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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS continued

Notice given for Thursday, 5 March 1998

* 1   Mr BRADFORD: To move—That this Parliament:

(1) congratulates the Australian Cancer Society and the National Heart Foundation for their ‘Call to action on tobacco’ and supports the endeavours of these organisations in their efforts to cut tobacco use particularly among children; and

(2) calls upon the Government to give urgent consideration to the recommendations contained in the ‘Call to action’, viz.:

(a) the development of a comprehensive smoking prevention strategy to reduce under-age smoking;

(b) improved funding for education and counselling;

(c) reform of the excise duty on tob acco;

(d) development of a State-based national licensing system for tobacco retailers;

(e) the establishment of an appropriate legislative framework to regulate nicotine and tobacco products; and

(f) ensuring that Australian tobacco companies are prevented from continuing to engage in misleading and deceptive conduct in relation to the health effect of smoking, the addictive qualities of nicotine and marketing practices that influence young people to take up smoking. ( Notice given 4 March 1998. )

 
 

Notices— continued

1   Mr M c Clelland: To move— That this House :

(1) notes that the Export Facilitation Sc heme (EFS) has significantly enhanced the export of motor vehicles and motor vehicle components;

(2) acknowledges that the current scheme discriminates against most car component exporters in the way export credits are calculated because while exporters of motor vehicles, engines and transmissions can earn credits under the EFS by reference to a formula that includes the value of raw materials in the exported goods, for all other component exports, raw materials are excluded in the application of a value added formula; and

(3) given the discrimination against most car component manufacturers under the current EFS, determines that a new replacement scheme should be equitable to all exporters of vehicle, engines and transmissions and also for exporters of other car components. ( Notice given 3 September 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 9 March 1998. )

2   Mr R. C. BALDWIN: To move— That this House :

(1) congratulates the Newcastle Knights on achieving entry into the Australian Rugby League grand final after only 10 years in the competition;

(2) notes the role of Paul Harragon as captain of the Newcastle Knights in leading the team to victory;

( 3) notes the role of the coach, Mal Reilly, in preparing the team;

(4) notes the contributions of Matthew and Andrew Johns, Mark Glanville, Robbie O’Davis, Darren Albert, Adam MacDougall, Adam Muir, Wayne Richards, Tony Butterfield, Troy Fletcher, Stephen Crowe, Mark Hughes, Bill Peden and Scott Conoley;

(5) notes the c ontributions of Owen Craigie, Leo Dynevor and Jason Moodie for the part they have played in raising the sporting profile of Aborigines and for being outstanding role models for younger Aboriginals;

(6) acknowledges the pride of the people of the Hunter in the spirit and determination of the Newcastle Knights; and

(7) wishes the Newcastle Knights every success in Sunday’s grand final against the Manly Sea Eagles. ( Notice given 23 September 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

3   Mr Beazley: To move— That this House :

(1) notes the publication of the National Accounts for the June Quarter of 1997 whic h show that for 1996-97, economic growth, as measured by GDP(A), was 2.5 per cent;

(2) notes the outcome for 1996-97 is:

(a) 1.3 percentage points below growth in 1995-96; and

(b) the lowest level of economic growth for five years;

(3) notes that the 2 .5 per cent result for 1996-97 is one percentage point below the 1996-97 Budget forecast growth of 3.5 per cent and 0.75 percentage points below the revised forecast of 3.25 per cent, as published in the May 1997 Budget;

(4) notes that the Government’s massive cuts to employment and industry programs through its two slash and burn Budgets, its constant talking down of the economy and failure to lift business and consumer confidence, are the main reasons why economic growth has dropped, why the job security of thousands of Australians is so much at risk and why it has failed to make a dent in the appallingly high level of unemployment which has actually increased under the Federal Government to 8.7 per cent, meaning nearly one million people are unable to find worthwhile work; and

(5) calls on the Government to restore those vitally important employment and industry programs and to inject more confidence into the community, and particularly the business community, so that economic growth can climb to over 4 per cent per annum, thus enabling thousands of jobs to be created, for unemployment to be reduced substantially and for the restoration of the job security of thousands of Australians. ( Notice given 23 September 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

4   Mr price: To move— That this House :

(1) deplores the imposition of accommodation bonds on Australia ’s frail aged seeking nursing home placement;

(2) notes that the Government has slashed funding from nursing homes by $500 million;

(3) expresses concern that accommodation bonds have no upper limit and may be as high as $250 000; and

(4) regrets that these measures may result in increased:

(a) incidence of elderly persons dying at home uncared for;

(b) elder abuse; and

(c) suicide. ( Notice given 22 October 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

5   MR R. C. BALDWIN: To move— That this House :

(1) acknowledges the damage that the introduction of diseases, such as Newcastle Disease, Infect ious Bursal Disease or other avian diseases, into Australia could have on our native bird life population and the Australian poultry industry;

(2) condemns the former Labor Government, and in particular former Labor Primary Industries Minister, Senator Bob Collins, for putting politics before science and as a consequence putting at risk the very future of the Australian poultry industry in not examining or questioning the science involved in determining the risk to Australia’s poultry industry, and as a consequence, our native bird life populations;

(3) commends the actions of the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy, Mr Anderson, for listening to the concerns of the poultry industry and taking steps to question the science that the former Labor Government had accepted without question;

(4) calls on the Government to reject the importation of raw or cooked chicken meat, based on sound scientific research reasons that threaten the bio-security of the Australian poultry industry and our native bird life; and

(5) recognises the efforts of the Australian poultry industry in exposing the fraud of the former Labor Government, and in particular former Labor Primary Industries Minister, Senator Bob Collins, in not taking action to examine the science and misconstrued assumptions by scientists in the testing carried out by Dr Denis Alexander, despite the pleadings of the industry that the scientific assumptions were flawed. ( Notice given 23 October 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

6   MR A. C. SMITH: To move— That the House :

(1) condemns the practice of child labour and calls on governments around the world to do all in their p ower to outlaw this evil practice; and

(2) calls on governments and the private sector to boycott products from countries that use children in this shameful way. ( Notice given 17 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

7   Mr M c Clelland: To move— That this House :

(1) notes the predominance of expert opinion that older motor vehicles cause greater air pollution and that passengers are more likely to sustain serious injury if they are a passenger in an older vehicle which is involved in an accident; and

(2) requests the Minister representing the Minister for the Environment refer to the relevant parliamentary committee the subject of the contribution of older (pre ADR37) motor vehicles to air pollution and recommend appropriate measures to abate their impact, in particular addressing the following aspects:

(a) the nature and extent of the problem;

(b) steps which have been undertaken in other countries to encourage the removal of older vehicles from circulation;

(c) the costs which would be involved in reducing the wholesale sales tax on new motor vehicles and whether those costs would be offset by higher revenue obtained as a result of greater turnover in sales of older vehicles;

(d) the viability of any other regulatory controls or incentives; and

(e) the social, health, economic and environmental impacts of any proposed measures. ( Notice given 25 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

8   Mr M c Clelland: To move— That this House :

(1) notes that there exists significant scientific controversy as to the effects of exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted from mobile phone towers;

(2) resolves that current legislation should be amended to require that mobil e phone towers not be installed within a radius of 300 metres from schools and playgrounds;

(3) resolves that the telecommunications industry be levied to raise funds to conduct research into the health and safety aspects of electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile telephone towers; and

(4) calls for a review of Australian standard AS2772 which relates to electromagnetic radiation emissions. ( Notice given 25 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

9   Mr M c Clelland: To move— That this House :

(1) notes that the proposed closure of the St George campus of the University of New South Wales (UNSW) directly arises from the fact that the federal Government has forced cuts of 1900 student places and $14.4 million from the UNSW;

(2) notes that the Prime Minister has been grossly irresponsible in stating that the fate of the St George campus of the UNSW, which is one of Australia’s premier teacher education facilities, is a matter of autonomy for the UNSW;

(3) notes that any directive by the NSW Minister for Education and Training, Mr Aquilina, to attempt a transfer of the control of the campus from the UNSW to the University of Wollongong without proper and adequate federal Government funding would result in:

(a) the University of Wollongong, which has already had its funding reduced by the federal Government, being compelled to assume a significant additional expense;

(b) the likely termination of employment of existing academic and administrative staff empl oyed at the St George campus in circumstances where it would be doubtful that they would be entitled to any severance or redundancy pay;

(c) uncertainty for existing students who have been guaranteed that their current courses at the St George campus will be completed given the inability of the University of Wollongong to commit itself to replicating those courses without adequate funding; and

(d) the potential for NSW taxpayers to be exposed to significant damages arising from the State’s compulsory acquisition of property in circumstances where the University of Wollongong is unable to provide an indemnity against such a damages claim; and

(4) calls on Government Members and Senators to immediately acknowledge the federal Government’s responsibility for the closure of the St George campus and to constructively apply their energy within their own Government to ensure that the necessary federal Government funding is provided to ensure that the valuable work of the St George campus can continue. ( Notice given 26 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

10   Mr PRICE: To move— That this House :

(1) urges the N SW Government to approve the preparation of a regional environmental plan for the Australian Defence Industry site in the electoral divisions of Chifley and Lindsay;

(2) notes that this will benefit western Sydney by:

(a) investment of $13 billion;

(b)  providing 630 hectares of open space, equivalent to 3 Centennial Parks, at no cost to any government;

(c) providing significant jobs during construction and after completion;

(d) providing green corridors beyond the development and significantly to biodiversity; and

(e) preserving valuable bushland and Aboriginal heritage; and

(3) notes that the developers will provide as part of their section 94 contributions (a) neighbourhood centres and community development workers, (b) youth services, (c) aged and disability services, (d) children’s services, (e) cultural and library services, (f) education, (g) sport and recreation facilities, (h) Aboriginal and non-English-speaking-background services and (i) botanical and geological gardens. ( Notice given 27 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

11   Mr PRICE: To move— That this House :

(1)  welcomes the second Laughlin Report which outlines options for the five Mt Druitt, NSW, high schools;

(2) notes that the Super High model offers the best chance of improving educational outcomes for students in Mt Druitt;

(3) regrets that the Teachers Federation successfully fought the introduction of a senior high school with junior feeder high schools ten years ago; and

(4) urges the Federation to change their entrenched opposition to all high schools other than comprehensive high schools even when they are collapsing. ( Notice given 27 November 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

12   Mr FILING: To move— That this House calls on the Australian Government to reverse its recent decision to refuse Australian entry visa s for several East Timorese, resident in Portugal, who have been invited to speak at a conference in Perth, which aims to find a just, negotiated settlement of the situation in East Timor. ( Notice given 1 December 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

13   Mr E. H. Cameron: To move— That the House :

(1) acknowledges the contribution of palliative care to the proper treatment of patients with a terminal illness;

(2) recognises the work of health professionals and volunteers in the field of palliative care and commends those workers for their commitment to patients, the compassion with which they undertake their work and the commitment they have to palliative care as a proper treatment of patients with a terminal illness;

(3) acknowledges the benefits to patients, families and health care providers of palliative care;

(4) further recognises the benefits to both patients and families of palliative care provided to patients in their home rather than at medical institutions;

(5) urges the Government to continue the provision of funds to palliative care with a view to increasing funding to palliative care provided at home in particular; and

(6) implores the Government to investigate the merit of encouraging the provision of palliative care at the patient’s home, and the funding for this, in view of the benefits for both the patient and their family as well as the Government. ( Notice given 1 December 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

14   Mr E. H. Cameron: To move— That the House :

(1) expresses its abhorrence of domestic violence;

(2) notes that children are as much victims of domestic violence as women;

(3) welcomes the Government’s initiative, ‘Partnerships on Domestic Violence’, to further address the consequences of domestic violence and preven t it from happening in the future;

(4) notes that children who are exposed to domestic violence suffer psychological, behavioural, developmental and physical problems, as a result, and that many children who are exposed to domestic violence unfortunately grow up accepting it as a fact of life;

(5) urges greater consideration of children in seeking solutions to domestic violence and providing resources to protect victims of domestic violence and prevent domestic violence in the future;

(6) encourages the federal and State government’s to maintain funding to prevent domestic violence and protect victims of it; and

(7) urges all Australians to be open in their revulsion of domestic violence by speaking out against it, reporting it and assisting victims of it. ( Notice given 3 December 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

15   MS GAMBARO: To move— That this House :

(1) notes that the Youth Parliament of Queensland met in September-October 1997 for a second successful session at Parliament House, Brisbane;

(2) congratulates all those involved in the meetings of the Youth Parliament—the participa nts who represented Queensland young people, the teachers, schools, youth organisations and leaders as well as their parents whose encouragement and support enabled such a representative group to come together and to articulate the views and concerns of young people on many issues which are of concern to all Australians;

(3) particularly commends the initiative and work of the Queensland Young Men’s Christian Association in being the principal organisers of the Youth Parliament and the Speaker, Members and staff of the Parliament of Queensland who provided facilities and support for the Youth Parliament; and

(4) looks forward to the time when youth parliaments are firmly established in all States and Territories as well as on a national basis. ( Notice given 6 December 1997. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

16   Mr E. H. Cameron: To move—

(1)  That the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs conduct a stocktake of the cost of living of aged pensioners and retirees such that an accurate picture can be drawn of the difficulties of surviving on the pension and fixed limited incomes and that the committee:

(a) compare the formula used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics of measuring the cost of living with anecdotal evidence of the actual increased cost of living of pensioners and retirees;

(b) review the various methods of government assistance to aged pensioners and retirees, the quality of assistance and the value of the assistance to pensioners and retirees and recommend whether any changes should be made;

(c) determine whether the legi slative requirement that pensions be set at 25 per cent of average male weekly earnings is suitable; and

(d) recommend changes to the Government which will better target assistance to pensioners, with a view to how such benefits will meet the needs of pensioners in future years in terms of the increased representation of aged persons as a proportion of Australia’s population.

(2) That the above inquiry be conducted mindful of the precarious nature of the federal budget due to the previous Government’s mis management. ( Notice given 2 March 1998. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

17   MR PYNE: To move— That this House :

(1) agrees that former Labor Prime Minister Paul Keating’s unsuccessful attempt to implement substantial tax reform in 1985 was an acknowledgment of the contemporary failings of the taxation system;

(2) recognises that the former Labor Government failed over 13 years to implement substantial tax reform;

(3) agrees that the Government’s achievement in fixing Labor’s $10 billion budget black hole proves that this Government has the resolve and the courage to implement significant and sensible taxation reform; and

(4) notes that the Opposition has no plans for substantial taxation reform and favours a return to the tax and spend policies of the past that led to high interest rates, high unemployment and low growth that had it been allowed to go unchecked could have dangerously exposed Australia in the environment of an Asian financial crisis. ( Notice given 2 March 1998. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

Orders of the day

DAW AUNG SAN SUU KYI : Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 1997—Mr Price, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Sinclair—That this House:

(1) expresses its warmest wishes to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on her 52nd birthday on 19 June 1997;

(2) recognises her selfless commitment to the causes of peace and democracy in Burma for which she received the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize;

(3) notes that she is still denied the right of movement, association and assembly, that access to foreign visitors can be arbitrarily withdrawn, and that she is denied regular access by her husband and two sons; and

(4) endorses the strong diplomatic support of the Australian Government for the case of Suu Kyi, the cause she represents so eloquently and courageously and for the future well-being of the people of Burma. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 March 1998. )

OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS SERVICES : Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr McClelland—That this House:

(1) expresses its concern at the cutting of the operational subsidy to Out of School Hours (OOSH) services and the imposition of an increased threshold of eligibility for child care assistance to families;

(2) notes that:

(a) cuts to Out of School Hours funding will result in OOSH services having to increase fees to cover the loss of the operational subsidy which will threaten the quality of child care as OOSH services will be forced to cut costs to meet budgets;

( b) the loss of the operational subsidy means that OOSH services could be facing high administration costs in order to meet the new fee relief system which could result in the closure of smaller services; and

(c) the consequences of cutting funding to OOSH services will result in a situation whereby parents will be dropping children off at school early in the morning to unsupervised playgrounds and picking them up from school well after the school day has finished, or allowing their children to remain in an unsupervised home in the morning and return to an unsupervised home in the evening; and

(3) calls upon the Federal Government to revoke its decision to cut operational subsidy to OOSH services and to restore the previous access to child care assistance for eligible families. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 March 1998. )

TEXTILE, CLOTHING AND FOOTWEAR INDUSTRIES : Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr Lieberman—That this House:

(1) notes with concern the recommendations of the Industry Commission on the Textile, Clothing and Footwear Industries;

(2) notes, in particular, the likely loss of thousands of jobs throughout Australia, mainly in the regions, if the recommenda tions of the report are adopted; and

(3) calls on the Government to reject the recommendations and to legislate for a tariff pause from 2000 to 2005 to enable the full benefit of microeconomic reform to be achieved, thus strengthening the economy and industry, and maintaining jobs for Australians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 March 1998. )

4   plebiscite for an australian republic BILL 1997 ( Mr Beazley ) : Second reading ( from 3 September 1997 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 9 March 1998. )

5   CUSTOMS tariff amendment BILL (no. 5) 1997 ( Mr Crean ) : Second reading ( from 22 September 1997 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE PERSONNEL IN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS : Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr Price—That this House:

(1 ) applauds the efforts of those Australian Defence Force Personnel who served in Australia’s peacekeeping operations;

(2) congratulates Major Carol Vaughan-Evans, Lieutenant Thomas Tilbrook, Warrant Officer Rodrick Scott and Corporal Andrew Miller on their receipt of the first gallantry medals since the Vietnam War for their distinguished service in Rwanda, particularly during the massacre of civilian refugees at Kibeho in April 1995;

(3) expresses the thanks and pride of all Australians for their efforts; and

(4) regrets that the Minister for Defence Industry, Science and Personnel felt it was too costly and impractical to receive in person the Parliament’s congratulations, gratitude and recognition of their distinguished service and apologises for the Minister’s slight of these gallant soldiers. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN NAVY SERVICE IN MALAYA : Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr Adams—That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) the members of the Royal Australian Navy who served in Malaya between 1955 and 1960 are t he only Australians to be deliberately excluded from eligibility for repatriation benefits for honourable ‘active service’ under the Veterans’ Entitlements Act 1986 ;

(b) the members of the Australian Army and the Royal Australian Air Force serving in Malaya were not similarly excluded; and

(c) a letter, dated 11 November 1955, from the Department of the Navy to the Department of the Treasury stated that the date on which RAN ships were allotted for duty as the RAN component of the Strategic Reserve was 1 July 1955;

(2) calls on the Minister for Defence to take action to ensure that members of the Royal Australian Navy between 1955 and 1960 are recognised as being allotted for duty in the Malayan theatre; and

(3) calls on the Minister for Veterans’ Affair s to take action to ensure that naval veterans of the Malayan theatre are recognised with the relevant campaign medal and the Returned from Active Service Badge. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

RESCUE OF THE THAI ECONOMY : Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Ms Hanson—That this House:

(1) condemns the Government for committing $1.3 billion to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) rescue of the Thai economy without recourse to the Australian Parliament;

(2) calls on the Government to publish immediately all the details of the currency swap undertaken by the Reserve Bank; and

(3) calls on the Government to freeze its undertaking pending a full parliamentary inquiry into the circumstances surrounding Australia’s participation in the IMF rescue. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

population planning and community development in tHAIland and vietnam: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997—Ms Ellis, in continuation ) on the motion of Mrs Stone—That this House:

(1) recognises the dedication and commitment of the Thai and Vietnamese Governments as they work towards achieving their population planning and community development goals;

(2) reco gnises the coordinating role Thailand is now playing in population planning and reproductive health work in its region;

(3) recognises the enormity of the task and commends the commencement of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention programs in Thailand;

(4) r ecognises the appropriateness and significance of AusAID projects aimed at partnering and supporting communities as they work to improve reproductive health, community development, general hospital facilities and HIV/AIDS treatments in Thailand and Vietnam; and

(5) notes the existence of the All party Parliamentary Committee on Population Planning and Development which focuses on the need for population policy that takes into account a nation’s ecological, social and economic resources.  ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

10  CHILD Abuse: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Ms Jeanes—That this House:

(1) congratulates the organisers of Child Protection Week and recognises its important role in raising the issue of child abuse;

(2) acknowledges the extent of the most insidious form of child abus e, paedophilia, identified in reports including Paedophilia in Queensland by the Childrens Commission of Queensland and the Paedophile Inquiry by the Royal Commission into the NSW Police Service;

(3) acknowledges that paedophilia constitutes a tragedy of national proportions; and

(4) is committed to eradicating the disease of paedophilia by addressing its causes and raising the public’s awareness of its extent and the trauma that it causes to the victims, our children. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

11  sbs television services to regional areas: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr Hicks—That this House:

(1) acknowledges the expansion of SBS television services to regional areas by the present Government;

(2) notes that there is a significant number of people throughout rural and region al areas wishing to access the service; and

(3) affirms its support for the continuation of the expansion program to areas not yet receiving the service across regional Australia. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

12  CHILDREn and younger australians: Resumption of debate ( from 22 September 1997 ) on the motion of Mr Fitzgibbon—That this House:

(1) recognises the important role today’s children and younger Australians will play in determining Australia’s future prosperity;

(2) recognises that the overwhelming majority of younger Australians have no voice in the decision making processes which affect them;

(3) recognises that younger Australians are growing increasingly cynical towards politicians and the political processes and increasingly pessimistic about Australia’s future;

(4) recognises that such pessimism is likely to affect the attitude of younger Australians toward key aspects of Australian society;

(5) recognises the need to keep the interests of children and young people at the forefront when considering policy direction; and

(6) calls on the Government to establish an Office of Children and Young People within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to provide advice to the Prime Minister on matters affecting children and young Australians. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 9 March 1998. )

13  ENDANGERED SPECIES : Resumption of debate ( from 29 September 1997—Mr Albanese, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Cobb—That this House:

(1) notes that many Australian animals have become extinct or are near to extinction in the wild over the last 200 years, especially small to medium sized marsupials in temperate to arid areas; and

(2) calls for action to be taken to:

(a)  identify the full range of animals and habitats affected by extinction;

(b) identify the causes of extinction, including the detrimental effects of introduced predators and increased grazing pressures;

(c) allocate adequate resources to undertake captive breeding programs in appropriate locations where animals still exist in captivity, to fully study the lifecycles of the animals, gather scientific evidence generally and build their numbers up to lessen their endangered status;

(d) undertake appropriate scientific programs with the aim to eliminate predators such as foxes and feral cats, so that native animals can eventually be released back into their original habitats; and

(e) as a matter of priority and noting that most of the animals lost have been in arid areas, fund the Broken Hill endangered species breeding proposal to complement the existing Taronga Park Zoo and Western Plains Zoo breeding programs in NSW. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

14  INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS : Resumption of debate ( from 29 September 1997—Mr McDougall, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Brown—That this House:

(1) congratulates the International Transport Workers Federation and applauds the support it provided for the union stevedores at the port of Cairns who were under siege as a result of the operation of the Australian Govern ment’s Workplace Relations Act;

(2) endorses the slogans “United we stand, divided we beg” and “Workers united can never be defeated” which have been raised in many recent industrial confrontations;

(3) expresses its support for the courageous miners at Hunter Valley No. 1 Mine and for their wives and children who have stood with them on the picket line in defence of their jobs, families, communities and the right of collective action;

(4) recognises that one to one negotiations between employees and management in the pursuit of individual contracts is not a process conducted between equals but a process stacked in favour of the vastly more powerful position of employers; and

(5) urges the trade union movement, all employees and the wider community to continue to resist the savage attacks being made on Australia’s traditional and civilised approach to negotiation, conciliation and arbitration in the area of industrial relations. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

15  OLDER MOTOR VEHICLES: Resumption of debate ( from 27 October 1997) on the motion of Mr McClelland—That this House:

(1) acknowledges the increasing environmental and safety problems posed by old worn out motor vehicles;

(2) recognises that the removal of older motor vehicles from our roads would reduce pollution such as lead and other pollutants by increasing the proportion of vehicles using unleaded fuel and fitted with catalysts;

(3) recognises that older vehicles are involved in proportionally more road accidents and that the removal of older vehicles from our roads would have substantial community benefits and health costs savings; and

(4) recommends a reduction in wholesale sales tax on motor vehicles which would:

(a) add between 150 000 to 200 000 new vehicles to the market per annum;

(b) give a substantial boost to vehicle and component manufacturing with a substantial impact on employment in those industries;

(c) give a substantial boost to employment in vehi cle distribution retailing and wholesaling;

(d) increase State revenues through stamp duty and registration increases; and

(e) make better quality motor vehicles more affordable to average Australians due to the “trickle down” effect as new vehicles enter the top of the market. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

16  DEVELOPMENT APPROVAL PROCESS: Resumption of debate ( from 27 October 1997) on the motion of Mr McDougall— That this House :

(1) expresses its concern that the current lengthy and uncertain process of securing necessary development approvals acts as a significant disincentive to attracting and securing new capital investment in Australia;

(2) acknowledges that the approval process differs between States and Territories and is cumbersome and confusing for potential investors;

(3) agrees that the time taken to negotiate and complete the approval process is well behind that achieved elsewhere in other countries and demands improvement;

(4) supports a uniform national approval process to be agreed between the Commonwealth and the States, and to be administered by the States and Territories; and

(5) calls for concerted action to achieve a streamlined appeal process recognising the need to seek changes to relevant legislation. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

17  GAMBLING: Resumption of debate ( from 27 October 1997) on the motion of Mrs E. J. Grace—That this House recognises the adverse effects of gambling on society in general and on the small business sector in particular and takes steps to discourage State governments from expanding gambling as a means of raising revenue. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

18  DIABETES : Resumption of debate ( from 17 November 1997—Dr Southcott, in continuation) on the motion of Mr Hollis—That this House:

(1) recognises that 14 November 1997 was World Diabetes Day;

(2) commends the Government for its recognition of the seriousness of diabetes in making it one of the five health prio rities;

(3) recognises that an increasing proportion of the Australian population is affected by diabetes, in that every twelve minutes someone, somewhere in Australia is diagnosed with this chronic disease; and

(4) urges the Government to continue funding research into diabetes and the National Diabetes Strategy and to promote a widespread education campaign through Diabetes Australia to alert the population of the risks of developing the disease. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

19  RURAL WOMEN CENSUS DATA : Resumption of debate ( from 17 November 1997 ) on the motion of Mrs Bailey—That this House:

(1) recognises the important contribution by rural women to the national economy and local community infrastructure;

(2) acknowledges that Census data does not accurately record the economic or voluntary contribution by rural women;

(3) believes that this lack of accurate Census data should be addressed by changes to the Census form that will enable rural women to reco rd the true extent of their economic and voluntary contribution; and

(4) calls on the Government to refer these proposed changes to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

20  AUSTRALIAN SPORTSMEN AND SPORTSWOMEN : Resumption of debate ( from 17 November 1997—Mr K. J. Thomson, in continuation) on the motion of Mr R. D. C. Evans—That this House:

(1) expresses its warmest congratulations to the many Australian sportsmen and sportswomen who have achieved so much recently representing themselves and their country to the highest levels;

(2) recognises our world champions—Cathy Freeman, Michael Doohan and the mens under 23 basketball team—and congratulates them on their achievement;

(3) congratulates our Pan Pac swimming team, the Australian cricket team, Karrie Webb, the Australian world athletics team and the Australian cycling team on their achievements; and

(4) asks the Australian media to become more responsible when reporting sporting achievement and commenting about our sporting champions. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

21   Customs Legislation (Economies in Transition) Amendment Bill 1997 ( Mr Crean ): Second reading ( from 24 November 1997 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

22   Customs Legislation (Willett Review of Anti-Dumping Measures) Amendment Bill 1997 ( Mr Crean ): Second reading ( from 24 November 1997 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

23  HELLFIRE PASS : Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 1997—Mr Brough, in continuation) on the motion of Mr Adams—That this House:

(1) recognises the importance of Hellfire Pass, the immediate railway line route and adjacent camps in Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand, where Australians were prisoners of war;

(2) calls on the Government to set in m otion the means by which the Thai Government can be approached to have these sites officially recognised as important to Australia;

(3) calls on the Government to seek a special status of this area in the form of a reserve or park, to be administered under the War Graves Act, and which will ensure Australians have permanent access; and

(4) is of the opinion that the museum under construction and being built with Australian funds should be guaranteed sufficient funds to allow a curator to be located permanently in the region to continue the development of the site. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

24  AUSTRALIANS OF BALTIC BACKGROUND : Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 1997) on the motion of Mr Zammit—That this House:

(1) notes that November 1997 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the arrival in Australia o f the first postwar migrants from Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia;

(2) recognises the important contribution made to migrant welfare, education and support by the (a) Baltic Council of Australia, (b) Council of Estonian Societies in Australia, (c) Latvian Federation of Australia and New Zealand and (d) Australian Lithuanian Community; and

(3) records its appreciation for the significant contribution which Australians of Baltic background have made to our nation’s economic, social and cultural development. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

25  CORPORATE RESTRUCTURING : Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 1997—Mr Charles, in continuation) on the motion of Mr McClelland—That this House:

(1) notes the increasing occurrence of corporate restructuring;

(2) acknowledges that corporate restructuring frequently results in substantial job redundancies; and

(3) amend the Workplace Relations Act to:

(a) redefine transmission of business to include the pheno mena of outsourcing of services;

(b) protect the accrued entitlements of workers where employment is transferred to a new entity as a result of corporate restructuring or outsourcing; and

(c) recognise continuity of service for workers transferred to another entity as a result of corporate restructuring or outsourcing. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

26  PRIVATE HEALTH INSURERS AND COMPENSATION CLAIMS: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 1997—Mrs Stone, in continuation) on the motion of Mr Fitzgibbon—That this House:

(1) notes that Australians who have su stained an injury or been involved in an accident which may be the subject of a claim for compensation are unable to claim benefits from private health insurers to assist with the payment of medical and other costs incurred as a result of the accident or injury;

(2) is concerned at the extreme hardship this creates for many Australians and Australian families, often extending over many years; and

(3) calls on the Government to present to the House, as a matter of urgency, a bill which will:

(a) require p rivate health insurers to pay provisional benefits to claimants in respect of services which are the subject of compensation claims; and

(b) provide for private health insurers to be reimbursed for these payments from the compensation paid when this occurs. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

27  PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 1997) on the motion of Mr E. H. Cameron—That this House:

(1) acknowledges that Australia’s health system is reliant on a successful private health insurance industry complementing the public health system;

(2) notes with concern the neglect of the former Labor Government to stem the exodus from private health insurance between 1984 and 1996;

(3) calls on the Australian Labor Party to agree to supporting incentives for private health insurance as part of its policy platform at its annual conference in 1998;

(4) expresses its support for the incentives provided by the Federal Government for people to maintain private health insurance and for those who do not have it, to take it out;

(5) calls on private health insurers to minimise any premium increases which may force more Australians to reconsider their membership;

(6) welcomes any further policies which encourage people who can afford to take out private health insurance, to do so; and

(7) calls on the G overnment to refer the issue of private health insurance and the Australian health system to the Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs for further solutions to alleviate the decline in private health insurance caused by the policies of the former Labor Government. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

28  UNEMPLOYMENT IN THE ACT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 1997) on the motion of Ms Ellis—That this House notes:

(1) that the ACT economy has been driven into recession by the Howard Federal Government and the Carnell ACT Government;

(2) that yo uth unemployment in the ACT exceeded 50 per cent in consecutive months in late 1996 and has consistently been above the national average since the election of the Howard and Carnell Liberal Governments;

(3) the significant reduction in public sector employment in the ACT flowing from Federal and Territory budget cuts;

(4) the absolute failure of the ACT Liberal Government to implement policies that will contribute to a reduction in the high levels of un employment; and

(5) the implicit admission by the Howard Government that it has no answer to the unemployment crisis in the ACT. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

29  BANK FEES AND CHARGES: Resumption of debate ( from 2 March 1998—Mr Charles, in continuation) on the motion of Mr Price—That this House:

(1) cond emns the failure of the Treasurer to allow the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to monitor bank fees and charges;

(2) condemns the Treasurer for permitting the banks to massively increase fees and charges for battlers and pensioner bank customers;

(3) regrets that the Treasurer has allowed the banks to abandon affordable banking for battlers and pensioners in favour of maintaining or increasing bank profits; and

(4) notes with regret the Treasurer’s priority of encouraging billion dollar profits for the banks and multi-million dollar salaries for banking executives at the expense of the ordinary customers of the banks. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

30  DRUG EPIDEMIC: Resumption of debate ( from 2 March 1998—Mr Albanese, in continuation) on the motion of Mr Hicks—That this House:

(1) notes the terrible damage being done to Australians, particularly young Australians, by the present street drug epidemic;

(2) deplores the fact that in Australia it is estimated one out of two teenagers have experimented with marijuana compared with one in 20 in Sweden;

(3) recognises that marijuana is a mind altering drug; and

(4) calls on all Australian governments to implement the federal Government’s strategy which is similar to that operating in Sweden to fight the street drug epidemic. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

31  HUMAN RIGHTS IN VIETNAM: Resumption of debate ( from 2 March 1998) on the motion of Mr Filing— That this House calls on the Australian Government to :

(1) condemn the government of Vietnam for its continuing abuses of human rights, especially its persecution of political prisoners; and

(2) exert whatever political, economic and diplomatic pressure is required to encourage the government of Vietnam to work towards democracy and to release all political prisoners. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 9 March 1998. )

 
 
 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS (standing orders 102A and 102C): Presentation and consideration of committee and delegation reports has precedence until 1.15 p.m. each Monday.

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS (standing orders 104 and 101) has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation reports, but commencing no later than 1.15 p.m., being interrupted at 1.45 p.m. and then continuing for 1 hour after the presentation of petitions each Monday.

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for determining the order of precedence and allotting time for debate on consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business. Its determinations for the next sitting Monday are shown under “Business accorded priority for Monday, 9 March 1998”. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority by the Selection Committee on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 104B).