Save Search

Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document

Committee and delegation reports

Order of the day

1   Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee—REPORT 419: inquiry into the auditor-general act 1997 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 February 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Oakeshott—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

 
 
 

Matters to be reported from the Main Committee—private Members’ business

1   overseas trained doctors: Resumption of debate ( from 18 October 2010—Mr Georganas , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Scott—That this House calls for:

(1) an inquiry into the role of Australia’s medical and surgical colleges in the registration process of medical graduates and overseas trained doctors; and

(2) the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship to delay the revocation of 457 visas for those doctors who have been deregistered due to failure of the Pre Employment Structured Clinical Interview, to allow adequate time for a review of their case and reassessment of their competency. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Wednesday 17 November 2010, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

2   detention facility at inverbrackie, SA: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Briggs—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) t he announcement on 18 October 2010 by the Prime Minister and the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship about the commissioning of a detention facility at Inverbrackie in South Australia costing $9.7 million to accommodate 400 people, consisting of family groups who are undergoing refugee status assessment;

(b) that the Prime Minister and the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship failed to consult with the State Government of SA, the Adelaide Hills Council and the local Woodside community on the commissioning of this facility; and

(c) that the Prime Minister visited the Adelaide Hills on the Sunday 17 October 2010 immediately prior to the announcement and made no mention of the plan to commission the detention facility at Inverbrackie;

(2) p rovides a reference to the Joint Standing Committee on Migration to undertake the following inquiry:

(a) that the Joint Standing Committee on Migration inquire int o the commissioning of a detention facility for 400 people comprising family groups at Inverbrackie, including:

(i) t he suitability of the site for locating a detention facility for the purpose of accommodating family groups in comparison with alternative options available to the Department of Immigration and Citizenship;

(ii) the impact of the operation of the facility on the local community, including on health, education, recreation, transport, police and other community services;

(iii) the impact on defence operations, personnel and family groups based at the Inverbrackie facility;

(iv) the impact of the facility on the local economy and small business;

(v) the level of community support for the commissioning of the facility;

(vi) t he level of cost and extent of services and facilities provided to clients at the detention facility; and

(vii) potential risks that need to be managed for the successful operation of the facility;

(b) t hat the Joint Standing Committee on Migration undertake public hearings in Woodside, SA and Canberra, ACT to facilitate the participation of community members, local service providers, council officers and state and federal departmental officials to assist the Committee with its inquiry; and

(c) that the Joint Standing Committee on Migration report back no later than the first sitting week of Parliament in 2011; and

(3) c alls on the Government to postpone commissioning the detention facility for 400 people including family groups at Inverbrackie, until such time as the Committee has reported and the Government has provided a response to that report to the Parliament. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Wednesday 24 November 2010, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

 
 
 

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Tuesday, 14 June 2011

*1   Mr Chester: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) the social and economic impact of wild dogs on the sheep, cattle and goat industry across Australia;

(b) the enviro nmental impact of wild dogs preying on Australia native wildlife; and

(c) that according to the Australian Pest Animals Strategy, pest animal management requires coordination among all levels of government in partnership with industry, land and water managers and the community; and

(2) highlights the need for a nationally consistent approach to effective wild dog control and ongoing Commonwealth funding to support research and on the ground work to reduce the impact of wild dogs on regional Australians. ( Notice given 2 June 2011. )

*2   Mrs D'Ath: To move—That this House:

(1) expresses:

(a) its condolences to:

(i) the family of Senior Constable Damian Leeding who was shot in t he line of duty on Sunday evening, 29 May 2011; and

(ii) the colleagues of Senior Constable Leeding at Coomera CIB, Queensland Police Service; and

(b) our gratitude to men and women who serve in our police forces across Australia for the burden placed up on them and the sacrifices they make to protect others; and

(2) a cknowledges:

(a) the risks associated with the work performed by our men and women in the police forces across Australia and the bravery that they display in the performance of their duty; and

(b) the husbands, wives and partners of serving police officers for their support of those who serve in our police forces. ( Notice given 2 June 2011. )

*3   Mr Hartsuyker: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that the abnormally wet weather in late 2010 and early 2011 devastated the sugar industry on the NSW north coast; and

(b) the major impact of this weather on the sugar industry on the NSW north coast;

(2) acknowle dges that many farmers planted crops twice but lost both as a result of the flood events of December 2010 and January 2011;

(3) recognises that as a result, there are currently 6000 hectares of sugar cane crops which remain implanted in Northern NSW;

(4) notes the replanting proposal put forward by Canegrowers NSW; and

(5) calls on the:

(a) Commonwealth and NSW Governments to increase the level of assistance provided to farmers from $15 000 to $25 000, similar to the level of assistance provided to Quee nsland and Victorian farmers; and

(b) Government to respond to the proposal made by Canegrowers NSW as a matter of urgency. ( Notice given 2 June 2011. )

*4   Mr Hayes: To move—That this House:

(1) notes with concern that on 30 May 2011 in the People's Court of Ben Tre, Vietnam, the following seven people were tried and convicted under Section 2 of Article 79 of the penal code, ‘Attempting to overthrow the people's administration ’:

(a) Ms Tran Thi Thuy (8 years imprisonment and 5 years probation);

(b) Mr Pham Van Thong (7 years and 5 years probation);

(c) Pastor Duong Kim Khai (6 years and 5 years probation);

(d) Mr Cao Van Tinh (5 years and 4 years probation);

(e) Mr Nguyen Tha nh Tam (2 years and 3 years probation);

(f) Mr Nguyen Chi Thanh (2 years and 3 years probation); and

(g) Ms Pham Ngoc Hoa (2 years and 3 years probation);

(2) further notes all seven were advocates for democratic reform, and had:

(a) participated in n on-violent protest;

(b) prepared and distributed material affirming Vietnamese sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly Islands;

(c) petitioned the State for redress on behalf of local landholders; and

(d) as members of the ‘Cattle Shed Congregation’ of the Mennonite Church, engaged in peaceful advocacy for social justice; and

(3) expresses its concern that the authorities of Vietnam appear to be using legal processes to rationalise human rights abuse and to silence peaceful opposition; and

(4) calls o n the Government to use the full weight of its diplomatic relations with Vietnam to lobby for substantial reform in human rights and basic freedoms in accordance with the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which both Australia and Vietnam are parties. ( Notice given 2 June 2011. )

Notices continued

1   Ms Owens: To move—That this House congratulates:

(1) Australia’s Commonwealth Games athletes, coaches and support staff on a job well done in Delhi; and

(2) all our athletes who competed strongly, in good spirit and brought home 74 gold, 55 silver and 48 bronze;

(3) the Indian people for their generous hospitality to Australia’s team; and

(4) the Indian people and the Indian Government for a well run Games, which kept all visitors safe, shared Indian-rich cultural traditions with the world and showed a glimpse of the future of Delhi as a truly global city. ( Notice given 18 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 20 June 2011. )

2   Ms Saffin: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) 10 October was World Mental Health Day and many Australians, organisations and governments undertook activities to recognise this;

(b) many Australians li ving with mental health problems, along with the families, friends and carers, live with these each and every day of the year; and

(c) services are sometimes non-existent, not appropriate, or inaccessible;

(2) supports measures to build a better way of r esponding to the myriad of needs for people who suffer mental health;

(3) acknowledges the call of the Mental Health Council of Australia for Australians to check on the mental health of those they care about, not be afraid to put their mental health and well being higher on their own agenda, and to be active about mental health not just on 10 October, but every day of the year;

(4) notes the words of the Mental Health Council in its public comments for World Mental Health Day: ‘World Mental Health Day is a time to focus on what we have achieved and hope to achieve in mental health…With the personal commitment of the Prime Minister, a new Minister for Mental Health and all major parties talking about the need for increased investment in mental health, 2010 must be the year in which mental health reform ends some of the systemic discrimination against people who experience a mental illness.’ (David Crosbie, CEO of the Mental Health Council); and

(5) applauds the fact that we have for the first time a Minister for Mental Health, a Shadow Minister for Mental Health and a Greens Spokesperson for Mental Health. ( Notice given 18 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 20 June 2011. )

3   Mr C. R. Thomson: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) in 1950, the Wyong water catchment valleys on the NSW Central Coast were proclaimed a Water Catchment District, with the Wyong Shire Council as the co nsent authority;

(b) the implementation of Part 3A legislation by the NSW State Government has over-ridden the authority of local government to refuse consent for the Wallarah II (Wyong Areas Joint Coal Venture) coal mine proposal to proceed;

(c) if the Wallarah II coal mine was to proceed, it would have a significant and adverse impact on the environment, in particular, on the Wyong Water Catchment Valleys, which supply over 50 per cent of the potable water to the 310 000 residents of the Central Coast region of NSW; and

(d) local government authorities within the Central Coast region have, for a period of at least five years, jointed with the community in an ongoing fight to stop the Wallarah II coal mine and thereby protect the region’s most valuable and major water resource; and

(2) requests the Australian Government to consider refusing the grant of a coal export licence to the South Korean Government-owned company, Kores, in respect of the Wallarah II Coal Mine proposal. ( Notice given 18 October 2010 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 20 June 2011. )

4   Mr Neumann: To move—That this House:

(1)  notes that:

(a)  South East Queensland is one of Australia's fastest growing regions with one in seven Australians living there;

(b) South East Queensland will be home to over 4.4 million people by 2031;

(c) the Federal Government has cooperated with the Queensland State Government in managing and planning for growth in South East Queensland ;

(d) the Queensland State Government's South East Queensland Regional Plan 2009-31 has identified vital infrastructure to sustain communities in South East Queensland;

(e) the Federal Government has embarked upon an unprecedented Nation Building Infrastructure Investment Program concerning South East Queensland for 2008-09 to 2013-14; and

(f) the Federal Government proposes, through its Regional Infrastructure Fund, to invest in South East Queensland in road and rail; and

(2) s upports the Federal Government's efforts to address capacity constraints, improve road safety, enhance transport connections and assist the various communities of South East Queensland. ( Notice given 25 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

5   Ms Owens: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) t hat during October and November Australian Hindus celebrate the Deepavali Festival;

(b) Deepavali, is the most widely celebrated festival of people of Indian sub-continental heritage, and:

(i)  Deepavali means rows of lights, and is the festival symbolising the dispelling of darkness, myths and perceptions; and

(ii) darkness represents ignorance and light is a metaphor for knowledge, therefore, lighting a lamp represents the destruction of all negative forces such as, wickedness, violence, lust, anger, greed, bigotry, fear, injustice and oppression, with knowledge; and

(c) that Deepavali celebrations are being held in all capital cities around the country with the largest event, at Parramatta Stadium, growing from strength to strength; and

(2) recognises:

(a) t he contribution of Hindu Australians and Australians of Indian Sub-Continent heritage to Australian society as a story of hard work and determination for a better life; and

(b) thanks Australian Hindus and Australian's of sub-continent heritage for sharing, with us, their rich and vibrant cultural traditions. ( Notice given 25 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

6   Ms Owens: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) e very year, on 11 November at 11 a.m.—the 11 hour of the 11 day of the 11 month—we pause to remember those men and women who have died or suffered in all wars conflicts and peace operations;

(b) by this act of remembrance, we remind ourselves that this special place that we live in, and the way of life we enjoy, has been hard won, through the commitment and sacrifice of those who served—paid for with lives cut off, with hopes and aspirations destroyed; and

(c) it is a precious inheritance willed to us by the men and women who served, and continue to serve; and

(2) honours and thanks:

(a) the great gift given to us by those who serve our country;

(b) those that gave their lives;

(c) those whose loved ones lie in foreign soil; and

(d) all those that lived through the mud and the horror and continue to stand with us today. ( Notice given 25 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

7   Ms Owens: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that 8 to 14 November is National Recycling Week;

(b) now in its fifteenth year, National Recycling Week is an established and highly regarded annual education and behaviour change campaign, aimed at improving the environmental benefits of kerbside, industrial and community recycling programs;

(2) congratulates a ll Australians who take part in National Recycling Week by attending a Big Aussie Swap or a Friday File Fling; and

(3) encourages all Australians to access accurate recycling information through the Recycling Near You Website , or by calling the Hotline on 1300 733 712. ( Notice given 25 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

8   Mr Georganas: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a)  25 November is designated by the United Nations as International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and that the white ribbon is the symbol for this day;

(b) on 25 November around Australia, thousands of men and women will be wearing a white ribbon to show their support for this cause and taking an oath to never to commit, excuse or remain silent about violence against women; and

(c) White Ribbon Day aims to build cultural change around the issue of violence against women through education and by promoting a culture of non-violence and respect, particularly among men and boys;

(2) recognises that:

(a)  violence against women remains the most widespread human rights abuse in the world—one in three Australian women has experienced violence, and one in five Australian women will experience sexual assault;

(b) violence against women occurs in many forms including domestic violence; general assault; homicide; femicide; rape and sexual assault; homophobic violence; genital mutilation; enforced prostitution, motherhood and abortion; and elder abuse; and

(c) violence against women and their children was estimated to cost the Australian economy around $13.6 billion in 2008-09 and, without a reduction in current rates, will cost the economy an estimated $15.6 billion by 2021-22; and

(3) commits itself to:

(a)  supporting the White Ribbon Day campaign;

(b) the elimination of violence against women; and

(c) a zero tolerance approach to all violence in our communities. ( Notice given 26 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

9   Mr Katter: To move—That this House resolves:

(1)  that a Community Water Protection Act be introduced into the Parliament incorporating a direction that the Murray-Darling Basin Authority (the Authority) endeavour to optimise social, economic and environmental outcomes;

(2) to support legislation which will meet the following objectives:

(a) t hat the objects of the Act include consideration of water saving measures and, if required, the impact of buybacks on:

(i)  individuals and communities in impacted areas;

(ii) larger cities, due in part, but not restricted to, migration from impacted areas;

(iii) national food affordability and food security; and

(iv) international export earning and threat to Australian public health and danger to Australian ecosystems by major increases in the amount of food being imported; and

(b) that the  Authority be required to:

(i) a ssess and publish the social and economic effects of the proposed buybacks on:

individuals and communities in impacted areas;

- larger cities, due in part, but not restricted to, migration from impacted areas;

- national food affordability and food security; and

- international export earning and threat to Australian public health and danger to Australian ecosystems by major increases in the amount of food being imported;

(ii) a nalyse, consider and publish all water saving measures, including water saving technology;

(iii) prepare a report with recommendations based on the objects of the Act; and

(iv) present this report to Parliament; and

(3) to make an assessment and determination of the Authority’s report before any buyback program is commenced. ( Notice given 27 October 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

10   Mr Hayes: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) 10 December 2010 is Human Rights Day;

(b) Human R ights Day marks the anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly's adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and is the most important commemorative day of the human rights calendar;

(c) the theme for Human Rights Day 2010 is ‘human rights defenders who act to end discrimination’; and

(d) human rights defenders act against discrimination, exclusion, oppression and violence, often at great personal risk both to themselves and their families;

(2) acknowledges that:

(a) there are Governments and regimes in the world which do not afford their citizens the fundamental human rights that we freely enjoy in Australia;

(b) one such Government operates in Vietnam, where there are more than 400 people imprisoned for exercising their fundamental human rights and who have been accused of crimes such as supporting political groups not recognised by the state, criticising government policies, calling for democracy, giving interviews to foreign journalists and providing legal advice to other dissidents on trial;

(c) as a nation we should be doing all that we can to urge the Vietnamese Government to adhere to the International Bill of Human Rights, which Vietnam ratified in 1982; and

(3) calls on the Government to:

(a) use the full weight of i ts diplomatic relations with Vietnam to strongly lobby for substantial reform when it comes to basic freedoms for its people; and

(b) continue its commitment to lobby and advocate for human rights in all countries. ( Notice given 16 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

11   Mr Bandt: To move—That this House:

(1)  notes that:

(a)  overwork is a significant problem for many Australian workers;

(b) research by the Australia Institute has shown that the typical full-time employee works 70 minutes of unpaid overtime a day, which equates to six and a half standard working weeks a year, effectively meaning that Australian workers are ‘donating’ more than their annual leave entitlement back to their employers in the form of unpaid overtime;

(c)  excessive working hours can have negative consequences for physical and mental health, for relationships with loved ones, and for the broader community; and

(d)  to focus attention on the ongoing problem of work/life balance, Wednesday 24 November is National Go Home on Time Day, an initiative of the Australia Institute that is supported by beyondblue, VicHealth, the Australian Health Promotion Association, the Public Health Association of Australia, and many other organisations; and

(2)  acknowledges the positive and simple message behind Go Home on Time Day, and encourages employees and employers to take part on 24 November. ( Notice given 16 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

12   Mr Abbott: To move—That this House calls on the Prime Minister to immediately publicly release the full business case in relation to the National Broadband Network to justify the Government’s expenditure of $43 billion dollars. ( Notice given 18 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

13   Mr Bandt: To move—That this House supports the agreement reached by logging industry representatives and non government organisations on the future for Tasmania’s forests. ( Notice given 22 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

14   Mr Bandt: To move—That this House:

(1) supports the principle of equal pay for equal work;

(2) notes that the:

(a) S ocial and Community Services (SACS) sector equal remuneration case is currently before Fair Work Australia;

(b) Heads of Agreement made between the Government and the Australian Services Union (ASU), signed by the Prime Minister when she was Minster for Workplace Relations, includes an acknowledgment of the potential budgetary impacts of the case and the agreement of the ASU to a gradual phase-in of any wage increase that results; and

(c) anger, disappointment and concern in the SACS sector that the Government's submission to Fair Work Australia shows the Government backtracking on its commitment to pay equity; and

(3) c alls on the Government to re-commit to the principle of pay equity and acknowledge that given the SACS sector provides many essential services on behalf of the Government, the Government has the primary responsibility to fund any pay increases necessary to achieve pay equity in the sector. ( Notice given 23 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

15   Mr Champion: To move—That this House:

(1) notes the:

(a) Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC) created under the Howard Government’s industrial relations legislation unfairly targets workers in the construction industry; and

(b) Government believes the curren t ABCC should be abolished and replaced with a new inspectorate that is part of the Fair Work Australia system; and

(2) calls on all Members to support the abolition of the ABCC to restore fairness in the construction industry for workers and employers. ( Notice given 24 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

16   Mr Bandt: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Christmas Day falls on a Saturday in 2010;

(b) in some parts of Australia, notably Victoria, SA, the NT and the ACT, workers who are working on Christmas Day will not receive public holiday penalty rates;

(c) the Tasmanian Parliament recently moved to ensure workers in Tasmania received fair compensation this Christmas; and

(d) it is unjust for workers having to work on Christmas Day not to receive appropriate remuneration for having to sacrifice time with family and friends at Christmas; and

(2) c alls on the Government to ensure a common standard across the country that public holiday penalty rates are paid to all workers who have to work on Christmas Day regardless of the day of the week Christmas falls on. ( Notice given 24 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

17   Mr Champion: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that all workers are entitled to spend time with their families and friends on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve regardless of their profession; and

(2) calls on all State and Territory governments to legislate that Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve become public holidays after 6 p.m. ( Notice given 25 November 2010. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

18   Mr Morrison: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) the floods in Queensland, Victoria, NSW and Tasmania have devastated critical infrastructure, including roads, railway, housing, schools and service infrastructure;

(b) the cost of re-building this critical infrastructure will be many billions of dollars;

(c) the Australian labour market is currently experiencing critical shortages in a number of skilled occupations;

(d) demand for workers in these occupations will increase substantially in order to rebuild critical infrastructure across the country;

(e) almost one million people are currently in Australia on a variety of temporary visas;

(f) more than 400 000 people are in Australia on student visas;

(g) there is a backlog of more than 140 000 applications in the skilled migration program;

(h) the current Government has been unable to process in a timely way, offshore visa applications across a range of categories, especially in the skilled categories; and

(i) current processing times for sub-class 457 Business (Long Stay) Visas is between 3 to 12 months; and

(2) calls for the Government to:

(a) introduce, for a prescribed period of time, a regulation which allows the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship t o waive all visa conditions which would otherwise prevent the holder of a temporary visa resident in Australia from making an onshore application to undertake paid work, where the:

(i) Minister has declared a state of emergency for the purpose of the oper ation of these provisions;

(ii) applicant has the support of a relevant employer or is sponsored by a State government; and

(iii) applicant is seeking employment in an occupation nominated on the Skilled Occupation Lists or any other such occupation nominated for the purpose of these provisions by the Minister; and

(b) re-instate all pre-existing visa conditions at the end of the specified period. ( Notice given 9 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

19   Ms Smyth: To move—That this House:

(1)  acknowledges the significant incidence of autism spectrum disorder in our community;

(2)  seeks to ensure that those affected by autism spectrum disorder are aware of the educational and other opportunities including early intervention strategies available which encourage them to achieve their best;

(3) notes the Government's early intervention program, Helping Children with Autism, which has provided over 10 000 children under seven years of age with access to early intervention support services;

(4) encourages the Government to maintain its dialogue with:

(a)  medical, educational and other autism professionals to hear their views on the most effective methods of support for people with autism; and

(b) those affected by autism spectrum disorder, their families and carers to achieve better educational and health outcomes; and

(5)  calls on the Victorian Government to give a firm guarantee that stage 2 of the Eastern Autistic School will proceed and that it will not back away from such an important school rebuilding program. ( Notice given 23 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

20   Ms Saffin: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) o n 16 November 2009 the Government and the Parliament made an apology to the estimated 500 000 Forgotten Australians, who experienced neglect and cruelty in institutional and out of home care last century that left many physically and psychologically scarred;

(b) the Australian Government has made available $26.5 million for a national Find and Connect service to help Forgotten Australians locate their personal records and connect with family members;

(c) the Find and Connect service is currently being implemented and includes web links, a 1800 number, a network of case managers and new counselling support services;

(d) the Australian Government has amended the Allocated Amendment Principles 2009 (No. 2) of the Aged Care Act 1997 to recognise care leavers as a special needs group, in line with undertakings made in the apology to the Forgotten Australians;

(e) while some States and T erritories have taken actions to compensate the Forgotten Australians, these are uneven and insufficient; and

(f) there are obligations to be met by churches to contribute to redress schemes;

(2) a cknowledges the Forgotten Australians' call for an equivalent to the Gold Card to provide entitlements for health care, education and transport to go some way towards compensating for the neglect of their education and health care as children; and

(3) considers how the Government can work with States and Territories to come up with a plan to implement such a card. ( Notice given 23 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

21   Mr Georganas: To move—That this House:

(1) a cknowledges that:

(a)  International Mother Language Day was celebrated on 21 February 2011 with the aim of promoting linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism;

(b) International Mother Language Day was proclaimed by the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organisation in 1999 and has been observed every year since February 2000; and

(c) the date of the event represents the day in 1952 when students demonstrating for recognition of their language, Bangla, in what was then Pakistan, were shot and killed by police in Dhaka, now the capital of Bangladesh;

(2) notes that:

(a)  more than 400 languages are spoken in Australia including 45 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island languages;

(b) more than five million Australians speak a second language and more than three million Australians speak a second language at home;

(c) the top five languages other than English spoken in Australia are Italian, Greek, Cantonese, Arabic and Mandarin; and

(d) over 50 000 people speak an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Island language;

(3) recognises that:

(a)  in a globalised economy, language skills are a key workforce advantage;

(b) language skills will play an increasingly important role in securing Australia's future success on the world stage; and

(c) linguistic and cultural diversity enrich the social fabric of the Australian community;

(4) supports:

(a) initiatives which encourage Australi ans to undertake language education, whatever their age;

(b) the continuation of high quality language education in the Australian education system at every level;

(c) language teachers in their role as educators and thanks them for their contribution to enhancing Australia's foreign language capacity; and

(d) the development of a specific foreign languages component in the new National School Curriculum. ( Notice given 23 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

22   Mr Champion: To move—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) t he positive impact compulsory and voluntary income management is having on the wellbeing of families and children in Perth and the Kimberley in Western Australia;

(b) an independent evaluation of compulsory and voluntary income management in Western Australia showed that participants believed it had made a positive impact on their lives;

(c) that a non discriminatory income management system linked to the child protection system and school attendance has been rolled out in the Northern Territory to help children who are being neglected or are at risk of neglect;

(d) that more than 1700 people have moved off income management across the Northern Territory because they have found jobs and apprenticeships or improved their parenting skills; and

(e) that income management produces positive life impacts for individuals acquiring new skills through training and getting jobs; and

(2) c alls for this initiative to be trialled in other communities to help those families and individuals receiving welfare payments who are:

(a) iden tified as high risk by Centrelink social workers;

(b) recommended by child protection workers; and

(c) or who volunteer to participate to improve their ability to manage and save money and provide the essentials of life for their children. ( Notice given 24 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

23   Ms Bird: To move—That this House:

(1)  notes that the Illawarra Ethnic Communities Council (IECC) celebrates its thirty-fifth anniversary in 2011;

(2) congratulates the Chairman, Mr Ken Habak for his many years of leadership of the IECC, and past and present members of the IECC for their service;

(3) acknowledges the extensive community services provided by the IECC to the Illawarra migrant community over the last 35 years;

(4) commends the Federal Government's multicultural policy; and

(5) recognises that the Illawarra community is made up of diverse cultures, and lives in harmony with understanding and tolerance. ( Notice given 24 February 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

24   Mr Danby: To move—That this House:

(1) c ongratulates the courageous people of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Bahrain and other Middle Eastern countries who have demanded the resignation of long-ruling authoritarian governments and the holding of free elections in their countries;

(2) welcomes the decisions of Presidents Ben Ali of Tunisia and Mubarak of Egypt to resign rather than plunge their countries into further bloodshed by clinging on to power;

(3) condemns the tyrannical regime of Colonel Muammar Al-Qaddafi for using deadly force against the people of Libya, and calls on him to resign and leave the country rather than cause further bloodshed;

(4) calls on all Middle Eastern governments, including Iran, to allow peaceful transitions to democratic government, cease using force against peaceful demonstrators and respect human rights, including the rights of women and of all religious minorities;

(5) calls on the United Nations Human Rights Council to suspend Libya from membership as long as Colonel Al-Qaddafi is in power, and to take a firm stand in support of democratic freedom and human rights in all countries of the Middle East;

(6) calls on all Western governments to assist the people of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and other Middle Eastern countries by all means available to safeguard their new freedoms, to establish stable governments and to hold free elections; and

(7) asserts that the best way to defeat anti-democratic forces such as extremist Islamism in the countries of the Middle East is for the West to show by word and deed that it supports the people of these countries in their aspirations for freedom and democracy, and to assist them in establishing stable, democratic, secular governments that uphold human rights and live in peace with their neighbours. ( Notice given 1 March 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

25   Ms Owens: To move—That this House:

(1) recognises:

(a)  the important contribution of the Burmese community in Australia;

(b) the strength of the Burmese community and professional organisations and the part they have played in assisting others to settle successfully in Australia; and

(c) the extensive charity work of the Burmese community in Australia for the broader Australian community; and

(2)  acknowledges the Burmese community’s:

(a) strong advocacy over the plight of the Burmese refugees in the region; and

(b) determination to raise awareness of the difficult situation facing internall y displaced people in Eastern Burma. ( Notice given 1 March 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

26   Mr Bandt: To move—That standing orders 1, 47, 78 and 91 be amended, as follows:

(1)  Maximum speaking times

After ‘Suspension of standing or other orders without notice’, add ‘, if not moved during Question Time’;

(47)  Motions for suspension of orders

After paragraph (d), add:

‘(e) If a suspension motion is moved during Question Time, the question must be put immediately and decided without amendment or debate.’

(78)  Matters not open to debate

After paragraph (m), add:

‘(n) motions for suspension of orders, if the motion is moved during Question Time (standing order 47).

(97)  Daily Question Time

After paragraph (b), add:

‘(c) A Minister may not ask that further questions be placed on the Notice Paper until twenty questions have been asked and answered, or until 3.30 pm, whichever is earlier.’ ( Notice given 22 March 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

27   Mr L. D. T. Ferguson: To move—That this House notes the:

(1) continuing discrimination and attacks upon Mandeans on the basis of their religious beliefs;

(2) minimal opportunities for internal relocation of Mandeans within Iraq due to their limited numbers and lack of Government protection;

(3) significant numbers that have fled the country either to other nations in the Middle East and from there to nations such as Australia;

(4) need for Australia to continue to focus on Mandean claims in our refugee/humanitarian intake; and

(5) humanitarian imperative for Australia to raise continuing human rights abuses in Iraq within varied multicultural fora and bilateral dealings with Iraq. ( Notice given 10 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

28   Mr Georganas: To move—That this House:

(1) acknowledges the:

(a) occasion of the State Visit to Australia by the President of the Republic of Cyprus, His Excellency Mr Demetris Christofias;

(b)  strong and enduring bilateral relationship between the Republic of Cyprus and the Commonwealth of Australia; and

(c) characterisation of the relationship by friendship and cooperation, underpinned by people to people links; and

(2) commends the:

(a)  continuing efforts by President Christofias towards the reunification of Cyprus; and

(b) progress made so far in the fully fledged negotiations, and the prospect of further progress in the near future towards a comprehensive, durable and just settlement that safeguards the rights, interests and welfare of all Cypriots. ( Notice given 10 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

29   Mr Bandt: To move—That this House supports the aspirations and rights of each of the Palestinian and the Israeli peoples to independent states, living in peace and security. ( Notice given 11 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

30   Dr Stone: To move—That this House:

(1)  notes that:

(a)  Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of physical, mental, behavioural, learning and development disorders that can result from foetal exposure to alcohol; and

(b) FASD is reported to be the greatest cause on non-congenital, irreversible and permanent brain damage to new-borns in Australia; and

(2)  calls upon the Australian:

(a)  Parliament to continue to facilitate and support the development of a FASD national diagnostic tool for the use of medical professionals and other health service providers; and

(b) Government to:

(i)  give FASD the status of a recognised disability in Australia;

(ii) regulate to require appropriate warnings about the risks of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on alcohol product labelling sold in Australia;

(iii) institute a national awareness campaign to raise community awareness of the risks to the unborn child when alcohol is consumed in pregnancy and highlight the potential cognitive and developmental consequences for affected individuals as these pertain to service providers, law enforcement  and justice, the community sector and education; and

(iv) give support to the development of models of care and helping strategies for families and individuals dealing with the impacts of FASD. ( Notice given 12 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

31   Dr Leigh: To move—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) 23 June is the United Nations' Public Service Day;

(b) democracy and successful governance are built on the f oundation of a competent, career-based public service; and

(c) the day recognises the key values of teamwork, innovation and responsiveness to the public; and

(2) commends the Australian Public Service on continuing to be an international model of best-p ractice public service and providing outstanding services to the Australian community. ( Notice given 30 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

32   Ms Rishworth: To move—That this House:

(1) notes the devastating impact of tobacco products on the lives of Australians, with smoking causing numerous life-threatening diseases including cardio vascular disease, lung cancer, stomach cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, leukaemia and oral cancers, and that the majority of smokers regret the decision to ever start;

(2) acknowledges that there is significant evidence to suggest that creative design, branding and promotion of tobacco through its packaging:

(a) reduces the impact of graphic health warnings;

(b) increases the attractiveness and appeal of tobacco products for adolescents; and

(c) misleads consumers to believe tha t some tobacco products are less harmful than others;

(3) recognises that this Government is already implementing a suite of reforms aimed at reducing smoking and its harmful effects; and

(4) supports the significant measures proposed by this Government including the measure to mandate plain packaging of tobacco products from 1 July 2012. ( Notice given 30 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

33   Ms Brodtmann: To move—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Australia had a record year in 2010 with 309 multiple organ donors;

(b)  activity in 2011 shows that Australia is on track to steadily sustain this improvement with 112 donors already this year;

(c) following the injection of $151 million by the Government to establish a coordinated approach to organ donation, 242 staff have now been appointed in 77 hospitals and DonateLife agencies across Australia, thus enabling all jurisdictions to work cooperatively to support sustained improvements in organ donation;

(d) there were 931 transplants in 2010 and already there have been 327 transplants in 2011; and

(e) States and Territories are committed to supporting this reform agenda; and

(2) acknowledges:

(a) the selfless act of all donor families who have supported new life for transplant recipients;

(b) the introduction of a national protocol for donation after cardiac death that will ensure Australia maximises the number of organ donors;

(c) that many hospitals that have not previously donated organs and tissue are now undertaking this important role as a result of the extra funding and staffing that are available;

(d) that the States and Territories reaffirmed their commitment to the reform agenda in February 2011, in particular the financing of increases in tissue typing, retrieval of organs and transplant surgery;

(e) the success of the two advertising campaigns launched in May 2010 and February 2011; and

(f) the importance of continued input of community groups and non government organisations in raising awareness among the Australian community. ( Notice given 30 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

34   Mr Wilkie: To present a Bill for an Act to restrict the export of live animals for slaughter pending its prohibition, and for related purposes ( Live Animal Export Restriction and Prohibition Bill 2011 ). ( Notice given 31 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

35   Mr Bandt: To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Export Control Act 1982 to prohibit the export of live animals for slaughter, and for related purposes ( Live Animal Export (Slaughter) Prohibition Bill 2011 ). ( Notice given 31 May 2011. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

Orders of the day

1   food labelling: Resumption of debate ( from 18 October 2010—Mr Adams , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That this House:

(1) notes significant community concern regarding the clarity, simplicity and accuracy of food labelling, including labelling identifying the:

(a) origin of the food;

(b) nutritional value of the food; and

(c) food production methods used, i ncluding the use of food technologies;

(2) recognises that:

(a) adequate food labelling laws should aim foremost to protect the health and safety of consumers and eliminate deceitful or misleading labelling information;

(b) having clear, simple and accu rate labelling on food empowers consumers and enables them to make informed food choices; and

(c) for food labelling laws to be effective, they need to be rigorously and consistently enforced;

(3) supports the Australian and New Zealand Food Regulation M inisterial Council’s establishment of an independent review into food labelling; and

(4) encourages the Government and State and Territory governments to examine the results of this review, and work together to ensure that our food labelling laws deliver the outcomes our community desires. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 20 June 2011. )

2   gene patents: Resumption of debate ( from 18 October 2010 ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 6 September 2010 the ABC’s Four Corners program screened a story entitled ‘Body Corporate’, highlighting growing community and scientific concern regarding gene patents;

(b) in particular, Four Corners discussed the case of five year old Liam who needed to have a genetic test to see if he had gene mutations to the SCN1A human gene linked to a specific form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome;

(c) Bionomics, a South Australian company which had received a specific grant of around $1 000 000 from AusIndustry to develop a SCN1A gene test:

(i) took out an Australian patent over the SCN1A human gene; and

(ii) subsequently exclusively licensed the pate nt to Genetic Technologies, a Melbourne company that charges $2000 for the SCN1A gene test in Australia;

(d) Liam was being treated at the Westmead Hospital—a publicly funded institution that is part of NSW Health—which could not afford to pay Genetic Technologies $2000 for each SCN1A gene test;

(e) Liam’s doctors sent a sample of his DNA to be tested in Scotland where the charge was just one third of the price charged by Genetic Technologies; and

(f) the option to send the DNA sample overseas for testing not only took more time, leaving the young boy and his family waiting in distress, but highlights how Australian taxpayers providing research funds to (i) Australian universities to identify the SCN1A genetic mutations; and (ii) an Australian company to develop a genetic test, have been deprived of the benefits of that very research;

(2) notes that:

(a) in July 2008, Genetic Technologies , as the exclusive licensee of Myriad Genetics, a United States company granted Australian patents over the BRCA 1 and 2 gene mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancers, demanded via a lawyer’s letter sent to all Australian hospitals and clinical laboratories (including the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre) that they stop all testing for breast cancer, claiming such testing infringed Myriad Genetics’ Australian BRCA patents;

(b) in 2009 in the United States, eleven plaintiffs, including Lisbeth Ceriani, a 43 year old single mother diagnosed with breast cancer, and professional medical and clinical associations such as the American Society for Clinical Pathology, launched a legal challenge to seven of Myriad Genetics’ United States BRCA patents, where: and

(i) Ms Ceriani found that she was unable to get a second opinion on a positive genetic test for ovarian cancer because in the United States there is only one test, owned by only one company, Myriad Genetics, which charges over US$3000 per test;

(ii) in March 2010 a United States Federal Court agreed with the plaintiffs and declared all seven United States patents invalid on the ground that under United States patent law, patents can only be granted over inventions, not for the discovery of natural phenomena; and

(iii) the Court so held because, first, despite being removed from the human body and thus ‘isolated’, the BRCA genes were ‘not markedly different from native DNA as it exists in nature’ and second, the analysis of these two human genes by way of a genetic test was ‘merely data-gathering to obtain clinical data’;

(3) notes that:

(a) a t the official commemoration of the decoding of the human genome in March 2000, United States President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair said that ‘raw fundamental data on the human genome, including the human DNA sequence and its variations, should be made freely available to scientists everywhere’, yet by 2005, according to a survey published in Science , more than 20 per cent (probably now much higher) of the human genome was the subject of United States intellectual property;

(b) President Clinton and Prime Minister Blair also said that ‘unencumbered access to this information will promote discoveries that will reduce the burden of disease, improve health around the world, and enhance the quality of life of all humankind.’;

(c) unencumbered access to genetic information cannot be achieved when patents over human genes are being used to suppress competition, innovation, research and testing;

(d) Professor Ian Frazer, the inventor of the cervical cancer vaccine, has joined other cancer researchers in calling for a revision of Australian patent law, stating that researchers need to be able to proceed with their work without having to consult the companies whose patents the work might infringe: ‘restricting the research use of a gene sequence could delay the development and testing of truly inventive and practical uses of the gene and its protein product for diagnosis and therapy.’; and

(e) other groups opposed to the granting of gene patents include the Cancer Council Australia, the Breast Cancer Foundation of Australia, the Royal Australian College of Pathologists, the Human Genetics Society of Australia and the Australian Medical Association; and

( 4) calls for amendment of the Patents Act 1990 to ensure that patents cannot be granted over any biological materials which are identical or substantially identical to what exists in nature. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 20 June 2011. )

3   pink ribbon day: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010—Mrs Moylan , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Hall—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Pink Ribbon Day is 25 October;

(b) breast cancer is the most common cancer in Australian women, accounting for 28 per cent of cancer diagnoses in 2006;

(c) this year alone, 12 000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, which is expected to increase by 22 per cent by 2015;

(d) one in nine women will be diagnosed with breast cancer by age 85;

(e) breast cancer is the most common cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women;

(f) the risk of developing breast cancer increases with age, with the average age of diagnosis recorded as 60 in 2006;

(g) mammograms are vital to early detection, with 75 per cent of deaths occurring in women who have never been screened; and

(h) there has been a 27 per cent decrease in mortality rates due to breast cancer since 1994; and

(2) acknowledges the:

(a) work of the National Breast Cancer Foundation;

(b) effectiveness of Pink Ribbon Day in raising awareness;

(c) work of the Jane McGrath Foundation;

(d) contribution of v olunteers, staff and researchers; and

(e) importance of early detection. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

4   united nations day: Resumption of debate ( from 25 October 2010—Mr Forrest , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That this House:

(1) notes that 24 October is United Nations Day which celebrates the entry into force of the United Nations Charter on 24 October 1945;

(2) celebrates Australia’s key role in the formation of the United Nations and the drafting of the United Nations Charter;

(3) recognises that Australia has been a consistent and long term contributor to United Nations efforts to safeguard international peace and security and to promote human rights, for example, by:

(a)  being the thirteenth largest contributor to the United Nations budget;

(b) contributing to many United Nations peacekeeping operations;

(c) firmly committing to increasing Australia’s development assistance; and

(d) by continuing to push for real progress towards the Millennium Development Goals;

(4) notes further the Australian Government’s commitment to the multilateral system as one of the three funda mental pillars of Australia’s foreign policy, namely that Australia is determined to work through the United Nations to enhance security and economic well being worldwide, and to uphold the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter;

(5) notes that as the only genuinely global Organisation, the United Nations plays a critical role in addressing the global challenges that no single country can resolve on its own, and that Australia is determined to play its part within the United Nations to help address serious global challenges, including conflict prevention and resolution, international development, climate change, terrorism and the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction;

(6) expresses its condolences for the loss of 100 United Nations staff lives in January 2010 as a result of the earthquake in Haiti, and expresses its appreciation for the ongoing work in difficult conditions of United Nations staff around the world; and

(7) reaffirms the faith of the Australian people in the purposes, principles, and actions of the United Nations acting under guidance of the United Nations Charter. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 20 June 2011. )

5   Wild Rivers (Environmental Management) Bill 2010 ( Mr Abbott ) : Second reading ( from 15 November 2010 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On 17 November 2010, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on Economics, and the Committee reported on 12 May 2011. )

6   Defence Amendment (Parliamentary Approval of Overseas Service) Bill 2010 ( Mr Bandt ) : Second reading ( from 15 November 2010 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

7   world diabetes day: Speech by mover` ( from 15 November 2010—Mr Georganas , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a)  14 November 2010 is United Nations World Diabetes Day, with this year's theme being diabetes education and prevention;

(b) the symbol for World Diabetes Day is a blue ring which symbolises:

(i)  life;

(ii) health;

(iii) the sky that connects all nations; and

(iv) the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes pandemic; and

(c) d iabetes is Australia's fastest growing chronic disease with up to 3.3 million people estimated to have diabetes or pre-diabetes, and one person in Australia diagnosed every seven minutes;

(2) recognises that:

(a) d iabetes is a complex and chronic disease which affects the entire body and often lasts a lifetime;

(b) Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes accounting for 85 to 90 per cent of all cases and costs the economy up to $3 billion dollars every year;

(c) a person with Type 2 Diabetes and no complications costs the community $9625 a year and a person with Type 2 Diabetes who has complications costs the community $15 850 per year; and

(d) there is currently no cure for diabetes, but up to 60 per cent of cases of Type 2 Diabetes are preventable; and

(3) supports:

(a) d iabetes awareness and education campaigns;

(b) healthy lifestyles and other preventative measures; and

(c) research for a cure. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

8   Competition and Consumer (Price Signalling) Amendment Bill 2010 ( Mr Billson ) : Second reading ( from 22 November 2010 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On 24 November 2010, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on Economics. )

9   nobel peace prize for mr liu: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Danby—That this House:

(1) congratulates Mr Liu Xiaobo for having been awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize;

(2) notes that:

(a) Mr Liu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for ‘his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China’;

(b) on 23 December 2009 Mr Liu was tried for ‘inciting subversion of state power’, and on 25 December 2009 sentenced to eleven years' imprisonment and two years' deprivation of political rights;

(c) Mr Liu was tried in the context of his advocacy for the petition known as ‘Charter 08’ which was initially signed by 350 Chinese intellectuals and human rights activists; and

(d) ‘Charter 08’ calls for 19 changes to improve human rights in China, including an independent legal system, freedom of association and the elimination of one-party rule;

(3) calls for Mr Liu to be released and his sentence repealed; and

(4) supports the right of Chinese citizens to call for political reform, greater protection of human rights and democratisation in their country. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

10   Banking Amendment (Delivering Essential Financial Services) Bill 2010 ( Mr Bandt ) : Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

11   sale of the australian securities exchange: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2010 ) on the motion of Mr Katter—That this House:

(1) resolves that it will oppose any sale of the Australian Securities Exchange that would provide majority foreign ownership; and

(2) notes that such a sale would not merely involve the ASX as an asset, but may hand over to a foreign corporation the regulatory function inherent in a stock exchange. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

12   Patent Amendment (Human Genes and Biological Materials) Bill 2010 ( Mr Dutton ) : Second reading ( from 21 February 2011 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

13   NATIONAL BROADBAND DEVELOPMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Rowland—That this House:

(1) notes the:

(a) 19 Septemb er 2010 Declaration by the members of the Broadband Commission for Digital Development to world leaders attending the 2010 Millennium Development Goals Summit at the United Nations on the benefits of broadband as the transformational technology for employment generation, productivity growth and the long term economic competitiveness;

(b) OECD report of December 2009 which makes the case for investment in a competitive, open-access national fibre network rollout based on benefits to four key sectors of the economy: electricity, health, transportation and education;

(c) the positive externalities of broadband in providing increased opportunities to access Australian health and education services, and the linkages between disparities in broadband access and social disadvantage; and

(d) the technical limitations of non-fibre approaches to national broadband development, particularly in respect of video and other ‘real time’ applications used to deliver health and education services; and

(2) recognises the mer its of the development of universal broadband access in Australia with an emphasis on options for niche broadband delivered content and applications to provide immediate benefits to areas and groups of identifiable need. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

14   OLDER AUSTRALIANS: Resumption of debate ( from 21 February 2011 ) on the motion of Ms Hall—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) Australia has an ageing population;

(b) age discrimination exists within Australia and that this discrimination impacts on the strength of society, economy and the lives of older Australians;

(c) ageing should not only be considered as an economic and social cost to government, rather, the positives of an older population should be recognised and promoted by government;

(d) all older Australians deserve to live with dignity; and

(e) the knowledge, life experience and skills of older people provide enormous benefit to Australia and the social fabric of the nation;

(2) acknowledges that:

(a) older workers have the ability to make an enormous contribution to the economic pro sperity of Australia;

(b) most volunteer work is undertaken by older Australians and provides an enormous economic social contribution to Australia; and

(c) older Australians provide an enormous amount of child care which provides economic value to the nation; and

(3) calls on the Government to consider:

(a) new and innovative approaches to engage older Australians and address their needs;

(b) encouraging Government departments to introduce senior friendly practices, such as dedicated seniors phone lin es and customer service officers;

(c) Aged Care Accounts for all workers to fund their needs as they become older; and

(d) highlighting and promoting the advantage of employing older workers. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

15   Evidence-based policy making: Resumption of debate ( from 28 February 2011 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh—That this House:

(1) reaffirms this Government’s commitment to evidence-based policy making;

(2) notes that:

(a) the Productivity Commission has highlighted the importance of rigorous evaluation in assessing the impact of soc ial, educational, employment and economic programs; and

(b) randomised policy trials are increasingly being used as an evaluation tool in developed and developing nations; and

(3) supports measures to increase the quality of evaluations, and calls on the Government to consider whether randomised policy trials may be implemented to evaluate future Government policies. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

16   Auditor-General Amendment Bill 2011 ( Mr Oakeshott ) : Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

17   Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Abolition of Alpine Grazing) Bill 2011 ( Mr Bandt ) : Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2011 ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

18   Abolition of Age Limit on Payment of the Superannuation Guarantee Charge Bill 2011 ( Mrs B. K. Bishop ) : Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from 26 May 2011—Mr Pyne ) ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 24 March 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

19   fiscal strategy: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr S. P. Jones—That this House:

(1) n otes that as the world emerges from the Global Financial Crisis:

(a) i n Australia unemployment of five per cent is low by international standards; and

(b) the Australian Government’s Debt to GDP ratio is lower and its fiscal consolidation faster, than in most comparable countries; and

(2) a grees that the Gillard Government's fiscal strategy to assist business and communities to recover from this crisis while managing inflation and removing the structural deficits from the Federal Budget is the right course of action for Australia's long term economic prosperity. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

20   early onset dementia: Resumption of debate ( from 23 May 2011—Mrs K. L. Andrews , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth—That this House:

(1) r ecognises the devastating impact of early onset dementia on the lives of sufferers and their families;

(2) notes that:

(a) individuals who suffer fr om early onset dementia often face unique challenges including obtaining an accurate and early diagnosis and finding appropriate accommodation and care facilities; and

(b) early onset dementia sufferers are generally still physically active, engaged in paid employment and many still have significant family responsibilities at the time of their diagnosis;

(3) a cknowledges that these characteristics often mean that sufferers of early onset dementia require support services tailored to their unique circumstances including:

(a) accommodation with appropriate support and activities specifically for their age;

(b) support for family members to understand and cope with the impact of the disease especially for young dependent children; and

(c) support for the i ndividual and their families in managing their reduced capacity to work and inability to fulfil family responsibilities, such as parenting, as a result of the disease; and

(4) calls on all levels of government to work together to appropriately support tho se suffering from early onset dementia and their families. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

21   Malaysia asylum seeker proposal: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011 ) on the motion of Mr Bandt—That this House:

(1) condemns the Gillard Government’s deal with Malaysia that would see 800 asylum seekers intercepted in Australian waters and sent to Malaysia; and

(2) calls on the Government to immediately abandon this proposal. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 2 June 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

22   Political donations from tobacco companies: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011—Mr Simpkins , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Neumann—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) there are about three  million Australians who still smoke; and

(b) tobacco is a lethal product, killing around 15 000 Australians every year; and

(2) calls on all M embers and political parties to immediately stop accepting political donations from tobacco companies. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

23   Criteria for independent youth allowance: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011—Ms Brodtmann , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Pyne—That this House:

(1)  notes that the Government has:

(a) admitted there is a problem with the criteria for independent youth allowance for inner regional students;

(b) committed to bringing forward its review of the matter with the broad purpose of finding a permanent solution to address the disadvantages that currently exist for rural and regional students in qualifying for financial assistance; and

(c) indicated it will remove the difference between the inner regional areas and the other regional zones for the eligibility criteria f or independent youth allowance; and

(2)  calls on the Government to bring forward its timetable for resolving the matter, and in particular ensure that:

(a) the review is completed and funds to pay for the measure are secured by l July 2011;

(b) the curr ent eligibility criteria for independent youth allowance for persons whose homes are located in Outer Regional Australia, Remote Australia, and Very Remote Australia according to the Remoteness Structure defined in subsection 1067A(10F) of the Social Security Act 1991 also apply to those with homes in Inner Regional Australia from 1 July 2011; and

(c) all students who had a gap year in 2010 (ie, 2009 Year 12 school leavers) and who meet the relevant criteria qualify for the payment. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. On Thursday 2 June 2011, the Selection Committee recommended that this order of the day be voted on. )

24   Condemnation of the death penalty: Resumption of debate ( from 30 May 2011—Mr L. D. T. Ferguson , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Melham—That this House:

(1) notes the release on 28 Mar ch 2011 of an Amnesty International report entitled Death Sentences and Executions 2010 and that:

(a) over the last 10  years, 31 countries have abolished the death sentence in practice or in law; and

(b) in December 2010:

(i) the United Nations General Assembly adopted its third resolution on a moratorium on the use of the death penalty; and

(ii) 23 countries had carried out executions in 2010 compared to 19 countries in 2009; and

(2)  recommits to its bi-partisan condemnation of the death penalty across the world. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 20 June 2011. )

 
 
 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 a.m. to 12 noon and from 8 to 9.30 p.m.; and in the Main Committee from approx. 11 a.m. to approx. 1.30 p.m. and from approx. 6.30 to 9 p.m. (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).