Labor deficit! And the numbers tell the truth.

Mr Burke: Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. The Treasurer should be directing his comments through the chair.

The SPEAKER: It is getting very close. I call the Treasurer.

Mr Burke: On the point of order, Madam Speaker, you just indicated that the point of order that I had raised was very close as though there was a problem with raising the most basic point of parliamentary behaviour, which is to refer to—

The SPEAKER: The member will resume his seat. He is not entitled to put argument.

Mr Burke: We have made points of order.

Mr Pyne: Stop bullying the Speaker! Don't you like having a woman in the chair, Tony?

The SPEAKER: The Treasurer has the call.

Mr HOCKEY: Let us be very, very clear: this is the last economic statement from the member—

Mr Bowen interjecting

The SPEAKER: The member for McMahon will remove himself under standing order 94(a), and resume some sensibility.

The member for McMahon then left the chamber.

Mr HOCKEY: That has just increased the IQ of the Labor Party.

Mr Swan: It's your number!

Mr HOCKEY: And if the member for Lilley goes out, that will double the IQ of the Labor Party. The bottom line is the Labor Party—

Mr Swan: It's your number!

The SPEAKER: The member for Lilley will desist. There will be silence on my left.

Mr HOCKEY: The Labor Party and the member for Lilley must be incredibly proud of the legacy. It was the member for Lilley that promised a surplus.

Mr Swan: It's your number!

Mr Pyne: Madam Speaker, on a point of order, the member for Lilley is red-faced and screaming across the chamber, and we cannot hear the Treasurer's attempts at answering the question. I would ask you to get the member for Isaacs and the member for Lilley under control.

Mr Fitzgibbon: On the point of order, why wouldn't members on this side be excited when the Treasurer has conceded the assertion—

The SPEAKER: The member for Hunter will resume his seat. There has obviously been a concerted effort of noise and an attempt to disrupt the proceedings of the House today, which is no doubt a precursor to the motion which the member for Watson is so anxious to move. I have been very careful to allow the member for Watson to remain in the chamber, because I would not want to deprive him of his opportunity. So we will have no more of the screaming and yelling. We will have quiet for the rest of question time. I notice that the questions from the opposition are listened to in silence and then the ruckus begins. So we will have some proper demeanour and some proper behaviour back in the chamber.

Mr HOCKEY: If economic performance is based on actually delivering a surplus, the Labor Party failed at every count. It was the member for Lilley that delivered a $27 billion deficit, then a $54 billion deficit, then a $47 billion deficit, then a $43 billion deficit—

Mr Dreyfus: Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. The question was about the $68 billion that this Treasurer has added to the deficit, and there needs to be relevance in the answer.

The SPEAKER: The member for Isaacs knows he must not abuse the standing orders. The question was wide ranging, and the answer is in order.

Mr HOCKEY: So he must be immensely proud of his record of $190 billion of deficits. You are a winner, old Swannie!

Mr Burke: Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I would ask the Treasurer to direct his remarks through the chair.

The SPEAKER: The Treasurer has the call and will kindly address his remarks through the chair.

Mr HOCKEY: What an incredibly proud moment it must have been for the member for Lilley to have overseen, as Treasurer, every single year in deficit and then to have left a legacy of $123 billion of deficit and $667 billion of deficit.

Mr Swan interjecting

The SPEAKER: The member for Lilley will desist.

Mr HOCKEY: How about throwing him out?

Mr Dreyfus interjecting

The SPEAKER: The member for Isaacs will leave the chamber, under the provisions of standing order 94(a).

The member for Isaacs then left the chamber.

Mr HOCKEY: The member for Lilley is a genius! He should have been the world's worst Treasurer, because that was the decision of the Australian people. There was one consistent theme across the whole Rudd-Gillard government. It was that Wayne Swan was the Treasurer. The member for Lilley was the Treasurer. He was unquestionably the worst Treasurer. He designed taxes that never raised any money, he kept chopping and changing policy and he left a legacy that we have to fix. Well, we are determined to fix the budget, we are determined to undertake the repair job, we are determined to grow the Australian economy and we are determined to help the Australian enterprises and businesses out there to create the jobs of the 21st century.

Mr Abbott: I ask that further questions be placed on the Notice Paper.