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    11   PERU AND AUSTRALIA

Mr L. D. T. Ferguson, pursuant to notice, moved—That this House:

(1)    recognises the accomplishments of 50 years of fruitful diplomatic relations between Peru and Australia, the continuing friendship between our nations and the contribution of Peruvian migrants in our nation building; and

(2)    notes:

(a)    the reopening of our Embassy in Lima in September 2010;

(b)   our:

(i)    shared democratic values in the context of a strong commitment to transparency, well-established policy credibility and good governance structure and quality of institutions; and

(ii)   mutual emphasis on multilateral involvement exemplified by Peru’s membership to the United Nations, World Trade Organisation (WTO), Organization of American States, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, Pacific Alliance and Forum for East Asia and Latin America Cooperation;

(c)    that the roles of Herbert Vere Evatt and former United Nations Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar point to our mutual activity;

(d)   our similar activity on the free trade front and common membership of the Cairns Group, WTO and APEC; and

(e)    the:

(i)    visits to Peru by former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam in 1975 and former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd in 2008, and the visit of former President Alan Garcia Perez to Australia in 2007;

(ii)   November 2011 framework to promote Bilateral Consultations and Cooperation;

(iii)  presence at the 2011 census of 8,441 Peruvian born citizens in Australia and attraction of Peru to Australian visitors totalling 30,000 in 2011; and

(iv)  longstanding Australian mining endeavours in Peru, the growth of Peruvian student numbers in Australia and 56 Australian companies having an office in Peru or investment in a Peruvian project.

Debate ensued.

Debate adjourned, and the resumption of the debate made an order of the day for the next sitting.