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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS continued

Notices given for Monday, 27 March 2006

*1   Ms King: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise that:

(a) across all conflicts, from the Boer War to the Korean War, some 35,000 Australians were held as Prisoners of War (POW);

(b) PoWs suffered unimaginable trauma with 8000 dying in captivity;

(c) many PoWs are now in their 80's and that due recognition needs to be urgently given to their experiences; and

(d) Australian Ex-PoWs have worked to compile the list of Australians held as prisoners during wartime and that their names now appear on a memorial in Ballarat; and

(2) acknowledge that for Australian PoWs the memorial in Ballarat has national s ignificance. ( Notice given 2 March 2006. )

*2   Mr Melham: To move—That this House:

(1) note:

(a) the recent report by independent experts for the United Nations Human Rights Commission that calls for the immediate closure of the United States military’s Guantanamo Bay detention centre;

(b) that United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, has strongly supported the call for the immediate closure of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility;

(c) that the United Nations investigators held that view that the legal regime applied to the persons detained at Guantanamo Bay seriously undermines the rule of law and a number of fundamental universally recognised human rights;

(d) that numerous eminent international and Australian lawyers, including former High Court judge Mary Gaudron, have expressed the view that the United States Military Commission process applied to Guantanamo Bay detainees is fundamentally flawed and contrary to the rule of law and the right to a fair trail; and

(e) that an Australian citizen, Mr David Hicks, has now been detained at Guantanamo Bay without trial for more than four years; and

(2) call on the Australian Government to:

(a)  repudiate its support for M r Hicks’ detention and prospective trial by a United States Military Commission;

(b) take all necessary measures to ensure that Mr Hicks is dealt with according to international recognised standards of justice, most importantly the right to a fair trial; and

(c) support the United Nations Secretary- General’s call for the immediate closure of the Guantanamo Bay detention centre. ( Notice given 2 March 2006. )

Notices continued

1   Mr Price: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise the important contribution Australia’s growing Hindu community has made to the national fabric over the course of the last twenty five years;

(2) note the launch of Prashant Jyoti, Australia’s first English-Hindi publication at the Rooty Hill School of Arts on Friday, 19 August 2005;

(3) acknowledge the role the magazine will play in teaching non-Hindi speaking Australians about Hinduism as a religion and a culture; and

(4) congratulate Brahman Purohit Sabha of Australia and Shri Sanatan Dharam Pratinidhi Sabha of NSW for backing the initiative as part of their wider efforts to foster strong and harmonious links between the Hindu community and other Australians. ( Notice given 5 September 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 27 March 2006. )

2   Mr M. J. Ferguson: To move—That this House:

(1) acknowledge the 60 th Anniversary of the end of World War II and that since World War II Japan has profoundly transformed itself through its commitment to world peace;

(2) reaffirm that at an international level Japan is a friend of Australia, committed to peace in our region and an active supporter of the United Nations contributing one fifth of the United Nations budget; and

(3) recognise that next year, the official 2006 Australia-Japan Year of Exchange, presents both countries with a wonderful opportunity to reinforce their friendship and partnership on the political, security, economic, social, cultural, environmental and development fronts. ( Notice given 7 September 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 27 March 2006. )

3   Mr Price: To move—That this House:

(1) note the alarming and rapid increase in fuel prices in Western Sydney and across Australia;

(2) recognise the severe impli cations of exorbitant fuel prices for local businesses and family budgets;

(3) acknowledge residents’ concerns about reported instances of possible price gouging practices within the petroleum refining and distribution industry; and

(4) ask the Treasurer to direct the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to formally monitor prices under Part VIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974 . ( Notice given 10 October 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

4   Ms Livermore: To move—That this House:

(1) acknowledge that the Federal Government formally recognised Australian South Sea Islanders as a distinct cultural group in 1994 and that this was followed by the Queensland Government in 2000;

(2) recognise that Australian South Sea Islanders, as a group, experience disadvantage compared to the general Australian population;

(3) note with disappointment that many of the practical measures to overcome this disadvantage recommended by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission in its report The Call for Recognition: A Report on the Situation of Australian South Sea Islanders have not been implemented despite their endorsement by the Federal Government in 1994; and

(4) call on the Federal Government to go beyond the symbolism of formal recognition of Australian South Sea Islanders by expanding current policies and enacting appropriate measures designed to deliver real assistance to this group. ( Notice given 13 October 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

5   Mr Rudd: To move—That this House:

(1) condemn unequivocally the statements of the President of Iran calling for the destruction of Israel;

(2) welcome the stated position of the United Nations Security Council admonishing th e Iranian President’s statements and reminding all UN members to “refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state”;

(3) reaffirm its support for a two-state solution to the Israel/Palestine question; and

(4) call on all nations in the Middle East, not just Israel and Palestine, to engage in the Road Map to Peace. ( Notice given 31 October 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

6   Mr Windsor: To move—That this House, while acknowledging that progress has been made in improving access to veterans’ entitlements:

(1) note that anomalies remain in respec t of eligibility for Gold Card benefits; and

(2) call on the Government to introduce legislation as a matter of urgency to address remaining anomalies, and, in particular, to cover the extension of eligibility for Gold Card benefits to service personnel who were enlisted in the Australian defence forces during World War 2, but, while willing to serve overseas were either kept at home to perform their service in Australia, or, although selected for service overseas, because of injury or other misadventure, were not in fact sent to serve overseas. ( Notice given 31 October 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

7   Ms King: To move—That this House:

(1) acknowledge that the drug Herceptin is accepted to be effective in the treatment of breast cancer;

(2) note that:

(a) early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer reduces complications and the chance of developing recurring tumors;

(b) Australian women suffering from breast cancer (FISH confirmed CERB2+) are entitled to access effective medications during early stages of the disease; and

(c) the cost of Herceptin at $60,000 plus per annum puts this treatment beyond the reach of most women and their families; and

(3) call on the Government to facilitate a expedited PBAC process for the listing of Herceptin. ( Notice given 31 October 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

8   Ms King: To move—That this House:

(1) acknowledge the important contribution made by the manufacturing secto r to rural economies specifically and the Australian economy generally;

(2) note that:

(a) the October Australian Industry Group - Pricewaterhouse Coopers Australian Performance of Manufacturing Index shows the third decline of manufacturing activity in Australia in four months;

(b) the Australian automobile component parts manufacturing sector is under threat from cheap imports produced in countries with low wage levels and poor or nonexistent occupational health and safety safeguards; and

(c) necessary research and design support to encourage the development of new processes and products is not available to manufacturers; and

(3)  call on the Government to:

(a) appoint a Minister with specific responsibility for manufacturing; and

(b) develop a plan to secure Australia’s manufacturing future including investment in research and development, skills training and infrastructure. ( Notice given 3 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

9   Mr Beazley: To move—That this House:

(1) note that the Howard Government has now spent over $50 million on a party political advertising campaign i n an attempt to sell its extreme industrial relations changes;

(2) note that the Howard Government intends to guillotine its extreme industrial relations legislation through the House of Representatives to limit debate on the 600 page bill and 600 page Explanatory Memorandum;

(3) note that the Howard Government intends to set up a sham Senate inquiry into its extreme industrial relations legislation to further limit public scrutiny of the bill and its adverse impact on Australian workers and their families; and

(4) call on the Prime Minister to agree to a televised national debate with the Leader of the Opposition to ensure the Australian community has a full appreciation of the adverse impact these draconian laws will have on their working lives. ( Notice given 7 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

10   Mr Price: To move—That the standing orders be amended by amending standing order 80 to read as follows:

80 Closure of Member

A motion may be made that a Member who is speaking, except a Member giving a notice of motion or formally moving the terms of a motion allowed under the standing orders or speaking to a motion of dissent (from any ruling of the Speaker under standing order 100), “be no longer heard”, and such question shall be put forthwith and decided without amendment or debate. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

11   Mr Price: To move—That the standing orders be amended by inserting the following standing order after standing order 99:

99A Questions to committee chairs

A Question may be put to a Member in his or her capacity as Chair of a committee of the House, or of a joint committee, in connection with the work or duties of the committee in question. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

12   Mr Price: To move—That the following amendment to the Standing Orders be adopted for the remainder of this session:

102B Lodging questions in writing on behalf of constituents

(a) A Member may lodge a question in writing in terms proposed by a person who lives in the Member’s electoral division.

(b) A question in writing given under this standing order may show the name of the person wh o has proposed the question.

(c) A Member may not lodge more than 25 questions in writing under this sessional order in a calendar year.

(d) Nothing in this standing order may be taken to mean that a Member must give notice of a question proposed to the Member by a person who lives in the Member's electoral division. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

13   Mr Price: To move—That standing order 104 be omitted and the following standing orders be adopted:

104A Answers

The answer to a question asked orally shall be relevant and:

(a) shall be concise and confined to the subject matter of the question: the asking of each question must not exceed four minutes;

(b) the asking of each supplementary question must not exceed one minute;

(c) the time taken to make and determine points of order is not to be regarded as part of the time for questions and answers;

(d) shall relate to public affairs with which the Minister is officially connected, to proceedings in the House, or to any other matter of administration for which the Minister is responsible; and

(e) shall not debate the subject to which the question refers.

104B  The standing orders that apply to the asking of a question orally shall generally apply to the answer. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

14   Mr Price: To move—That standing order 105 be amended and the following be inserted:

105C Replies to written questions

An answer to a question in writing shall be relevant to the question and shall be provided to the Member who asked the question within 30 days. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

15   Mr Price: To move—That standing order 209 be amended and the following be included:

(d) At the time provided for the presenta tion of petitions, the following arrangements shall apply to the presentation of petitions certified to be in conformity with the standing orders:

(i) in respect of each petition, the petitioner, or one of the petitioners, may present the petition to the House by standing at the Bar of the House and reading to the House the prayer of the petition, and

(ii) where a petitioner is not able to present the petition in accordance with standing order 209(d)(i), the Member who has lodged the petition may present it to the House by reading to the House the prayer of the petition. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

16   Mr Price: To move—That standing order 221 be replaced with the following:

221 Modernisation and Procedure Committee

(a) A Standing Committee on Modernisation and Procedure of the House of Representatives shall be appointed to inquire into and report on practices and procedures of the House generally with a view to making recommendations for their improvement or change and for the development of new procedures.

(b) The committee shall consist of the Speaker or his or her appointed Deputy Speaker, The Leader of the House or his or her appointed Deputy, the Manager of Opposition Business or his or her appointed Deputy and eight Members, four government Members and four non-government Members.

(c) The Secretary of the Committee will be the Clerk or Deputy Clerk. ( Notice given 9 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

17   Mr Cadman: To move—That this House:

(1) condemn the persecuti on of all religious minorities around the world;

(2) request that the Government of the Republic of Turkey, in the spirit of freedom and respect for human rights:

(a) return to the Christian minority foundations, as well as to individual Christian Assyri ans, Armenians and Hellenes, all the properties expropriated by the Turkish state;

(b) permit the re-opening of the Greek Orthodox Theological College on the island of Halke (Heybeliada);

(c) permit the re-opening of the Armenian Apostolic Seminary in Constantinople (Istanbul);

(d) permit other Christian denominations (Syriac Orthodox in particular) to operate seminaries of their own; and

(3) encourage all parties to work together to make a just and lasting and peaceful settlement to the Cyprus dispute. ( Notice given 10 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

18   Mr Kerr: To move—That this House:

(1) express concern that approximately eight Iraqi scientists have been held in detention in Iraq since the Coalition invasion in March 2003 despite the report of the Iraq Survey Group, accepted by the Governments of Australia, the UK and the US, finding that:

(a) no evidence that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction—the asserted basis for the Coalition invasion; and

(b) the scientists had not been engaged in the manufacture of biological, chemical or radiological weapons since 1991 ; and

(2) urge the Australian Government to call on those legally responsible for Camp Cropper to provide valid reasons for the continued detention of the scientists, or release them immediately, given that:

(a) the scientists have not been charged with any crime;

(b) the scientists are being held indefinitely in case they are wanted for questioning at some point in the future; and

(c) Australia bears some responsibility for the welfare of the prisoners due to its participation in the Coalition’s overthrow of the former Iraqi Government and its participation in weapons inspections. ( Notice given 10 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

19   Mr Gibbons: To move—That this House note the importance of Australia’s performing arts participants to our culture and national identity by:

(1) recognising the role young performers play as ro le models for Australian youth;

(2) acknowledging the contribution of all Australian artists in developing a distinctly Australian cultural identity;

(3) improving national investment in cultural education opportunities for young people in regional Australia;

(4) acknowledging particularly the role that young women have played in helping create an internationally-acclaimed cultural environment; and

( 5) investigating the encouragement of performing arts education at a tertiary level in regional Australia. ( Notice given 28 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

20   Mr Albanese: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise that half of the world’s languages are in danger of extinction, including many Australian aboriginal languages;

(2 ) acknowledge the many different linguistic communities present in the electoral division of Grayndler and the significant contribution each of these communities makes to the cultural and linguistic diversity of Grayndler;

(3) recognise that linguistic diversity is a key element of cultural diversity and that recognition of this diversity is a step towards greater intercultural understanding and harmony;

(4) acknowledge the important role that preserving one’s mother language plays in maintaining expressive, communicative and cultural traditions in our culturally diverse nation;

(5) recognise that 21 February has been designated by UNESCO as International Mother Language Day; and

(6) congratulate all community based organisations for promoting linguistic and cultural diversity in Australia and internationally. ( Notice given 28 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

21   Ms Hoare: To move—That this House:

(1) expresse its concern that since 1979 the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran has denied the Bahá'í community access to higher education as a means of wider persecution, w hich is based entirely on religious discrimination;

(2) call upon the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to recognise its legal obligations to provide access to education to all of its citizens, irrespective of religion, under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to which it is a signatory; and

(3) call upon the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to immediately cease the persecution of the Bahá'í community. ( Notice given 29 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

22   Mr Rudd: To move—That the Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia:

(1) note the United Nati ons General Assembly’s adoption in 1989 of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights that commits member states to abolish the death penalty within their borders;

(2) note that 50 countries have signed and ratified the Second Optional Protocol including Australia in 1990;

(3) call on the Government through its efforts at the United Nations General Assembly and the United Nations Human Rights Committee to mount an international campaign in conjunction with the European Union with the objective of causing all states to sign and ratify the Second Optional Protocol as soon as is practicable;

(4) resolve that the Australian Parliament shall work in conjunction with the other parliaments of the world through the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and the International Parliamentary Union to sponsor resolutions within these bodies calling for the abolition of the death penalty; and

(5) note today’s 4th annual ‘Cities for Life, Cities against the Death Penalty’ campaign, which currently involves more than 351 cities in 44 countries around the world, and calls on Australia’s states and cities to become part of that campaign. ( Notice given 30 November 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

23   Mr McClelland: To move—That this House:

(1) note:

(a) the Parliament’s and the Government’s support for the international ban on victim- activated anti-personnel landmines but that no corresponding ban exists on vehicle- activated anti-vehicle mines;

(b) that anti-vehicle mines contaminate at least 56 countries around the world with severe impacts from anti-vehicle mines occuring in Afghanistan, Angola, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Sudan;

(c) that, like anti-personnel landmines, anti-vehicle mines:

(i) are indiscriminant, failing to distinguish between civilian and military vehicles;

(ii) kill many more civilians, humanitarian aid workers and peace-keepers than soldiers, killing hundreds each year;

(iii) leave behind a deadly legacy that lasts for decades after conflicts finish;

(iv) disrupt the movement of essential goods and humanitarian aid in impoverished post-conflict countries, resulting in thousands of lives being put at risk; and

(v) have had little actual combat usefulness since World War II;

(d) that the presence of anti-vehicle mines makes the construction of improvised explosive devices easier for terrorist and insurgent groups;

(e) that the costs of clearing anti-vehicle mines are expensive and time consuming;

(f) that since 1974, three Australians have been killed by anti-vehicle mines;

(g) that publicly available information suggests that Australian Defence Force personnel have not used anti-vehicle mines in any conflict since the Second World War;

(h) that Australia’s stock of anti-vehicle mines is obsolete and used only for training purposes; and

(i) that the dominance of air power on the modern battlefield and the development of modern anti-tank weapons means that anti-vehicle mines are becoming more and more irrelevant to modern armed forces; and

(2) call on the Government to:

(a) introduce legislation to prevent the production, trade and use of anti-vehicle mines that are not command detonated, except for training in mine clearance by ADF personnel, effectively extending legislation that already exists for victim-activated anti-personnel landmines; and

(b) request that the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties conduct an inquiry into the best path forward for developing international consensus on an international instrument banning the use of, stockpiling of, trade in, and manufacture of, anti-vehicle mines that are not command detonated having regard to the:

(i) humanitarian impacts of anti-vehicle mines;

(ii) risks posed by anti-vehicle mines to ADF personnel in operations around the world;

(iii) evidence of the declining military utility of anti-vehicle mines on modern battlefields;

(iv) existing restrictions placed on anti-vehicle mines by Amended Protocol II of the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May be Excessively Injurious or To Have Indiscriminate Effects (CCW) and the effectiveness of these existing measures; and

(v) current discussion within the CCW with regard to a new Pr otocol to place restrictions on the design of, trade in, and use of, Mines Other Than Anti-Personnel Mines . ( Notice given 1 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

24   Mr Price: To move—That this House:

(1) congratulate the Rooty Hill RSL Youth Club on the occasion of its 40 th anniversary;

(2) recognise the important role it has played in the provision of sporting activities for the young people of the local area, such as cricket, rugby league, swimming, gymnastics, baseball, netball and soccer;

(3) acknowledge the fine work the club does in the local community, including participating and assisting in the Blacktown City Festival, National Tree Planting Day, the Salvation Army Red Shield appeal, the Mt Druitt Hospital Fete and the Royal Deaf and Blind Society’s Splash for Cash;

(4) note the role the club has played in celebrating Australia’s ANZAC heritage; and

(5) wishe the club well for the future. ( Notice given 1 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

25   Mr Danby: To move—That, in light of recent calls by world leaders, including the President of the United States, for a resolution of the Tibet issue prior to the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the statement by Professor Samdhong Rinpoche, Prime Minister of the Tibetan Parliament-in-exile at the 4 th World Parliamentarians for Tibet Convention in Edinburgh on 18 November 2005, this House call on the Government to:

(1) urge the Gov ernment of the People’s Republic of China to finalise negotiations with the Tibetan government-in-exile for the granting of autonomy to Tibet within the People’s Republic of China, prior to the 2008 Beijing Olympics;

(2) congratulate the Government of the People’s Republic of China for re-opening negotiations with the envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan govemment-in-exile;

(3) call on President Hu Jintao to demonstrate his personal commitment to resolving the issue of Tibet by meeting with His Holiness the Dalai Lama as soon as possible at a mutually agreed venue;

(4) call on the Government of the People’s Republic of China to issue an invitation to His Holiness the Dalai Lama to visit China and the traditional regions of Tibet;

(5) call on the Government of the People’s Republic of China to bring a halt to the destruction of historic buildings and other items pertaining to the cultural heritage of Tibet;

(6) request the Government of the People’s Republic of China to free all Tibetan political prisoners, including the Panchen Lama, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima;

(7) request the Government of the People’s Republic of China to commit to the preservation of the Tibetan language and Tibetan culture; and

(8) request that the Government of the People’s Republic of China give genuine consideration to the recommendations of the Declaration of the 41 World Parliamentarians for Tibet Convention, Edinburgh, 19 November 2005. ( Notice given 1 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

26   Mr Bowen: To move—That this House:

(1) note the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for R efugees (UNHCR) of October 2005 which outlines the persecution currently suffered by members of the Assyrian, Chaldean and Mandean communities in Iraq;

(2) note that a large number of individuals seeking entry to Australia from Iraq under the Special Humanitarian Program claiming persecution based on religion have had their applications denied; and

(3) call on the Australian Government to review its policy on refugee applications from members of religious minorities in Iraq in light of the UNHCR paper. ( Notice given 6 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

27   Mr Baird: To move—That this House:

(1) note with sadness the execution of the young Australian man, Mr Van Tuong Nguyen, in Singapore on Friday 2 December 2005;

(2) extend the sympathies of the Australian Parliament to Mr Nguyen’s family;

(3) call on Singapore to review its mandatory application of the death penalty;

(4) note with concern the increasing use of the death penalty around the world;

(5) note the demonstrable failure of the death penalty as a disincentive for crime;

(6) note the death penalty’s finality in cases where the innocent are convicted of capital offence;

(7) oppose capital punishment in all forms; and

(8) call on the Australian Government and this Parliament to use it’s influence to lobby other sovereign nations to abolish capital punishment as a method of administering criminal justice. ( Notice given 7 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

28   Mr Fitzgibbon: To move—That this House:

(1) refer to the Standing Committee on Economics, Finance and Public Administration for inquiry and report the most appropriate models for introducing greater scrutiny and transparency into the pr ocess for appointments to the Board of the Reserve Bank of Australia; and

(2) resolve that until the committee has reported on new measures and new measures have been introduced, the committee be required to consider all nominations for the Board prior to them being confirmed. ( Notice given 7 December 2005. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

29   Ms A. L. Ellis: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise that building i nsurance is an essential service and must be regulated;

(2) support and encourages:

(a) the principle for building insurance to be valued on either:

(i) agreed value (a value agreed between the insurer and the insured and not less than the market value for special inclusions); and

(ii) market value (the building cost based on figures from a quantity surveyor);

(b) settlement policies that reflect market or agreed value at the date a rebuild contract is signed and that takes into account the delay betwe en the period of the incident and the time the rebuild commences;

(3) call on the Government to expand the role of the Australian Valuation Office to set the market rates for building costs annually within regions for which insurance companies should base premiums and values and remove the CPI as an index;

(4) call on the insurance industry to implement terminology that is standardized and simplified industry wide; and

(5) call for Government and insurance industry funded prevention strategies, such as home fire risk reduction programs, in order to help keep insurance premiums low. ( Notice given 7 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

30   Mr Bowen: To move—That this House:

(1) note that the Government had previously given a commitment that a decision on the future of the Badgerys Creek airport site would be made by the end of 2005 ;

(2) note that 2005 has come and gone; and

(3) call on the Government to rule out permanently the construction of a second Sydney airport at the Badgerys Creek site. ( Notice given 7 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

31   Mr Randall: To move—That this House:

(1) call for the celebration of the Queen’s Birthday holiday, which i s observed in the States and Territories of Australia on various days and dates, to be replaced by a truly national day and that this uniform national public holiday be observed on the first Tuesday in November each year;

(2) call for the Queens Birthday holiday to be observed in States and Territories in a form of their choice but not in the form of a public holiday; and

(3) recognise that the Melbourne Cup has become a national event and is observed by the majority of Australians in some form and the fact that a large number of Australians take time during the day to observe and celebrate this event means it is highly appropriate that this annual event be made available to all Australians as it is observed in Melbourne. ( Notice given 7 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

32   Ms A. E. Burke: To move—That this house:

(1) note tha t there has been an increased global trend for companies to relocate various parts of their operations to locations outside of the country where the service is being delivered—a practice often referred to as off-shoring;

(2) note that the practice of off-shoring has seen jobs and skills lost from the IT and finance sectors in Australia and that Deloitte Research predicts that 15% of all financial sector jobs will be moved off-shore by 2008;

(3) recognise that participating in the global economy may deliver lower costs for local consumers and companies, however it must be done in a transparent and equitable manner; and

(4) call on the Government to act now, before the flood of jobs offshore sees Australia losing out, by:

(a) ensuring privacy protection for consumers;

(b) providing consumers with a ‘right to know’ so that service providers disclose the country of origin which provides their services, equivalent to country of origin product labelling;

(c) developing a national skills base that is suited to the changing needs of the economy;

(d) providing assistance in reskilling displaced workers; and

(e) ensuring employees of the country where the jobs are relocated are also protected by ILO Labour Standards. ( Notice given 8 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

33   Ms Hall: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise that Commonwealth base funding for the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program in New South Wales remains static (apart from indexation) for the five year term of the agreement;

(2) note that the existing budget for the Supported Ac commodation Assistance Program is not large compared to many other government programs with the allocation for NSW in 2005-2006 being $111.2 million shared between the NSW and Commonwealth Governments;

(3) call on the Australian Government and this Parliament to allocate additional funding resources for New South Wales Supported Accommodation Assistance to ensure the sustainability of a program that is vital to the health and wellbeing of Australian community life;

(4) recognise that the funding required is extremely modest at a time when the Commonwealth Budget is in record surplus; and

(5) note that as the homeless service system struggles to keep services operating on an ever diminishing funding pool, grave fears are held for the future for homeless people seeking assistance. ( Notice given 8 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

34   Ms Hall: To move—That this House condemn the Federal Government for:

(1)  failing to adequately fund healthcare in Australia;

(2) its role in causing the current doctor and nurse shortage in Australia; and

(3) failing to adequately address this shortage. ( Notice given 8 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

35   Mr Sawford: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise the diminishing effectiveness of the current educational framework used in Australian public and private schools; and

(2) recommend, as a matter of urgency, the introduction of a more balanced approach to education that is inclusive of all our children in all our schools. ( Notice given 15 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

36   Mr Price: To move—That this House:

(1) congratulate Rita Macalister on the occasion of her 100 th birthday;

(2) note that:

(a) Rita came to Australia in 1978 from Uruguay;

(b) Rita is the first Uruguayan woman living in Australia to turn 100; and

(c) her birthday celebrations were held in the presence of His Excellency, Mr Pedro Mó-Amaro, the Ambassador of Uruguay, Councillor Leo Kelly, Mayor of Blacktown City Council, Rita’s family, fellow residents of Residential Gardens and Mr Roger Price MP, the Federal Member for Chifley; and

(3) congratulate the board of management of Residential Gardens, the Chief Executive, Marta Aquino, and staff who work so hard to provide the highest level of care for the residents of Resi dential Gardens. ( Notice given 15 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

37   Mr Albanese: To move—That this House:

(1) reject arguments stating that intelligence is related to race;

(2) acknowledge that such comments have been inflammatory and have led to the vilification of people in the African community;

(3) reassert the need for a non-discriminatory immigration policy;

(4) call upon the Australian government to provide increased support for recently established communities; and

(5) recognise the contribution that these new communities are making to the wider Australian community. ( Notice given 16 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

38   Mr Garrett: To move—That this House:

(1) note numerous calls by the international community, including motions passed by the European Union, the United States Congress, the United Kingdom House of Commons and others, for a cessation of human rights abuses in Burma;

(2) note also statements by the Australian Government including most recently at the International Labor Conference in June 2005 concerning the current situation in Burma in relation to forced labour practices;

(3) recognise that there has been no meaningful progress towards democratic rule in Burma and that opposition leader Aung San Suu Ky remains under house arrest;

(4) recognise that the National Convention established by the Burmese junta cannot in its present state achieve a state constitution that will guarantee human rights, democracy and federalism in Burma, and to date has made nil progress;

(5) call on the Australian Parliament and Government to reject the sham National Convention;

(6) repeat calls for the urgent cessation of human rights abuses in Burma;

(7) repeat calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Nobel peace laureate Aung San San Suu Kyi, U Tin Oo, Khun Tun Oo and remaining political prisoners;

(8) urge the United Nations Security Council to act immediately, in concert with the international community, in relation to the current situation in Burma; and

(9) further call on the Government to continue to engage vigorously with regional states, including the People's Republic of China, and India, with a view to encouraging support for the placing of Burma on the agenda of the UN Security Council. ( Notice given  February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

39   Mr Baird: To move—That this Parliament:

(1) note with concern:

(a) the increasing use of the death penalty as a criminal sanction in our region;

(b) the execution of Mr Van Tuong Nguyen in the Republic of Singapore; and

(c) the plight of all Australians who are currently on death row;

(2) congratulate the Governor-General, the Prime Minister and the Australian Government and Opposition for their recent efforts on behalf of Austr alians on death row; and

(3) call on the Australian Government to:

(a) advocate with our regional neighbours the abolition of the death penalty or, as an interim measure, the establishment of a moratorium on executions; and

(b) encourage our regional ne ighbours to ratify the United Nations International Convention on Civil and Political Rights and the Second Optional Protocol. ( Notice given 27 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

40   Mr Albanese: To present a Bill for an Act to ratify the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. ( Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change (Kyoto Protocol Ratification) Bill 2006 ) ( Notice given 27 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

41   Mr M. J. Ferguson: To move—That this House recognise:

(1) that 21 April 2006 marks the 150 th anniversary of the eight hour day;

(2) the achievement of stonemasons and building workers who marched through the city of Melbourne 150 years ago, gathering supporters on the way to Parliament to demand work life balance;

(3) the rationale behind the eight hour day was to strengthen family and community by giving workers time for recreation, self-improvement and full participation in civil society; and

(4) that dividing work and family time remains the biggest challenge facing workers, with working parents finding it difficult to fit in picking up children from school, shopping, housework and childcare into their demanding lives. ( Notice given 27 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

42   Ms A. E. Burke: To move—That this House:

(1) recognise the plight of the thousands of community-based asylum seekers in Australia who are denied income support, work rights and Medicare access as a result of the Government's unfair and inflexible immigration policy, making survival nearly impossible without the assistance of various church and charity groups;

(2) acknowledge that in many cases this breaches the Refugee Convention and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child; and

(3) call on the Government to:

(a) abolish the 45 day rule, wh ich prevents community-based asylum seekers who make visa applications outside that period from receiving any form of income or health benefits; and

(b)  give all community-based asylum seekers in Australia work rights and access to Medicare. ( Notice given 28 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

43   Ms A. E. Burke: To move—That this House:

(1) note that it is estimated that around one in six Australian women will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime;

(2) condemn the reported statement of Sheik Faiz Mohamad that a victim of rape has “no-one to blame but herself”;

(3) acknowl edge the trauma and suffering of victims of sexual assault and rape;

(4) recognise the need for national leadership to combat these crimes; and

(5) urge the Government to:

(a) develop a national strategy to combat sexual assault and rape;

(b) increase funding and resources to:

(i) assist victims of sexual assault and rape; and

(ii) educate the community about these crimes;

(c) make sexual assault education mandatory in Australian schools; and

(d) nationalise sexual assault laws—taking a ‘best pract ice’ approach—and create a central board to review these laws regularly. ( Notice given 28 February 2006. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

Orders of the day

1   Fuel Quality Standards (Renewable Content of Motor Vehicle Fuel) Amendment Bill 2005 ( Mr Katter ) : Motion for second reading ( from 5 September 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 March 2006. )

2   Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change (Climate Change Trigger) Bill 2005 ( Mr Albanese ) : Motion for second reading ( from 5 September 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 March 2006. )

3   Parliamentary (Judicial Misbehaviour or Incapacity) Commission Bill 2005 ( Mr Kerr ) : Motion for second reading ( from 5 September 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 March 2006. )

4   WORLD POVERTY: Resumption of debate ( from 5 September 2005 ) on the motion of Mr Bartlett—That this House:

(1) recognises:

(a) the extent and gravity of world poverty and the urgency of tackling this situation; and

(b) that the most impoverished countries cannot escape the cycle of poverty without assistance;

(2) acknowledges recent e fforts by the Australian Government including increases in the Australian aid budget;

(3) supports the Millenium Development Goals and world efforts to halve world poverty by 2015; and

(4) urges the Australian Government to continue to work towards the achievement of those goals. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 March 2006. )

5   COMMUNITY PHARMACIES: Resumption of debate ( from 5  September 2005 ) on the motion of Mr M. J. Ferguson—That this House:

(1) expresses its opposition to majo r retail chains such as Woolworths and Coles being able to open pharmacies in supermarkets; and

(2) reaffirms its support for community pharmacies and in doing so recognises that the extension of pharmacies to major retail supermarkets will:

(a) lead to the closure of many community pharmacies, the majority of whom are hard working small businesses;

(b) lead to the loss of jobs amongst the 30,000 assistants currently employed in community pharmacies;

(c) put at risk the 80 million free services provided by community pharmacies to the Australian community, many of whom cannot afford the cost of going to the doctor due to the decline in bulk billing, and

(d) lead to the reduction in training and career opportunities for people who have chosen pharmacy as their career. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 March 2006. )

6   Government Advertising (Prohibiting use of taxpayers' money on party political advertising) Bill 2005 ( Mr K. J. Thomson ) : Motion for second reading ( from 12 September 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 27 March 2006. )

7   BANGLADESH: Resumption of debate ( from 12 September 2005 ) on the motion of Mr Baird—That this House:

(1) notes the historic and turbulent backgr ound of the state of Bangladesh and its cultural and religious diversity;

(2) calls on the government of Bangladesh to adhere to the terms of the 1997 peace agreement which calls for the:

(a) demilitarisation of the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT);

(b) for mation of a land commission to settle disputes;

(c) rehabilitation of international refugees and internally displaced people;

(d) establishment of a separate ministry for the CHT with an indigenous MP as its Minister; and

(e) formation of a police force up to the level of sub-inspector drawn from among the indigenous population; and

(3) calls on the Bangladeshi government to address the concerned region in a more compassionate and democratic way and also to recognise the autonomy of the Jumma people. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 27 March 2006. )

8   CLARKE REVIEW OF VETERANS’ ENTITLEMENTS: Resumption of debate ( from 12 September 2005 ) on the motion of Mr M. J. Ferguson—That this House:

(1) expresses its concern at the prosecution by the Howard Government of Melbourne Herald-Sun journalists Harvey and McManus for exposing the Government’s intention to adopt only five of the sixty five changes recommended in the Clarke review of veterans’ entitlements, including the Government’s intention not to overhaul the Totally and Partially Incapacitated Pension Scheme, and further

(2) re affirms the right of the journalists as provided for by their code of ethics not to reveal their sources and congratulates the journalists for doing the veterans a favour by revealing the Howard Government’s intention to largely ignore the recommendations of the Clarke review of veterans’ entitlements and in doing so, not deliver $500 million in extra pensions to veterans and war widows. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 27 March 2006. )

9   POVERTY: Resumption of debate ( from 12 September 2005 ) on the motion of Mrs May—That this House:

(1) recognises:

(a) that poverty and hunger re main the most important challenges facing the international community;

(b) that there are 2.2 billion children in the world, over 1 billion children are severely deprived of at least one of the essential goods and services they require to survive, grow and develop and millions of children are severely deprived of nutrition, water, sanitation facilities, access to basic health-care services, adequate shelter, education and information;

(c) that impoverished children often grow up to be impoverished parents who in turn bring up their own children in poverty and that in order to break the generational cycle of poverty, poverty reduction must start with children;

(d) the contribution the Australian Government agency AusAID makes to reducing poverty in developing countries and the real funding increase of over 11 percent that AusAID received in this year’s Federal Budget over last year’s Budget figure; and

(e) the work done by UNICEF on behalf of children of the world;

(2) calls on the Australian Government to:

(a) continue on with its outstanding overseas aid program; and

(b) continue to focus on the essential building blocks for progress towards the Millennium Development Goals; and

( 3) on a bipartisan level, supports the work being done by UNICEF. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 27 March 2006 .)

10   GAZA: Resumption of debate ( from 10 October 2005 ) on the motion of Mr Baird—That this House:

(1) congratulates the Israeli government on its disengagement from the Gaza and parts of the Northern West Bank;

(2) r ecognises the ongoing conflict and unrest in the region;

(3) calls upon the Palestinian authority to collect arms and munitions from terror groups operating in the Gaza, such as Hamas; and

(4) urges continued United Nations assistance for the humanitarian and security situation. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

11   FLU PANDEMIC: Resumption of debate ( from 10 October 2005—Dr Washer , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Gillard—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) experts agree that a flu pandemic, with the potential to kill millions of people, could occ ur at any time;

(b) this pandemic will most likely originate in South East Asia where a virulent strain of avian flu has already killed 50 people;

(c) the Commonwealth Government must make all due effort to ensure that Australia has the proper safeguards and measures in place, both onshore and offshore, to protect Australia against the impact of a possible flu pandemic;

(d) the Government has stated that a pandemic of avian flu could lead to millions of Australians contracting the disease, with 2.6 million people seeking medical attention, 58,000 hospitalisations and 13,000 deaths;

(e) relevant responsibilities for addressing a flu pandemic are scattered across a growing array of committees and bureaucracies at both the States and Federal level; and

(f) while current plans and strategies may be adequate, they are untested and under resourced and suffer from a lack of integration; and

(2) calls on the Howard Government to:

(a) make every effort to work co-operatively across jurisdictional lines and with the States and Territories;

(b) support our public hospitals and laboratories and the health care workforce to ensure that there is the capacity to plan for and manage a pandemic or other national medical emergency; and

(c) be more open and transparent about the measures that would be implemented for a pandemic and ensure that the public understand these. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

12   SLAPP SUITS: Resumption of debate ( from 10 October 2005—Mr Keenan , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Andren—That this House:

(1) notes the current situation in Australia and elsewhere of commercial enterprises using legal action to silence protesters;

(2) notes that in the United States these suits are known as ‘Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation’ or ‘SLAPP’ suits;

(3) notes that in many cases SLAPP suits have no real legal foundation, but their aim is to intimidate individual protesters into silence by the prospect of costly and time-consuming legal action;

(4) notes that common law action against protesters may take several different forms, including the torts of nuisance, unlawful interference in business, conspiracy to damage commercial interests and defamation, and that such torts are largely areas of State jurisdiction;

(5) notes that SLAPP suits could be discouraged if State Governments legislated to allow for the summary dismissal of unsoundly based SLAPP suits;

(6) notes that the insertion of an express right of freedom of speech in the Constitution, to impress upon courts that common law torts should be interpreted so as to ensure the protection of freedom of speech would also discourage unsound SLAPP suits;

(7) calls on State Governments, through the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General, to est ablish preliminary procedures which would allow unsoundly based SLAPP suits to be dismissed by a court at an early stage in proceedings;

(8) encourages the Attorney-General to place this matter on the agenda of the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General; and

(9) supports a referendum to amend the Constitution to include express recognition of the right of freedom of speech. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

13   Telemarketing (Protection of Privacy Rights of Residential Telephone Subscribers) Bill 2005 ( Ms A. E. Burke ) : Motion for second reading ( from 31 October 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

14   Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment Bill 2005 ( Mr Tanner ) : Motion for second reading ( from 31 October 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

15   LAOS AND UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE: Resumption of debate ( from 31 October 2005—Mr Laming , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Slipper—That this House:

(1) ackno wledges that the Lao PDR suffered the heaviest bombing that the world has ever known and remains today the most heavily contaminated country in the world;

(2) views with concern that 30 years after the Indo-China war the effects of unexploded ordnance (UXO) are still a serious problem, two thirds of Laos is affected with ten out of eighteen provinces remaining severely contaminated;

(3) is alarmed that there has been a substantial increase in civilian UXO casualties, particularly children, because population growth is increasing pressure to farm more land;

(4) notes that while the world community is well aware of landmines, there is little international understanding of the problems of UXO; and

(5) urges the Australian Government to continue to increase financial support for clearance efforts. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006 .)

16   HOMELESSNESS: Resumption of debate ( from 31 October 2005 ) on the motion of Mr B. P. O'Connor—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that in the last census, there were an estimated 100,000 homeless people in Australia; and

(b) the h igh social costs of homelessness; and

(2) recognises that:

(a) the reasons behind homelessness are complex and varied but that governments do have a role to play in ameliorating homelessness; and

(b) the joint Commonwealth/State funded Supported Accommo dation Assistance Program (SAAP) is an example of a vital service provided to the homeless and to those at risk of homelessness; and

(3) calls on the Federal Government to:

(a) promote awareness of the issue of homelessness among the public;

(b) develop strategies aimed at preventing homelessness;

(c) work co-operatively with other levels of government to reduce homelessness;

(d) increase funding for crisis accommodation and support; and

(e) set realistic targets for the reduction of homelessness. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006 .)

17   EDUCATION OF REGIONAL AUSTRALIANS: Resumption of debate ( from 31 October 2005—Mr Adams , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Wakelin—That this House:

(1) recognises that the Australian Government has made s ignificant progress for regional Australians in further education;

(2) notes that:

(a) the first principle should be that all Australians are entitled to reasonable access to education including tertiary education;

(b) regional Australians should not be disadvantaged by the additional costs of access to education to be competent in the workforce;

(c) there are significant additional costs for rural people in obtaining access to further education institutions only available in the capital cities or major urban centres; and

(d) the educational outcomes of regional Australians demonstrate a significantly lower proportion with University degrees and completed post-graduate studies when compared to the national outcomes; and

(3) calls on the Australian Gove rnment:

(a) to recognise that about 65% of Australia’s export income is derived from the regional areas of Australia;

(b) to recognise that the continual development of all skills will assist to maintain and expand this key economic sector;

(c) to recog nise that the cost of achieving greater educational equity is minimal when compared to the results possible; and

(d) to further analyse equity in the education of regional Australians to achieve fairer outcomes for all Australians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

18   FUEL PRICES: Resumption of debate ( from 7 November 2005—Ms Corcoran , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Byrne—That this House:

(1) notes the alarming and rapid increase in fuel prices in the south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne and across Australia;

(2) recognises the severe implications o f exorbitant fuel prices for local businesses and family budgets;

(3) acknowledges residents’ concerns about reported instances of possible price gouging practices within the petroleum refining and distribution industry; and

(4) asks the Treasurer to direct the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to formally monitor prices under Part VIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974 .  ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

19   CLEMENCY FOR MR NGUYEN TUONG VAN: Resumption of debate ( from 7 November 2005 ) on the motion of Mrs Moylan—That this House:

(1) acknowled ges the shared history and strong relationship between Australia and Singapore;

(2) strongly supports representations by the Prime Minister, the Hon. John Howard MP, to the Government of Singapore for clemency on behalf of Mr Nguyen Tuong Van, who was recently convicted and sentenced to death for drug trafficking by the Singapore Court;

(3) supports the representation by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Hon. Alexander Downer MP, the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon. Kim Beazley MP, Mr Kevin Rudd MP, and Members and Senators of the Australian Parliament who have supported a plea for clemency as outlined above;

(4) expresses profound regret that the Prime Minister of Singapore, HE Mr Lee Hsien Loong, and his Cabinet has rejected the pleas for clemency;

(5) notes that although the Singapore Court has adhered to due process, there remains an option for the Prime Minister and Cabinet of Singapore to overturn the death sentence, replacing it with a prison sentence;

(6) acknowledges the severe social impact that drug trafficking and drug use has on communities around the world and respects the strong stance by Singapore in its policies to combat this illegal trade and its worst effects;

(7) re-affirms Australia’s opposition to capital punishment;

(8) believes that there are mitigating circumstances arising from this case that warrant consideration of clemency for Mr Nguyen;

(9) respectfully calls on the Singapore Prime Minister and Cab inet to reconsider the plea by the Australian Government for clemency in the case of Mr Nguyen Tuong Van; and

(10) asks the Singapore Government to overturn the death sentence imposed on Mr Nguyen and replace it with an appropriate prison term. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

20   NATIONAL DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM: Resumption of debate ( from 7 November 2005 ) on the motion of Mrs May—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) Australia-wide, over a quarter of all drivers killed and seriously injured each year are young adult drivers;

(b) road traffic inj uries are a public health issue and road traffic crashes can be prevented;

(c) in addition to the burden of personal suffering, the monetary cost of crashes is in the order of $15 billion per annum; and

(d) during the 2004 election, the Australian Government committed to work with the States and Territories to introduce a national compulsory driver education scheme for all new provisional licence holders by 2007;

(2) calls on the Australian Government to deliver a National Education Program, that is both compulsory and intensive, through our schools involving a minimum of 120 hours of practical driver experience and nationally recognized credentials to be delivered as a Certificate II course; and

(3) on a bipartisan level provides young adults with the skills and knowledge necessary to stay safe on Australian roads. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

21   HUMAN RIGHTS IN ZIMBABWE: Resumption of debate ( from 28 November 2005—Ms Roxon , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Baird—That this House:

(1)  notes with concern the:

(a) ongoing human rights abuses in Zimbabwe;

(b)  lack of accountable government and the failure to hold free and fair elections;

(c)  ongoing suppression of opposition political parties and human rights activists; and

(d)  implementation of Operation Murambatsvina (Clean Out the Trash) which has led to the internal displacement and famine; and

(2)  calls on the Zimbabwean Government to:

(a) uphold the rule of law;

(b) ensure that its citizens human rights are respected;

(c) establish conditions and provide the means for citizens who have been internally displaced under Operation Murambatsvina to return voluntarily and with dignity to their homes or places of residence or to resettle voluntarily in another part of the country; and

(d) respect the rights of victims of Operation Murambatsvi na, including access to justice and appropriate reparations, including restitution, rehabilitation and compensation. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

22   Trade Practices Amendment (Collective Bargaining for Small Business) Bill 2005 ( Mr Fitzgibbon ) : Second reading—resumption of debate ( from 28 November 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

23   RENEWABLE TIDAL, WIND AND SOLAR RESOURCES: Resumption of debate ( from 28 November 2005 ) on the motion of Mr Tuckey—That the Government take an international lead in the development of hydrogen created from Australia’s renewable tidal wind and solar resources to replace costly hydrocarbon consumption in commercial and private transport. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

24   PETROL PRICES: Resumption of debate ( from 28 November 2005 ) on the motion of Mr Bowen—That this House:

(1)  notes that petrol prices in Australia remain at historically high levels, with the average price of petrol in Sydney at $1.19 a litre with prices in rural and regional areas being even higher;

(2)   particularly recognises the implications of exorbitant fuel prices for small businesses and family budgets; and

(3)   calls on the Government to direct the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to formally monitor prices under Part VIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

25   Crimes Act Amendment (Incitement to Violence) Bill 2005 ( Ms Roxon ) : Motion for second reading ( from 5 December 2005 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

26   PETROL PRICES: Resumption of debate ( from 5 December 2005—Mr Johnson , in continuation ) on the motion of Mrs Elliot—That this House:

(1) notes that petrol prices in regional areas have dramatically increased and are averaging well over $1.20 per l itre;

(2) recognises that these prices are becoming prohibitive for families and small businesses and are adversely impacting on tourism - an industry which many regional areas rely on; and

(3) calls on the Government to direct the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to formally monitor prices under Part VIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974 . ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

27   HEALTH: Resumption of debate ( from 5 December 2005—Ms Hall , in continuation ) on the motion of Mrs May—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) good health is the sin gle most important factor necessary for individuals to lead a happy and successful life;

(b) what individuals think, eat and the amount of activity they undertake are important determinants of health and wellbeing;

(c) Australians have a high incidence of preventable diseases that are influenced by lifestyle and behaviour including cardiovascular diseases, cholesterol, obesity and diabetes;

(d) for many Australians, health is simply access to medical goods and services; and

(e) once illness has taken hold, because of the mind/body connection, many do not have the mindset to better improve their health until they get a ‘scare’ which often comes too late; and

(2) calls on the Australian Government to:

(a) educate youngsters in schools about health and wa ys of preventing illness;

(b) educate couples before starting a family on healthy lifestyles for children;

(c) refocus the training of our doctors from ill health to good health with an emphasis on preventative care; and

(d) implement a National Health Strategy with a strong focus on preventative health. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006 .)

28   ADF RWANDAN SERVICE: Resumption of debate ( from 13 February 2006—Mr Scott , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Griffin—That this House:

(1) recognises that the atrocities that occurred in Rwanda between 1994 and 19 95 were some of the most horrific and appalling crimes seen in recent history;

(2) notes that between April and July 1994 up to one million Tutsi and moderate Hutus were killed at the hands of the militia;

(3) notes that in response, Australia deployed 657 ADF members to Rwanda in 1994 and 1995 as part of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Rwanda (UNAMIR);

(4) notes that the Australian contingent was largely a medical team whose key role was to provide medical care and health support for UNAMIR and, where possible, those injured by the massacres;

(5) acknowledges that Australian troops came under direct fire in and around refugee camps and faced the daily threat presented by landmines and other explosive devices placed to maim or kill Australian soldiers;

(6) acknowledges that these peacekeepers experienced the most horrible events such as the massacre of up to 8,000 men women and children at the Kibeho refugee camp in April 1995;

(7) notes with concern that many of these troops are now suffering serious mental and physical disabilities as the result of their service;

(8) notes that despite the severe trauma and the danger faced by Australian Peacekeepers in Rwanda, their service is still not treated as warlike service under the Veterans’ Entitlement Act; and

(9) calls on the Government to immediately reclassify this service from ‘hazardous’ to ‘warlike’ in recognition of the risk faced by these troops and the magnificent contribution they made to the protection of Rwandan citizens. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

29   NATIONAL YEAR OF COMMUNITY: Resumption of debate ( from 13 February 2006—Mr L. D. T. Ferguson , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Baird—That this House:

(1) recognises and supports the United Nations Association of Australia (NSW Division) for its resolution to declare 2006 the ‘National Year of Community’;

(2) acknowledges the importance of ‘community’ to the social fabric of Australian society; and

(3) notes the role of community in developing young Australians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

30   YOUNGER PEOPLE IN NURSING HOMES: Resumption of debate ( from 13 February 2006—Mrs Hull , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Tanner—That this House:

(1) notes that approximately 1,000 Australians under the age of 50 are living in nursing homes because they have a severe disability such as acquired brain injury;

(2) recognises that in most cases such accommodation is not appropriate, and that greater choice is needed for these younger people;

(3) acknowledges that as both federal and state governments are deeply involved in the aged care sector, both levels of government have a role to play in addressing this problem;

(4) notes that the Aged Care Innovations Pool has provided a small start to addressing the problem; and

(5) calls on federal and state governments to use the Council of Australian Governments process, and the current Senate Community Affairs Reference Committee Inquiry, as a basis for a combined effort to deal with this serious problem. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

31   INTER-COUNTRY ADOPTION: Resumption of debate ( from 13 February 2006 ) on the motion of Mrs B. K. Bishop—That this House:

(1) recognises that Australia’s rates of inter-country adoption are significa ntly lower than leading western nations;

(2) notes that the Commonwealth should take the primary role in managing Australia’s external relations in inter-country adoptions;

(3) recognises the role that non-government organisations should have in managing inter-country adoptions in Australia; and

(4) notes that parents of children adopted from overseas have less access to benefits and entitlements than the rest of the community. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

32   GENDER EQUALITY: Resumption of debate ( from 27 February 2006 ) on the motion of Mr Johnson—That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) a report from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) State of World Population 2005- the Promise of Equality: Gender Equity, Reproductive Health and Millennium Development Goals was released on 12 October and that the theme of the report is that gender equality reduces poverty, and saves and improves lives;

(b) a major platform for achieving sustainable development is gender equality and the empowerment of women; and

(c) gender inequities in all countries limit the economic and social participation of women in the building of healthy and dynamic nations;

( 2) encourages:

(a) the UNFPA to continue to work towards achieving gender equality; and

(b) the Government to continue to support the Millennium Development Goals because they have led to significant improvements in women’s health, safety and economic pa rticipation and increased their share in the benefits of strengthened economic growth; and

(3) recognises that these improvements have been achieved through culturally and religiously appropriate activities and has resulted in a reduction in the incidence of fistula, maternal and child mortality. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

33   PACIFIC HIGHWAY: Resumption of debate ( from 27 February 2006 ) on the motion of Mr Hartsuyker—That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that the Pacific Highway is a State road designed, built, owned, and maintained by the New South Wa les State Government;

(b) that there have been unacceptable delays and substantial cost over-runs in the upgrade of the Pacific Highway to dual carriageway standard from Hexham to the Queensland border;

(c) notwithstanding that the Pacific Highway is a state road, the Australian Government has made a substantial commitment to the upgrade under the Pacific Highway Reconstruction Program Agreement and Auslink;

(d) that there have been unacceptable delays to the commencement of work on by-passing population centres along the highway;

(e) tenders have been received for the construction of the Bonville Deviation and the State Minister for Roads, Mr Tripodi, plans to delay commencement of works until mid 2006; and

(f) the public consultation process has faile d to achieve route outcomes which are acceptable to communities along the highway; and

(2) calls on the New South Wales Labor Government to:

(a) exercise more stringent cost and project management control over the highway upgrade; and

(b) accelerate pro gress on this upgrade with a view to completing a dual carriageway between Hexham and the Queensland border by 2016. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

34   CHILD CARE: Resumption of debate ( from 27 February 2006 ) on the motion of Ms Plibersek—That this House:

(1)  notes:

(a) the spiralling cost of child ca re in many parts of Australia;

(b) that a large number of families cannot either find or afford high quality, local child care;

(c) the low labour force participation rates of women with dependant children in Australia, relative to many other OECD nations; and

(d) that families cannot claim the child care tax offset until after the end of the financial year following the year when child care fees had been paid, even though the Government has all the details necessary to process the offset earlier; and

( 2)  calls on the Government to:

(a) develop policies to create more places for children in high quality care in areas where more places are needed;

(b) recognise that planning is needed in the long day care market to correct market failures, and make it possible for parents with young children to participate in the workforce; and

(c) implement Labor’s proposals to allow families to benefit from the child care tax offset at least a year earlier than the Government’s scheme allows. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

35   INTER-PARLIAMENTARY UNION: Resumption of debate ( from 27 February 2006 ) on the motion of Mrs Irwin—That this House:

(1) notes that the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU):

(a) is the focal point for global parliamentary dialogue and, as the primary vehicle for strengthening parliaments world-wide, works globally for the establishment of representative democracy, providing an unparalleled parliamentary dimension to internati onal cooperation;

(b) at its Assemblies, initiates debates on issues of international interest and concern in order to raise awareness and action by parliaments and parliamentarians;

(c) defends and promotes human rights, particularly through the Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians;

(d) stresses the representation of both genders within the ranks of parliamentarians, facilitating the participation of women parliamentarians in its forums;

(e) encourages good governance and democratic capacity building through its programs and work with regional inter-parliamentary organisations, international inter-governmental and non-government organisations; and

(f) supports the efforts of the United Nations (at which it has observer status),   works in close co-operation with the UN and is seeking a closer strategic partnership with the UN so as to promote more substantive interaction and coordination between the IPU and the UN;

(2) welcomes recent reforms of the IPU that were strongly supported by Aust ralian delegations, and which have resulted in improved reporting mechanisms, including detailed and comprehensive financial statements; and

(3) commends past and present Australian delegations for their contribution to the IPU, as reflected in the leading role taken in the work of standing committees, drafting committees, geopolitical groups and the meeting of women parliamentarians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

36   alcohol education and rehabilitation foundation: Resumption of debate ( from 27 February 2006 ) on the motion of Mr Quick—That this House:

(1) acknowledges the fact that alcohol misuse remains the number one health and social issue confronting the Australian community;

(2) expresses its appreciation to the Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation for its outstanding efforts to date in raising public awareness of the dangers of alcohol and licit substance misuse and the importance of responsible consumption of alcohol;

(3) notes the effectiveness of the grants program administered by the Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation over the past four years;

(4) notes in particular the work of the Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation in addressing the scourge of inhalant abuse among young indigenous Australians; and

(5) calls on the Government to provide sufficient funding to the Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation’s Public Fund in the 2006-2007 Budget to enable the Foundation to continue its work in addressing the causes of, and harms arising from, alcohol and licit substance misuse. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 27 March 2006. )

 
 
 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS (standing orders 34, 39 and 40): Presentation and consideration of committee and delegation reports has precedence each Monday.

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS (standing orders 34 and 35) has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation reports, being interrupted at 1.45 p.m. and then continuing for 1 hour after the presentation of petitions each Monday.

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for determining the order of precedence and allotting time for debate on consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business. Its determinations for today are shown under “Private Member’s Business”. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation reports which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority by the Selection Committee on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).