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BUSINESS OF THE MAIN COMMITTEE

Thursday, 7 July 2011

The Main Committee meets at 9.30 a.m.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

1   death of Sergeant todd langley—condolence motion: Resumption of debate—( from 5 July 2011—Mr Albanese ) on the motion of Ms Gillard.

2   Competition and Consumer legislation Amendment Bill 2011 ( Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from 15 June 2011—Mr K. J. Andrews ).

Committee and delegation reports

Orders of the day

1   Regional Australia—Standing Committee—report—Of drought and flooding rains: Inquiry into the impact of the Guide to the Murray-Darling Basin Plan—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Mr Melham ) on the motion of Mr Windsor—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS continued

Orders of the day continued

3   prime minister’s report 2011—CLOSING THE GAP—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 March 2011—Mr S. P. Jones ) on the motion of Mr Dreyfus—That the House take note of the document.

4   commemoration of the 2 nd anniversary of the black saturday bushfires—ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011—Mr C. R. Thomson ) on the motion of Mr Rudd—That the House take note of the document.

5   GRIEVANCE DEBATE: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ).

Committee and delegation reports continued

Orders of the day continued

2   Christmas Island Tragedy—Joint Select Committee—REPORT—christmas island tragedy of 15 december 2010—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Mr Melham ) on the motion of Mr Keenan—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

3   Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee—REPORT—inquiry into australia’s relationship with the countries of africa—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Mr S. P. Jones ) on the motion of Mr Fitzgibbon—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

4   Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee—REPORT—reclaiming public space: Inquiry into the regulation of billboard and outdoor advertising—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Ms Owens ) on the motion of Mr Perrett—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

5   Health and Ageing—Standing Committee—REPORT—Before it’s too late: report on early intervention programs aimed at preventing youth suicide—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Ms Owens ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

6   Law Enforcement—Parliamentary Joint Committee—REPORT ON the Inquiry into the adequacy of aviation and maritime security measures to combat serious and organised crime—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Ms Rishworth ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

7   Cyber-Safety—Joint Select Committee—High-Wire Act, Cyber-Safety and the Young—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011—Mr Hayes ) on the motion of Mr Hawke—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

8   Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs—Standing Committee—REPORT—doing time - time for doing: Indigenous youth in the criminal justice system—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 6 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Neumann—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

9   Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee—REPORT 423: Review of Auditor -General’s Reports Nos. 39 (2009-10) to 15 (2010-11)—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

10   Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee—Report 424: Eighth biannual hearing with the Commissioner of Taxation—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

11   Education and Employment—Standing Committee—REPORT ON the inquiry into School Libraries and Teacher Librarians in 21 st Century Australia—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 May 2011—Mr Danby ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

12   Economics—Standing Committee—second REPORT ON the Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia Annual Report 2010—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 May 2011—Ms Grierson ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

13   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT ON the Inquiry into Indigenous economic development in Queensland and advisory report on the Wild Rivers (Environmental Management) Bill 2010—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

14   Education and Employment—Standing Committee—advisory REPORT ON the social security legislation amendment (job seeker compliance) bill 2011—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

15   Treaties—Joint Standing Committee—REPORT 116: treaties tabled on 24 and 25 november 2010, 9 february and 1 march 2011 and treaties referred on 16 november 2010 (part 3)—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

16   Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee—REPORT 422: Review of the 2009-10 defence materiel organisation major projects report—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

17   Gambling Reform—Joint Select Committee—first REPORT ON the design and implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling machines—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 May 2011—Ms Rishworth ) on the motion of Mr Wilkie—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

18   Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee—Report 421: The role of the Auditor-General in scrutinising government advertising—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 3 March 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

19   Economics—Standing Committee—Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia Annual Report 2010 (first Report)—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

20   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT ON the Inquiry into the Income Tax Rates Amendment (Temporary Flood Reconstruction Levy) Bill 2011 and the Tax Laws Amendment (Temporary Flood Reconstruction Levy) Bill 2011—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

21   Education and Employment—Standing Committee—advisory report on the higher education legislation amendment (student services and amenities) bill 2010—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 November 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Orders of the day

1   International Year of the Forests: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Adams—That this House:

(1) recognize that forest and sustainable forest management can contribute significantly to sustainable development, poverty eradication and the achievement of internationally agreed devel opment goals, including the Millennium Development Goals;

(2) support concerted efforts to focus on raising awareness at all levels to strengthen the sustainable management, conservation and sustainable development of all types of forests for the benefit of current and future generations;

(3) call upon State Governments, relevant regional and international organisations, and major groups to support activities related to the Year, inter alia, through voluntary contributions, and to link their relevant activities to the Year. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

2   South Australia Remote Areas Energy Supplies Scheme: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey—That this House:

(1) expresses:

(a) its greatest concern at the SA Government's decision to slash support for its Remote Are as Energy Supplies scheme which subsidises off-grid generation for isolated communities; and

(b) great concern that the reduction in subsidy will lead to escalating power prices for businesses of up to 100 per cent, recognising users will pay as much as $0.60 per kilowatt hour; and

(2) names the affected communities as Coober Pedy, Andamooka, Yunta, Nundroo, Marla, Oodnadatta, Marree, Kingoonya, Glendambo, Parachilna, Blinman, Manna Hill and Cockburn;

(3) recognises that as Coober Pedy relies on a desalinated water supply, the reduction in subsidy will lead to the price of water rising to $5.70 a kilolitre;

(4) brings to the SA Government's notice that every other State and Territory in Australia which has off-grid generation systems for isolated communities supports a state-wide pricing policy;

(5) expresses support for the affected communities and recognises the public outrage expressed at a public meeting in Coober Pedy on Sunday 15 May 2011 attended by Senator Nick Xenophon, SA Legislative Council Member the Hon. John Darley and Rowan Ramsey MP; and

(6) condemns the SA Government for its actions and calls on it to immediately re-instate the subsidies and consider bringing SA into line with the rest of Australia in supporting state-wide pricing. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

3   Tobacco marketing: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That this House:

(1) notes the devastating impact of tobacco products on the lives of Australians, with smoking causing numerous life-threatening diseases including cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, stomach cancer, pancreatic can cer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, leukaemia and oral cancers, and that the majority of smokers regret the decision to ever start;

(2) acknowledges that there is significant evidence to suggest that creative design, branding and promotion of tobacco through its packaging:

(a) reduces the impact of graphic health warnings;

(b) increases the attractiveness and appeal of tobacco products for adolescents; and

(c) misleads consumers to believe that some tobacco products are less harmful than others;

(3) re cognises that this Government is already implementing a suite of reforms aimed at reducing smoking and its harmful effects; and

(4) supports the significant measures proposed by this Government including the measure to mandate plain packaging of tobacco products from 1 July 2012. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

4   Fraud under the Home Insulation Program: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Fletcher—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) many home owners have reported incidents of suspected fraudulent insulation claims under th e Government's Home Insulation Program to the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency;

(b) the Department has indicated to complainants that they may never be provided with advice about the outcome of investigations in each case; and

(c) the Minister for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency and his Department, have failed to provide information concerning the number of claims of fraud that have been made or of instances of fraud which have been detected;

(2) condemns the Government for failing to:

(a) provide specific information to home owners about the outcome of investigations into alleged fraud at their homes; and

(b) report to Parliament, and to Australian taxpayers who have funded the Home Insulation Program, the details on the number o f claims of fraud that have been made or of instances of fraud which have been detected; and

(3) calls on the Minister to:

(a) direct his Department to provide information to home owners on an ongoing basis concerning the progress of investigations into incidents of suspected fraud reported by those home owners;

(b) immediately authorise an additional 50 000 random home inspections from within allocated funds; and

(c) provide regular reports to the Australian public concerning investigations into fraud under the Home Insulation Program, that include the number of:

(i) claims of alleged fraud that have been received, identified in the Government-commissioned forensic audit, and investigated;

(ii) cases investigated that have been completed, and those th at resulted in prosecutions, along with the outcomes of each;

(iii) prosecutions that are in train; and

(iv) cases where steps have been taken to seek restitution from fraudulent claimants, and the outcomes of such cases. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

5   Human rights in Vietnam: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) notes with concern that on 30 May 2011 in the People's Court of Ben Tre, Vietnam, the following seven people were tried and convicted under Section 2 of Article 79 of the penal code, ‘A ttempting to overthrow the people's administration’:

(a) Ms Tran Thi Thuy (8 years imprisonment and 5 years probation);

(b) Mr Pham Van Thong (7 years and 5 years probation);

(c) Pastor Duong Kim Khai (6 years and 5 years probation);

(d) Mr Cao Van Tinh (5 years and 4 years probation);

(e) Mr Nguyen Tha nh Tam (2 years and 3 years probation);

(f) Mr Nguyen Chi Thanh (2 years and 3 years probation); and

(g) Ms Pham Ngoc Hoa (2 years and 3 years probation);

(2) further notes all seven were advocates for democratic reform, and had:

(a) participated in n on-violent protest;

(b) prepared and distributed material affirming Vietnamese sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly Islands;

(c) petitioned the State for redress on behalf of local landholders; and

(d) as members of the ‘Cattle Shed Congregation’ of the Mennonite Church, engaged in peaceful advocacy for social justice; and

(3) expresses its concern that the authorities of Vietnam appear to be using legal processes to rationalise human rights abuse and to silence peaceful opposition; and

(4) calls o n the Government to use the full weight of its diplomatic relations with Vietnam to lobby for substantial reform in human rights and basic freedoms in accordance with the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which both Australia and Vietnam are parties. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

6   Centenary of the Royal Australian Navy: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander—That this House:

(1) recognises the:

(a) unique contribution made by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) to national defence since its inception 100 years ago; and

(b)  naming of the Royal Australian Navy by King George V on 10 July 1911 as a significant step towards Australia’s post-Federation independence from colonial rule; and

(2)  notes the significant role played by the electorate of Bennelong in the development of the RAN, particularly the construction of Halverson’s ships in Ryde. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

7   Electromagnetic exposure via mobile phones: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Ms O'Neill—That this House:

(1) the release by th e World Health Organisation’s cancer research report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which says that radio frequency electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones are ‘possibly carcinogenic to humans’ and asserts that heavy usage could lead to a possible increased risk of glioma, a malignant type of brain cancer;

(2) the warnings of Dr Charlie Teo, one of Australia’s leading brain surgeons and former Australian of the Year finalist, that ‘there is an increasing body of evidence that there is an association between brain tumours and mobile phones’;

(3) that the Australian Government, through the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), welcomes the report and considers that the classification by IARC corresponds to the current ARPANSA advice, including its advice on practical ways in which people can reduce their exposure to the electromagnetic fields produced by wireless telephones;

(4) that the methods to reduce exposure include:

(a) limiting cal l time;

(b) preferring the use of land-line phones;

(c) using hands-free or speaker options;

(d) texting instead of making voice calls; and

(e) using phones in good signal areas which reduce power levels for communication; and

(5) that ARPANSA has als o recommended parents encourage their children to use these methods of reducing exposure. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

8   wild dogs: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Chester—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) the social and economic impact of wild dogs on the sheep, cattle and goat industry across Australia;

(b) the environmental impact of wild dogs preying on Australia native wildlife; and

(c) that according to the Australian Pest Animals St rategy, pest animal management requires coordination among all levels of government in partnership with industry, land and water managers and the community; and

(2) highlights the need for a nationally consistent approach to effective wild dog control and ongoing Commonwealth funding to support research and on the ground work to reduce the impact of wild dogs on regional Australians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

9   Organ donation in Australia: Resumption of debate ( from 4 July 2011—Mr E. T. Jones , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Brodtmann—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Australia had a record year in 2010 with 309 multiple organ donors;

(b)  activity in 2011 shows that Australia is on track to steadily sustain this improvement with 112 donors already this year;

(c) following the injection of $151 million by the Government to establish a coordinated approach to organ donation, 242 staff have now been appointed in 77 hospitals and DonateLife agencies across Australia, thus enabling all jurisdictions to work cooperatively to support sustained improvements in organ donation;

(d) there were 931 transplants in 2010 and already there have been 327 transplants in 2011; and

(e) States and Territories are committed to supporting this reform agenda; and

(2) acknowledges:

(a) the selfless act of all donor families who have supported new life for transplant recipients;

(b) the introduction of a national protocol for donation after cardiac death that will ensure Australia maximises the number of organ donors;

(c) that many hospitals that have not previously donated organs and tissue are now undertaking this important role as a result of the extra funding and staffing that are available;

(d) that the States and Territories reaffirmed their commitment to the reform agenda in February 2011, in particular the financing of increases in tissue typing, retrieval of organs and transplant surgery;

(e) the success of the two advertising campaigns launched in May 2010 and February 2011; and

(f) the importance of continued input of community groups and non government organisations in raising awareness among the Australian community. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

10   live cattle exports: Resumption of debate ( from 20 June 2011—Ms Hall , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Cobb—That this House:

(1) deplores the inhumane treatment of cattle at some aba ttoirs in Indonesia;

(2) notes that this is unacceptable to all Australians, especially our farmers, who take great pride in breeding and raising healthy and well cared for animals;

(3) supports the suspension of trade of Australian live cattle to facilities that fail to comply with acceptable practices;

(4) notes with concern the impact of a total live exports suspension to Indonesia on:

(a) the economic, social and environmental fabric of northern Australia;

(b) Indigenous employment in northern Aust ralia;

(c) Indonesian abattoirs already operating at acceptable standards; and

(d) the entire cattle Industry including producers in the south who are already seeing reduced saleyard prices; and

(5) calls on the Government to:

(a) immediately establish a register of Indonesian abattoirs, to be known as the Approved Indonesian Abattoir Register, that have adopted and implemented acceptable animal welfare standards;

(b) require that Australian sourced cattle be processed only at abattoirs that are listed on the register;

(c) revoke the legislative instrument Export Control (Export of Live-stock to the Republic of Indonesia) Order 2011 upon one or more Indonesian abattoirs being included on the register;

(d) provide support to Indonesia to bring more abattoirs up to acceptable standards; and

(e) provide assistance to the cattle industry to deal with the consequences of this suspension. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. On Wednesday 22 June 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

11   world refugee day: Resumption of debate ( from 20 June 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that 20 June each year is World Refugee Day, celebrating the courageous spirit and resilience of more than 10 million refugees around the world;

(b) that the global theme for World Refugee Day 2011, occurring in the year of the sixtieth anniversary of the United Nations Refugee Convention, is ‘1 refugee without hope is too many.’;

(c) Australia’s history of support for the United Nations Refugee Convention and its objectives, being the sixth signatory to the 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention which brought the convention into force in 1954, and having since welcomed 750 000 refugees who have made an enormous contribution to the culture, economy and social fabric of Australian society;

(d) that much of the political, media and public commentary in Australia regarding asylum-seekers and refugees misses or ignores the following facts:

(i) of the more than 10 million refugees identified by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), just over 100 000 or 1 per cent are resettled under orderly programs each year, which means that if someone puts their name on a list today they could wait more than 100 years for processing;

(ii) in many countries wracked by conflict, like Iraq or Afghanistan, there is no list or queue to join;

(iii) Australia’s 8250 asylum seekers in 2010 is a minimal number compared with the 358 000 people who sought asylum in the 44 major industrialised counties in 2010, and compared with the millions of people from Iraq and Afghanistan who have sought refuge in neighbouring countries like Jordan, Iran and Pakistan.

(iv) only two per cent of the world’s asylum claims are made in Australia;

(v) persons fleeing from persecution are not ‘illegals’, they have a legal right under international law to seek asylum, and under the Menzies Government, Australia agreed to this by signing up to the United Nations Refugee Convention; and

(vi) while Essential Research has reported that 25 per cent of Australians believe that 75 per cent of our migrant intake is made up of asylum-seekers, in fact only 1 per cent of Australia’s annual migrant intake comes from them and even less from asylum-seekers who arrive by boat;

(2) n otes the UNHCR report of April 2011 entitled Back to Basics: The Right to Liberty and Security of Person and ‘Alternatives to Detention’ of Refugees, Asylum-Seekers, Stateless Persons and Other Migrants and welcomes the forthcoming parliamentary inquiry into mandatory detention;

(3) recognises that it is possible to protect Australia’s borders while also treating asylum-seekers fairly, humanely and in accordance with international law; and

(4) calls for:

(a) a return to bipartisanship in support of a reasoned, principled and facts-based approach to the issue of asylum-seekers and refugees; and

(b) Australia to continue to work with other nations and the United Nations to address the complex global and regional challenges associated with increased numbers of asylum-seekers and other people movements that cannot be addressed by countries acting on their own. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

12   computers in schools: Resumption of debate ( from 20 June 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Pyne—That this House:

(1)  acknowledges the Government's failure to deliver on its promise to provide a computer for every secondary school student between years 9 to12 within the original budget commitment of $1 billion;

(2)  condemns the Government for promising to families that they would not have to pay for charges associated with using the laptop computers, and then for breaking that promise by authorising schools to charge fees and levies to parents to use the laptops; and

(3) calls on the Government to explain to families why it has broken its promise and why parents should be the ones to pay up to hundreds of dollars to make up the funding shortfall associated with the program, at a time when cost of living pressure s are increasing. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. On Wednesday 22 June 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

13   Death of Senior Constable Damian Leeding: Resumption of debate ( from 20 June 2011 ) on the motion of Mrs D'Ath—That this House:

(1) expresses:

(a) its condolences to:

(i) the family of Senior Constable Damian Leeding who was shot in the line of duty on Sunday evening, 29 May 2011; and

(ii) the colleagues of Senior Constable Leeding at Coomera CIB, Queensland Police Service; and

(b) our gratitu de to men and women who serve in our police forces across Australia for the burden placed upon them and the sacrifices they make to protect others; and

(2) a cknowledges:

(a) the risks associated with the work performed by our men and women in the police forces across Australia and the bravery that they display in the performance of their duty; and

(b) the husbands, wives and partners of serving police officers for their support of those who serve in our police forces. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

14   Religious minorities in Iraq: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) n otes that:

(a) for more than 2000 years religious groups such as Assyrians, Mandaeans, Chaldeans, Syriacs and other Aramaic speakers have called Iraq home;

(b) in 2003, Australia w as part of the ‘coalition of the willing’ that invaded Iraq in the belief that Iraq harboured weapons of mass destruction;

(c) since 2003 there have been horrendous acts of persecution against these religious minorities in Iraq, including murders, bombings and extortion; and

(d) the Catholic Church reports that one million Christians have fled Iraq since the 2003 invasion; and

(2) recognises that:

(a) thousands of people are sheltering in Syria, Egypt, Jordan and the northern regions of Iraq because th ey feel they cannot return to their homes for fear of death and persecution;

(b) due to our part in the ‘coalition of the willing’, Australia has a moral responsibility to deal compassionately with these displaced people; and

(c) it will be a damning critique on humanity and the Coalition forces, who have vowed to protect the people of Iraq, if religious groups with such a significant historical link to the region are forced out at the hands of terrorists. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

15   Marine conservation: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Australia's oceans are the most diverse on earth but less than one per cent of the South-West, North-West, North, Coral Sea and East marine regions are currently protected;

(b) the Austra lian coastal lifestyles and our coastal economies are dependent on the good health of our oceans;

(c) evidence from marine sanctuaries around the world, including in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States, has shown that fish populations and fish size dramatically increase inside sanctuaries and in the nearby fished areas;

(d) the marine and environmental science is clear, and in 2008, 900 scientists from the Australian Marine Scientists Association reached a consensus that the creation of networks of large marine sanctuaries will:

(i) protect ocean life, including threatened species and critical habitats;

(ii) recover the abundance of ocean life within and beyond sanctuary boundaries, fostering more and bigger fish;

(iii) increase the resilience of ocean life to climate change; a nd

(iv) underpin the future of commercial and recreational fisheries and the sustainability of coastal economies; and

(e) through international agreement under the Convention on Biological Diversity, Australia has committed to establishing networks of ma rine reserves in its oceans by the end of 2012;

(2) welcomes the fact that:

(a) during 2011 the Australian Government will be finalising marine bioregional marine plans for the South-West, North-West, North and East marine regions (including the Coral Se a) in keeping with the commitment to a national marine conservation scheme first agreed to at the Council of Australian Governments in 1998;

(b) each marine bioregional plan will include a proposed network of Commonwealth marine reserves that will include sanctuary zones; and

(c) 2011 is the year of delivery for the world-class protection of the world's richest marine environments; and

(3) calls upon the Australian Government to further consider:

(a) establishing networks of large marine sanctuaries in each of the marine regions currently under investigation in the marine bioregional planning process; and

(b) providing sufficient funding for the transition of commercial fishing activities displaced by the establishment of marine sanctuaries. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

16   World Multiple Sclerosis Day: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms A. E. Burke—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Thursday 26 May marks World Multiple Sclerosis Day; and

(b) around the world, World Multiple Sclerosis Day in 2011 is being given the theme of employment to acknowledge that staying at work is a key concern for people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis;

(2) recognises that:

(a) multiple sclerosis is most frequently diagnosed in people aged between 20 and 40 years, at a stage in life whe n these people are building their careers and their families;

(b) the Australian Multiple Sclerosis Longitudinal Study reported that 80 per cent of people with multiple sclerosis lose their employment within 10 years of diagnosis;

(c) like many chronic diseases, multiple sclerosis is costly, and enabling people with multiple sclerosis to stay in work not only builds their confidence and self-esteem but helps to meet the costs that come with managing a lifelong disease; and

(d) with the ageing of the population, people with chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis will increasingly feature in Australian workplaces, requiring enhanced management and support of these employees; and

(3) commits itself to:

(a) ensuring that the labour market and welfare s ystem continue to provide assistance to people with multiple sclerosis in supporting them to both obtain and retain employment; and

(b) encouraging employers to incorporate greater flexibility in workplaces to enable people with multiple sclerosis and their carers to fulfil their productive capacity. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

17   Conflict in the Philippines: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr L. D. T. Ferguson—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) t here has been a long running armed conflict in the Philippines;

(b) both the new President Benigno Aquino III and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines have expressed the desire to resume the peace negotiations between the two parties which began in 1992 and were suspended in 2005; and

(c) the Royal Norwegian Government is the third party facilitator of these peace negotiations and it is actively supporting the resumption of the peace negotiations; and

(2) welcomes the re-commencement of the formal peace negotiations between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines from February 15-21 this year; and

(3) encourages both parties in their effor ts to resolve the conflict, and expresses a sincere wish for their success. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

18   MySchool, MyHospitals and MyChild websites: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011—Mr Laming , in continuation ) on the motion of Dr Leigh—That this House:

(1) recognises:

(a)  Australians are keen to have better access to information about government performance;

(b) more transparent public services have been shown to perform at higher levels; and

(c) greater access to information helps Australians make the best choices; and

(2)  commends the Australian Government on the creation of the MySchool, MyHospitals and MyChild websites. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

19   fiftieth Anniversary of Amnesty International: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That this House:

(1) notes that 28 May 2011 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Amnesty International, a global movement of over three million supporters dedicated to defending and protecting human rights;

(2) recognises the important role Amnesty International continues to play in promoting and protecting hum an rights and shining a light on human rights abuses around the world;

(3) acknowledges the many achievements of Amnesty International, including its:

(a) integral role in the development, promotion and ultimate adoption of the United Nations Convention Against Torture in 1975, it being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1977 and the Sydney Peace Prize in 2006; and

(b) successful campaigning for the release of thousands of political prisoners around the world; and

(4) notes that from 1961 till the end of 2010 the organisation:

(a) conducted at least 3341 missions to research human rights abuses around the world; and

(b) produced and published an estimated 17 093 reports and public documents including the annual human rights report which is now produced in 25 languages; and

(c) issued over 31 000 urgent actions for individuals at risk. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

20   National Consumer Credit Action Plan: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou—That this House:

(1) acknowledges the Federal Government's National C onsumer Credit Action Plan, particularly phase one of the plan which came into effect on 1 January 2011 and provides for licensing of all credit providers, new responsible lending requirements and access to external dispute resolution for all consumers of consumer credit;

(2) notes that phase two of the National Consumer Credit Action Plan will be considered by the Government in 2011, which will include consideration of new rules to apply to small amount short term loans (often known as payday loans);

(3) calls on all Members of this House to consider and consult with relevant community organisations on the impact of small amount short term loans on vulnerable constituents, particularly the impact of very expensive interest, fees and charges which can be detrimental to household budgets and reduce the ability for people to manage their day-to-day finances; and

(4) calls on the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation to improve the operation of the consumer credit market in Australia by ensuring that small amount short term loans are not damaging to families and households, by replacing the myriad of existing state-based interest rate limits with a single, national limit on the fees and interest that can be charged by short term lenders. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

21   tax summit: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hockey—That this House:

(1) notes the Government's decision to delay the Tax Sum mit from June to October 2011;

(2) considers that any genuine Tax Summit will properly review and report on Labor's proposals to introduce a national mining tax and a carbon tax; and

(3) decides that no legislation to impose a national mining tax or a carbon tax be considered by the House until after the October Tax Summit has reported. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

22   Cardiovascular disease: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Hall—That this House:

(1) notes that cardiovascular disease:

(a) is a heart, stroke and blood vessel disease;

(b) kills one Australian nearly every 11 minutes;

(c) affects more that 3.4 million Australians;

(d) prevents 1.4 million people from living a full life because of disability caused by the disease;

(e) affects one in five Australians, and two out of three families; and

(f) claimed the lives of almost 48 000 Australians (34 per cent of all deaths) in 2008—deaths that are largely preventable;

(2) notes that cardiovascular risk factors include:

(a) tobacco smoking;

(b) insufficient phys ical activity;

(c) poor nutrition;

(d) alcohol consumption;

(e) high blood pressure;

(f) high blood cholesterol;

(g) being overweight;

(h) having diabetes; and

(i) kidney (renal) failure;

(3) notes the importance of knowing the warning signs of hea rt attack:

(a) discomfort or pain in the centre of the chest;

(b) discomfort in the arms, neck, shoulders, jaw and back; and

(c) shortness of breath, nausea, cold sweat, dizziness or light headedness;

(4) notes that recognition of heart attack and earl y response increases cardiovascular awareness, saving lives and preventing related disability; and

(5) acknowledges that promotion of healthy eating and increased exercise will lead to healthier lifestyles and a reduction in cardiovascular disease. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

23   one-hundredth Anniversary of International Women’s Day: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Brodtmann—That this House acknowledges the:

(1) one-hundredth anniversary of International Women's Day on 8 March 2011 and celebrates the achievements of women throughout the world; and

(2) need to continue to fight against the barrier that stops women achieving equal rights and equal opportunities throughout the world. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

24   International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) by resolution 57/129 of 11 December 2002, the General Assembly designated 29 May as the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers to:

(i) pay tribute to all the men and women who have serve d and continue to serve in United Nations peacekeeping operations;

(ii) recognise their high level of professionalism, dedication and courage; and

(iii) honour the memory of those who have lost their lives in the cause of peace;

(b) on 29 May 2011 Aus tralia joins with other nations to commemorate United Nations workers who provide life-saving assistance to millions of people around the world; who work in conflict zones and areas of natural hazards; and who place their own lives at risk in the line of duty;

(c) Australia has been a strong supporter of United Nations peacekeeping operations since the first mission in 1947, and is one of the top 20 contributors to the United Nations peacekeeping budget;

(d) the United Nations’ total peacekeeping budget is US$7.8 billion, or half of one per cent of global military spending, indicating that building and keeping the peace is overwhelmingly cheaper than the pursuit of war;

(e) there are over 122 000 militar y and civilian men and women working in 15 different United Nations missions around the world, who are not there for personal gain, rather, they are engaged in maintaining peace and security and in building the political, social and economic infrastructure required to ensure conflict zones can make the transition to peace on a sustainable and lasting basis;

(f) in the last decade, more than 1100 United Nations peacekeepers have died while striving to help those most in need in some of the world's most hostile environments, with recent examples being in April 2011, when:

(i) 28 United Nations staff and 5 non-government organisations workers were killed in a plane crash in Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; and

(ii) 7 international United Nat ions staff were killed in an attack on a United Nations compound in Mazar-e-Sharif in northern Afghanistan, which was the third direct attack against United Nations personnel in Afghanistan in the past 18 months; and

(g) United Nations and other humanitar ian workers are increasingly being targeted for political and ideological reasons; and

(2) commends the vital work carried out by United Nations peacekeepers and other humanitarian workers and calls upon all United Nations member states to ensure the safe ty and security of United Nations peacekeepers and other humanitarian workers, and to appropriately punish perpetrators of violence against such workers. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

25   Uniform road laws and motor vehicle registration compliance standards: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Australian road laws and vehicle compliance standards vary between each of the States and Territories of Australia; and

(b) those variations are causing confusion and uncertainty to Austral ian motorists;

(2) calls on the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport to urge the States and Territories to adopt, through COAG, uniform road laws and motor vehicle registration compliance standards. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

26   Flooding of communities in the Torres Strait: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch—That this House:

(1)  notes the severe flooding effects taking place in the outer islands of the Torres Strait and the dire conditions the Torres Strait Islander people find themselves in each year;

(2) recognises that:

(a) the Torres Strait Islander people deserve the same rights as the people in flooded South-East Queensland;

(b) discrimination should not exist in one particular area of the nation;

(c) the Torres Strait Islander people have been experiencing flood devastation for the past four years with no help from Government; and

(d) sea wall infrastructure at six low-lying islands is inadequate and in urgent need of repair; and

(3)  in light of the evidence of continued flooding on the outer islands due to king tidal surges, calls on the Government to commit to restore and rebuild the damaged sea walls on the outer islands of the Torres Strait to protect the island communities from further devastation. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

27   Meat export industry: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Saffin—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that the Commonwealth is responsible for regulating the export of live animals, and for negotiating the arrangements and conditions that apply to the export of both live animals and chilled or frozen meat;

(b) that the current tariff barr iers that apply in some countries to chilled or frozen meat exports mean that there is not a level playing field between the two forms of export;

(c) that the Commonwealth has consistently campaigned for a reduction in tariffs on all agricultural exports;

(d) the national and international concerns about the welfare of animals transported under the live animal export trade, both during transportation and at their destination, have been raised and substantiated in campaigns by organisations and individuals including the World Society for the Protection of Animals, Stop Live Exports, Princess Alia of Jordan, the RSPCA and the Barristers Animal Welfare Panel; and

(e) that Australia is one of few countries that consistently treats animals humanely during slaughter and that Australian chilled or frozen meat has gained wide acceptance in the Middle East for its quality and observance of halal and kosher standards;

(2) acknowledges the opposition of the Australasian Meat Industry Employees Union and the local me at processors to the live export trade on the grounds that the live export trade has a detrimental effect on the local meat processing industry, affecting jobs and the Australian economy;

(3) calls for renewed consideration of a planned and supported transition in the medium term away from live exports and towards an expanded frozen and chilled meat export industry; and

(4) asks that Austrade be encouraged to be involved in negotiations to increase exports in frozen and chilled meat. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

28   Education and high school retention: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) t he importance of high school completion in equipping young people with the skills and education levels to translate into paid employment or further education opportunities;

(b) t he national rate of unemployment for persons aged 15 to 19 looking for full-time work was 24.2 per cent in January 2010; and

(c) the current rate for Fairfield-Liverpool region is 33.5 per cent;

(2) acknowledges that:

(a) e ducation and high school retention play a crucial part in improving youth employment opportunity;

(b) in 2009, the Year 10 to 12 apparent national retention rate was 76.7 per cent; and

(c) in South West Sydney the current retention rate is: 72.6 per cent;

(3) calls on:

(a) t he Government to continue its efforts to ensure an above 90 per cent high school retention rate nationwide by 2015 in order to reduce the youth unemployment rate; and

(b) local businesses to give, where possible, priority to the local youth searching for employment. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

29   National Youth Week: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Rowland—That this House:

(1) notes that National Youth Week is:

(a)  the largest celebration of young people in Australia and will take place on Friday 1 to Sunday 10 April 2011, with the theme ‘Own It’; and

(b) organised and run by young people aged between 12 and 25 from around Australia;

(2)  acknowledges and commits itself to addressing the significant public policy and social challenges faced by young Australians including the:

(a)  unacceptably high incidence of suicide amongst young people;

(b) prevalence of bullying and social stigmatisation, particularly in the form of cyber-bullying; and

(c) estimated tens of thousands of young people around Australia who are homeless on any given night;

(3)  applauds the outstanding contributions made by young people to a wide range of causes and volunteerism in their local communities and beyond, particularly a renewed emphasis on online participation in volunteering; and

(4) affirms its belief that a quality education remains a key determinant of opportunity and inclusiveness for young people. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

30   Biosecurity and quarantine: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That this House:

(1) a strong biosecurity and quarantine system is critical to Australia's rural and regional industries, jobs, consumers and our natural heritage;

(2) Australian law protects Australia from pests and diseases carried by overseas animals, plants and their products; and

(3) the application of Australian law will continue to be rigorously applied in Australia and defended against external challenge. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

31   World Tuberculosis Day: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Mr L. D. T. Ferguson—That this House:

(1) r ecognises that 24 March is World Tuberculosis Day, in observance of a disease that still claims the lives of 1.7 million people every year, and which:

(a) i s currently the leading killer of people living with HIV and the third leading killer of women;

(b) has the highest growth in the South East Asian region, which accounted for the largest number of new Tuberculosis cases in 2008; and

(c) could be dramatically reduced by improved detection and diagnosis;

(2) recognises that the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) currently provides more than two thirds of the global funding to combat Tuberculosis, and that:

(a)  Australia could supplement its recent pledge to the Global Fund to ensure that the resources for Tuberculosis as well as AIDS and Malaria are sufficient to achieve the goal of significantly reducing the number of people suffering from these diseases; and

(b) action by Australia to supplement its pledge would influence other donor countries to increase their pledges;

(3) acknowledges that the widespread adopt ion of the new Xpert diagnostic tool, which cuts the time for diagnosis from several weeks to two hours, would lead to significant improvements in the detection and treatment of Tuberculosis; and

(4) requests the Government facilitate the adoption of Xpert in South East Asia. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

32   Disability-inclusive Australian aid program: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) there are 650  million people living with disabilities worldwide and that approximately 80 per cent of those people live in developing countries, with 82 per cent of those living below the poverty line on an income of less than US$1.25 per day;

(b) children and young people can often be the hardest hit by disability, whether because a child has a disability or is caring for an adult with a disability; and

(c) UNESCO has found that 90 per cent of children with disabilities in developing countries do not attend school;

(2) notes that the Australian Government is:

(a)  committed to implementing changes in Australia’s development assistance designed to deliver better outcomes for people with disabilities, as outlined in the strategy Development for All: Towards a disability-inclusive Australian aid program ; and

(b) already held in high esteem internationally for its leadership in this field and in particular for the human rights-based approach taken to forming the strategy, in accordance with its adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and

(3) calls on the Australian Government to consider:

(a)  including the active participation of people with disabilities in its aid policy formulation, as well as incorporating monitoring mechanisms within aid funding to ensure that disability inclusive development is effectively measured; and

(b) any further ways in which AusAID and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade can continue their engagement with Disability-Inclusive Development policy to further strengthen Australia's commitment to this important cause. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

33   Humanitarian issues during the war in Sri Lanka: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr L. D. T. Ferguson—That this House:

(1) the Sri Lankan Government declared an end to the war in Sri Lanka in May 2009;

(2) on 22 June 2010 the United Nations Secretary-General appointed a panel of experts to advise him on accountability concerning any alleged violations of international human rights and humanitarian law during the final stages of the conflict in Sri Lanka;

(3) the panel:

(a) o fficially began its work on 16 September 2010; and

(b) is looking into the modalities, applicable international standards and comparative experience with regard to accountability processes, taking into account the nature and scope of any essential foundation for durable peace and reconciliation in Sri Lanka;

(4) t hrough the panel, the Secretary-General expects to enable the United Nations to make a constructive contribution in this regard;

(5) on 18 October 2010 the panel invited individuals and organisations to make submissions in respect of its work, and will accept submissions until 15 December 2010;

(6) in light of the panel’s review, Australia's close ties with Sri Lanka and continuing reports by several reputable human rights organisations, such as the International Crisis Group, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the Elders, as well as governments including in Britain, there has been a call for an international independent investigation into war crimes committed by all parties during the final stages of the war in Sri Lanka; and

(7) Australia, as a respected and responsible member of the international community and Asian neighbourhood, can help accomplish better outcomes in Sri Lanka in the return towards a civil society, particularly for the Tamil minority, and that such actions:

(a) would further assist with the creation of durable solutions to what has been a humanitarian crisis on Australia's doorstep in Sri Lanka; and

(b) could also help partially alleviate the flow of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

34   Donate Life Week: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) n otes that:

(a) Sunday 20 February to Sunday 27 February 2011 is Donate Life Week, Australia's national awareness week to promote organ and tissue donation; and

(b) organ donation is giving the gift of life, yet is a gift that most people do not know how to give;

(2) acknowledges that:

(a) one third of Australians do not know that family consent is needed for organs t o be donated when someone dies;

(b) there are more than 1000 people on organ donation waiting lists and were only 279 donations in 2009-10, despite that year being our highest annual donation rate in a decade; and

(c) on average, every deceased organ donor in Australia may contribute to between three and ten transplants;

(3) encourages all Australian men and women to:

(a) set some time aside during the week to talk about organ and tissue donations with people closest to them; and

(b) consider organ don ations and sign up for the Australian Organ Donor Register; and

(4) pays tribute to organ donors who have kindly given the gift of life. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

35   Obesity: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Hall—That this House:

(1) notes:

  1. that Australia is one of the most obese nations in the developed world;
  2. that obesity is a growing problem in Australia;
  3. the recommendations of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health and Ageing tabled on 1 June 2009;
  4. the findings and research of the George Institute and the Baker IDI Foundation;
  5. the findings and strategies developed by the National Preventative Health Taskforce in relation to obesity; and
  6. that the cost of the obesity epidemic to government at all levels is enormous and urgently needs to be addressed;

(2) calls on al l:

  1. levels of government to recognise the severity of the obesity problem in Australia and its cost;
  2. levels of government to continue to develop strategies to address Australia’s obesity epidemic; and
  3. communities, and those living in them, to adopt healthy lifestyles which include healthy eating and exercise; and

(3) acknowledges the contribution of the Minister for Health and Ageing in:

  1. raising community awareness of the obesity epidemic; and
  2. investing in preventative health programs. ( Order of the day wil l be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next sitting Mondays after 22  August 2011. )

36   Outstanding contributions during Queensland’s recent natural disasters: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011—Mr Christensen , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Neumann—That this House:

(1) notes the outstanding contribution of organisations and individuals in Queensland durin g the natural disasters of January 2011;

(2) acknowledges the following who all worked tirelessly to ensure the safety and security of residents in the evacuation period and beyond:

(a) t he State Emergency Service, Queensland Fire and Rescue Service, Rural Fire Brigades, St John's Ambulance Service, Queensland Ambulance Service, Queensland Police Service and Australian Defence Force;

(b) the Salvation Army, Lifeline, churches, charities and other community organisations; and

(c) flood affected school principals, teachers, staff and school communities; and

(3) expresses its deep appreciation for the courage, commitment and professionalism shown by these organisations and individuals. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

37   Viability of the Murray-Darling river system: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) s upport for a solution to return the Murray-Darling river system to health is widespread across Australia;

(b) a poll by the Australian Conservation Foundation found that 77 per cent of Australians agree that environmental degradation in the Murray-Darling Basin must be reversed;

(c) the Government is working towards an effective strategy for the integrated and sustainable management of water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin; and

(d) this strategy includes purchasing water for increased environmental flows, setting sustainable diversion limits on the quantity of water removed from the Basin, managing water quality and investing in water-saving infrastructure; and

(2) rec ognises that the Government:

(a)  has already began the task of returning the Murray-Darling river system to health through the Water for the Future plan;

(b) is working towards ensuring the long term viability of this river system for all those who rely on its precious water resources; and

(c) will continue to consult openly with all stakeholders in the Murray-Darling Basin. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

38   Violence in Western Sahara: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Saffin—That this House:

(1)   notes that the Government:

(a)  deeply regrets recent reports of violence in Western Sahara, and allegations of human rights violations with respect to Western Sahara;

(b) urges parties to uphold international human rights standards, and to maintain their resolve to work peacefully through these issues in the United Nations led process currently underway;

(c) strongly supports the efforts of the United Nations to find an enduring and mutually acceptable settlement in relation to Western Sahara;

(d) welcomes progress made during the third round of informal talks here on 8-9 November in New York between Morocco and the Polisario Front, facilitated by the United Nations Secretary General's Personal Envoy Christopher Ross, including agreement to further informal talks later in 2010;

(e)  calls on the parties to continue to work through these issues in the United Nations process underway; and

(f) hopes the next round of informal talks, scheduled for December 2010, will make further progress; and

(2)  fully supports:

(a)  the efforts of the United Nations Secretary General, his Special Envoy, and the United Nations to find an enduring settlement to the Western Sahara issue; and

(b) these concerns, calls, hopes and actions. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

39   Coptic Orthodox community of Egypt: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou—That this House:

(1) condemns the New Year’s Day attack on the Al-Qiddissin Church, the Church of the Two Saints, in Alexandria, Egypt;

(2) a cknowledges the historical role of the Coptic Orthodox community of Egypt;

(3) expresses its condolences to all victims of violence and terrorism;

(4) reaffirms the Australian Government's call for fundamental political reform in Egypt and the protection of the rights of all Egyptian citizens; and

(5) recognises:

(a) the contributions made by the Coptic Orthodox community of Australia under the leadership of His Grace Bishop Suriel of the Coptic Orthodox Church Diocese of Melbourne and Affiliated Regions;

(b) the value and role of interfaith di alogue in building a diverse and harmonious society; and

(c) the value of democratic rights and the right to freedom of religion and culture. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

40   Australian arts community: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett—That this House:

(1)  recognises the conclusion of a great television police drama, The Bill , and thanks the ABC for its long standing commitment to the program;

(2) acknowledges that since 1983, The Bill , has kept many of us from fully engaging with the broader Australian arts community on a Saturday night;

(3) recognises the broad contribution that our local arts make to Australian society and culture;

(4) reaffirms our commitment to the arts and to engaging with our local performers, artists and writers (particularly on our now Bill -less Saturday nights); and

(5) calls on the Minister for the Arts to lead Australia into a new era of artistic development and excellence and for all Australians to better support their local live performances. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

41   Public libraries: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) notes the importance of public libraries in communities across Australia;

(2) recognises that:

(a) various state-based research provides clear evidence of the contribution and value of public libraries in terms of the triple bottom line: economic, environmental and social impact; and

(b) recognises that libraries provide access to information technology, research, educational resources and recreational materials for many people who otherwise could not afford them;

(3) congratulates public library staff for their commitment to facilit ating life long learning in the community;

(4) supports the wide availability of public library collections as a way to help address disadvantage by ensuring free and equitable access to collections for all community members;

(5) notes that in 2008-09, 7.7 million Australians visited a library and the total asset value of library collections in this country was $4.3 billion;

(6) expresses concern over the action instigated by Liverpool City Council to investigate the viability of closing Green Valley, Miller, Moorebank and Casula public libraries; and

(7) specifically notes the community outrage and concern as a result of this decision, giving regard to the proven benefits of local public libraries as noted above. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

42   Security in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms A. E. Burke—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo continues to suffer from high levels of poverty, insecurity, and a culture of impunity, i n which illegal armed groups and military forces continue to commit widespread human right abuses;

(b) that, according to a study by the International Rescue Committee released in January 2008, conflict and related humanitarian crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo have resulted in the deaths of an estimated 5 400 000 people since 1998, and continue to cause as many as 45 000 deaths each year; and

(c) the mismanagement and illicit trade of extractive resources from the Democratic Republic of Congo supports conflict between militias and armed domestic factions in neighbouring countries; and

(2) calls on the Government to promote peace and security in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo by supporting efforts of the Government of the Democratic Rep ublic of Congo, civil society groups, and the international community to monitor and stop commercial activities involving natural resources that contribute to illegal armed groups and human rights violations. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

43   Proposed amendments to the Family Law Act 1975 : Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Neumann—That this House:

(1)  notes that in 2006, the Howard Government made sweeping changes to the Family Law Act 1975 in parenting matters, and that these changes:

(a)  elevated the rights of parents above the need to protect children; and

(b) have been analysed and criticised in the following reports:

(i)  Family Courts violence review by Professor Richard Chisholm, former Justice of the Family Court;

(ii)  Evaluation of the family law reforms by the Australian Institute of Family Studies; and

(iii)  Improving responses to family violence in the family law system by the Family Law Council;

(2)  acknowledges that on 11 November 2010, the Hon. Robert McClelland, Attorney-General, released a draft bill Family Law Amendment (Family Violence) Bill 2010 (the Bill) for public consultation open to 14 January 2011, proposing amendments to the Family Law Act 1975 to provide better protection for children and families at risk of violence;

(3) supports the Federal Labor Government in taking steps to protect children from abuse, neglect and family violence; and

(4) urges the Federal Labor Government to proceed with the Bill to ensure that the best interest of the child is the paramount consideration in all court proceedings in relation to children. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 22 August 2011. )

44   white ribbon day: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes—That this House:

(1) notes that 25 November marks White Ribbon Day, the symbol of the United Nations’ International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women;

(2) recognises that White Ribbon Day aims to prevent violence against women by increasing public awareness and education by challenging the attitudes and behaviours that allow violence to continue;

(3) asks all Australian men to challenge these attitudes and behaviours, so that we can begin to drive real change in our community;

(4) asks all Australian men to join the ‘My Oath Campaign’ and take the oath: I swear never to commit, excuse or remain silent about violence against women;

(5) notes with concern that one in three women will experience physical violence, and one in five will experience sexual violence over their lifetime;

(6) understands that domestic and family violence are primary causes of homelessness;

(7) acknowledges the cost of violence against women and their children to the Australian economy was estimated to be $13.6 billion in 2008-09, and if we take no action to shine a light on this violence, that cost will hit an estimated $15.6 billion by 2021-22; and

(8) asks all Members to show that they are challenging violence against women by wearing a white ribbon or wristband on White Ribbon Day. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 22 August 2011. )

45   united nations convention on the rights of the child: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 17 December 2010 Australia will celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child;

(b) the Convention on the Rights of the Child is an attempt to ensure that children everywhere have the best opportunity in life regardless of where they live, their race or gender, including the right to go to school, to have access to shelter and food, to play and to have their opinions heard and respected; and

(c) there has been significant progress in that 10 000 fewer children die per day than they did twenty years ago but there are still 8 million children dying each year before their fifth birthdays of causes that are easily preventable through such simple and inexpensive measures as insecticide-treated mosquito nets, vaccinations, breast-feeding for six months, clean water and sanitation;

(2) applauds the work done for the benefit of children inte rnationally by United Nations agencies, in particular UNICEF (the United Nations Children’s Fund), and Non Government Organisations, such as World Vision, Save the Children and Marie Stopes International;

(3) notes that while on the whole children in Australia fare better than children in other parts of the world, there remains significant issues to be tackled in Australia including child abuse and neglect, youth homelessness and the disadvantage suffered by indigenous children;

(4) applauds the work done for the benefit of Australian children by the National Association for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, as well as the Australian Human Rights Commission and Child Commissioners in the States and Territories;

(5) welcomes the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020 as endorsed at the Council of Australian Governments meeting on 30 April 2009; and

(6) calls upon the Federal Government to further consider:

(a) incorporating the Convention on the Rights of the Child in Fe deral legislation; and

(b) appointing a National Commissioner for Children. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 22 August 2011. )

46   Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Sidebottom—That this House:

(1)  acknowledges the Government's recent increased commitment to the replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, which:

(a) increased the previous commitment of $145 million in 2008-10, to $210 million for the 2011-13 period;

(b) recognised the importance of the Global Fund in the treatment and prevention of AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the three major infectious diseases;

(c) acknowledges the Global Fund as a highly effective funding mechanism for promoting global health and preventing 5.7 million deaths from AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in some of the world poorest countries; and

(d) recognises the need to better fund the work of the Global Fund to deliver increases in the provision of antiretroviral therapy, tuberculosis treatment, long lasting insecticidal nets to prevent malaria, and treatment of women for mother-to-child transmission of HIV; and

(2)  urges all aid donor countries in the world to fund their fair share of the global amount required by the Fund, which is estimated to be $20 billion over the next three years. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 22 August 2011. )

47   Daw Aung San Suu Kyi: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Saffin—That this House:

(1) w elcomes, on behalf of the Australian people, the release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest;

(2) congratulates the Burmese pro-democracy movement for its steadfast resistance to military rule and ongoing campaign for democracy;

(3) calls for the immediate and unconditional release of the more than 2000 political prisoners still detained in Burma;

(4) calls upon Burmese authorities to embark on a genuine process of national reconciliation and engage in dialogue with all of Burma's ethnic groups; and

(5) calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)  make the most of this opportunity to bring about lasting reform for Burma and its people;

(b) reinforce the campaign for political reform in Burma with increased engagement through government and diplomatic channels;

(c) maintain efforts to enforce a universal arms embargo against Burma; and

(d) support at the highest levels of Government the efforts of Aung San Suu Kyi and her colleagues to restore democracy and peace. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 22 August 2011. )

48   Population growth: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010—Mr Alexander , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Ripoll—That this House:

(1) the Intergenerational Report 2010 predicts Australia’s population may reach 35.9 million by 2050;

(2) population growth continues to be centred around Australia’s capital cities;

(3) the electorate of Oxley contains parts of Ipswich East, one of the statistical areas that has seen the largest population increases in Australia between 2004 and 2009;

(4) continuing population growth is placing pressure on the sustainability of Australian cities and the lifestyles of their residents;

(5) a ‘business as usual’ approach to planning and development will no longer be sufficient for the future needs of Australian cities;

(6) building Sustainable Cities must become a policy priority for all levels of government; and

(7) the future sustainability of Australian cities must include a need to ‘decentralise’ the capital cities and encourage major employers, such as government department, to regional and outer urban centres. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 22 August 2011. )

49   organ donation: Resumption of debate ( from 15 November 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Brodtmann—That this House:

(1) notes th at:

(a) organ donor rates are showing slow and sustained improvement in 2010;

(b) more than 98 per cent of Australians agree that organ and tissue donation have the potential to save and improve lives, yet less than 60 per cent of Australians accept the invitation for their loved ones to become organ donors when asked;

(c) there are more than 1700 Australians on the transplant waiting list at any time;

(d) many more Australians cannot get into waiting lists as they are too sick or unlikely to receive a life saving transplant because there are not enough donors; and

(e ) the Government has invested more than $150 million over four years to establish a coordinated approach to organ donation, enabling all jurisdictions to work cooperatively to support sustained improvements in organ donation in Australia; and

(2) acknowle dges:

(a) the selfless act of the 228 donor families who have already donated organs in 2010 (to 30 September), which has saved or improved the lives of at least 683 Australians;

(b) the work undertaken across jurisdictions led by the National Medical Di rector of the Australian Organ and Tissue Authority, State and Territory Medical Directors and clinical groups to develop nationally consistent protocols and clinical triggers;

(c) the support of community groups such as Gift of Life, Kidney Health Australia, Transplant Australia, the Organ Donation and Transplant Foundation of Western Australia and the David Hookes Foundation, which are integral in supporting the work of clinicians in improving organ donor rates; and

(d) the importance of a steady and sustained improvement in organ donor rates to support Australia’s quest to become a world leader in organ and tissue donation and transplantation. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

50   human rights in iran: Resumption of debate ( from 15 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Neumann—That this House:

(1)  notes with deep concern the ongoing human rights violations in Iran, including the:

(a)  use of the death penalty, especially the use of stoning as a method of execution;

(b) violations of the rights of women;

(c) repeated violations of due process of law;

(d) use of violence, intimidation and arbitrary arrest to suppress peaceful opposition activity and the impact this has on the ability of Iranians to exercise their freedom of expression, association and assembly;

(e)  reported arbitrary arrest and detention, and torture of opposition protestors;

(f) discrimination against and failure to protect the rights of minorities, including the Bahá’í, Sufi, Baluch, and Kurdish communities; and

(g) trial and reported sentencing of seven Bahá’í leaders—Fariba Kamalabadi, Jamaloddin Khanjani, Afif Naeimi, Saeid Rezaie, Mahvash Sabet, Behrouz Tavakkoli, and Vahid Tizfahm—for insulting religious sanctities and propaganda against the Islamic Republic; and

(2) calls upon the G overnment of the Islamic Republic of Iran to:

(a)  ensure that the rights of all individuals are fully protected, without discrimination, and that it fulfils its obligations to its own citizens as set out in the Iranian constitution;

(b) abide by its international human rights obligations, including the rights to freedom of religion or belief as set out in Article 18 of the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights; and

(c) ensure that all trials, including the case of the seven Bahá’í leaders, are fair and transparent and conducted in accordance with Iran's international obligations. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

51   pensions: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Adams—That this House:

(1) notes that pensions must keep pace with the cost of living;

(2) recognises the significance and importance of the Labor Government’s $14 billion reform of the pension system after over 11 years of Coalition inaction;

(3) understands that when there is a Commonwealth pension rise, some of it is likely to be absorbed into pensioners’ rising living costs, often as a result of States and Territories lifting housing rents and power costs;

(4) notes the danger that pensioners are at risk of becoming impoverished if State and Territory governments do not allow the benefits of pension increases to flow through to pensioners; and

(5) demands that all State and Territory Governments commit to permanently quarantining last September’s pension rise, in the calculation of pensioners’ public housing rent levels and other State and Territory government controlled costs. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

52   surf life saving australia: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Lyons—That this House:

(1) acknowledges and congratulates the over 153 000 volunteer members and staff of Surf Life Saving Australia;

(2) notes that:

(a) Surf Life Saving Australia faces many challenges in looking after the na tion’s largest and most popular playground, our beaches, with over 100 million beach visitations each year; and

(b) in its 103 years of service, Surf Life Saving Australia is defying trends by increasing volunteer numbers, which is a great reflection of an organisation strongly connected to unique Aussie lifestyle, culture and adaptability;

(3) supports Surf Life Saving Australia’s efforts in advocating for nationally consistent standards for coastal safety services, systems and signage;

(4) acknowledges Surf Life Saving Australia’s international aid and development programs in 25 countries, mainly in the Asia Pacific region, playing its part in showcasing the nation’s global goodwill; and

(5) supports the establishment of bi-partisan ‘Friends of Surf Life Saving’ amongst Members of Parliament and Senators, providing the opportunity for Surf Life Saving Australia to keep the country’s leaders informed about the humanitarian, social and economic value of Surf Life Saving Australia to the Australian community. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

53   national carers week: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Owens—That this House:

(1) recognises:

(a) that the week of 17 to 23 October was National Carers Week;

(b) that there are more than 2.6 million carers in Australia;

(c) the caring role is one of immense social a nd economic value, with carers being the foundation of our health, aged, palliative and community care systems;

(d) as health care increasingly moves away from ‘institutional’ settings into the home and community, family carers shoulder greater responsibility for managing complex conditions and providing the emotional and physical support for the person for whom they are caring;

(e) without carers, no future health or community care system will be able to respond to changing demographics and health needs, clinical practices and societal influences, in the long term;

(f) the Government’s practical measures to improve the lives of carers through significant reforms across the disability, health, mental health and aged care service systems, including:

(i) d elivering a $60 a fortnight increase to the base pension plus an increase of $5 a fortnight in the new Pension Supplement for carers receiving the maximum single rate of Carer Payment (a total increase of around $100 per fortnight, after indexation increases from 20 March);

(ii) guaranteeing the certainty of an annual ongoing Carers Supplement of $600 for each person cared for, benefiting around 500 000 carers;

(iii) overhauling the complex and restrictive eligibility requirements for Carer Payment (Child);

(iv) significantly boosting funding to the State and Territory governments for specialist disability services including supported accommodation, in-home care and respite; and

(v) commissioning the Productivity Commission to examine the feasibility, costs and benefits of a National Long Term Disability Care and Support Scheme; and

(2) calls on the Government to renew its commitment to carers in this Parliament and to exercise all instruments of policy to support carers in their vital work. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )

54   cord blood donations: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010 ) on the motion of Mrs D'Ath—That this House recognises:

(1) that many lives have been s aved through the research and the use of organ and blood donations throughout Australia;

(2) that one form of donation is cord blood from the umbilical cord and placenta, and that:

(a) research has shown that his blood is a rich source of blood forming s tem cells known as haemopoietic stem cells;

(b) the use of these cells for transplantation to a sufferer of leukaemia, lymphoma, and some tumours, provides the best chance for a cure; and

(c) recent research has established that umbilical cord blood stem cells can demonstrate plasticity, suggesting a role for them in the treatment of diseases such as diabetes, cerebral vascular disease, and Parkinson’s disease;

(3) that the collection of umbilical cord blood cells for research and for processing is a saf e and non-invasive procedure, and that this procedure does not involve the destruction of an embryo given that the umbilical cord and placenta are usually discarded as waste;

(4) that the collection of umbilical cord blood is not available in all States and Territories or hospitals throughout Australia, and that:

(a) the collection, processing and storage of umbilical cord blood requires specialised techniques by appropriately trained and accredited professionals; and

(b) based on limitations on the coll ection centres that currently exist, not all permissions for donations given by women at existing collection centres results in the actual collection of the cord blood;

(5) that the Federal Government already funds the Australian National Cord Blood Coll ection Network;

(6) the great work being done by the Australian National Cord Blood Collection Network, AusCord, the Australian national network of umbilical cord blood banks and cord blood collection centres; and

(7) that refocused cord blood collection and banking strategies that enable greater matching of donations to those people who need them would increase the clinical value of Australia’s cord blood collection. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 August 2011. )