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NOTICES

The Chair of the Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education References Committee (Senator Collins): To move on the next day of sitting—

 (1) That the time for the presentation of the report of the Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education References Committee on regional employment and unemployment be extended to 2 September 1999.

 (2) That the time for the presentation of the report of the Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education References Committee on the effectiveness of education and training programs for indigenous Australians be extended to 21 October 1999.

Senator Bartlett: To move 4 sitting days after today—That Schedule 1 of the Migration Amendment Regulations 1999 (No. 8), as contained in Statutory Rules 1999 No. 132 and made under the Migration Act 1958, be disallowed.

Senator Allison: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

 (a) notes:

  (i) comments by the Director and Operations Manager of Pangea Resources Australia Pty Ltd, Mr Marcis Kurzeme, in the WestAustralian newspaper of 24 August 1999, to the effect that Pangea will abandon its idea to locate an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia if the proposal meets with continued public opposition,


  (ii) the strong concerns expressed by senior Western Australian Government figures, including the Premier (Mr Court), the Deputy Premier (Mr Cowan), and the Minister for the Environment (Ms Edwardes), that foreign nuclear waste should not be stored in Western Australia,

  (iii) the strong commitments expressed by senior Commonwealth Government figures, including the Minister for Industry, Science and Resources (Senator Minchin), that foreign nuclear waste will not be stored in Australia, and

  (iv) that these concerns reflect the broader public opposition across Australia to the proposal; and

 (b) again expresses its fundamental opposition to the proposal by Pangea to situate an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia, or anywhere else within the territories of the Commonwealth of Australia, on the grounds that such a repository poses significant threats to Australia's environment, public safety and sovereignty.

Senator Stott Despoja: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

 (a) notes, with grave concern:

  (i) the findings of a study into student poverty by Associate Professor Sue Turale and Dr Janice Newton of the University of Ballarat's School of Nursing,

  (ii) that these findings showed that student poverty is leading to increased drop-out rates, depression and poor nutrition, and that it is one of Australia's most misunderstood and ignored problems,

  (iii) that in the days before receipt of wages or income support, some students cannot afford food, medicine or transport, and

  (iv) that a number of students live well below the poverty line; and

 (b) urges the Government to:

  (i) address student poverty as a matter of vital importance,

  (ii) raise income support levels for students to sustainable, liveable levels,

  (iii) increase the means test threshold to ensure more students can access income support, and

  (iv) reduce the age of independence for accessing income support to 18 years of age, in line with legal and community standards of independence.

Senator Stott Despoja: To move on the next day of sitting—That the there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Health and Aged Care (Senator Herron), no later than 3 pm on the next day of sitting, the following documents provided for the Australia New Zealand Foods Standards Council:

 (a) Cadmium in Peanuts - Maximum Permitted Concentration (provided for the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Council Meeting, 17 December 1998);

 (b) Development of Joint Australia New Zealand Food Standards as part of the process of Review of the Food Standards Code Draft Policy Document, Dietary Modelling: Principles and Procedures (Australia New Zealand Food Authority, 12 November 1997);


 (c) Inquiry Report. Proposal 144 - Review of the Maximum Permitted Concentrations of Cadmium in Food (provided for the Australia New Zealand Food Authority board meeting, June 1997); and

 (d) the National Health and Medical Research Council's assessment of the Australia New Zealand Food Authority's Dietary Assessment of Cadmium Consumption (provided for the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Council meeting, 3 to 5 August 1999).

Senator Bolkus: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matters be referred to the Environment, Communications, Information Technology and the Arts References Committee for inquiry and report by the first sitting day in April 2000:

 (a) the state of the environment of Gulf St Vincent;

 (b) the expected impacts on that environment; and

 (c) the possible enhancements to protection measures in relation to that environment.

Senator Tierney: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

 (a) notes that:

  (i) Friday, 20 August 1999, marked the 50th anniversary of the first migrant ship, the Fairsea, docking in Newcastle harbour, and

  (ii) the arrival of the 1 896 migrants on the Fairsea from war-torn Europe marked the start of the large post-war boom in migration via the Hunter Valley that did so much to create Australia's multicultural society;

 (b) appreciates the significant hardship and sacrifice made in the 1940s and 1950s by these Australians in their early days of settlement, in the 10 000-strong spartan settlements of Silver City and Chocolate City at Greta in the New South Wales Hunter Valley;

 (c) commends the Minister for Immigration and Multicultural Affairs (Mr Ruddock) for his address on Sunday, 22 August 1999, to the thousand former Greta residents, family and friends of those who journeyed from war-ravaged Europe 50 years ago; and

 (d) joins with the Minister in saluting the substantial contribution that this post-war wave of immigrants, as well as their descendants, have made to the economic growth and cultural enrichment of Australia.

Senator Brown, also on behalf of Senators Bolkus and Greig: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to implement Australia's human rights obligations to children under Articles 37(b) and 40(4) of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Human Rights (Mandatory Sentencing of Juvenile Offenders) Bill 1999.

Senator Hogg: To move on the next day of sitting—

 (1) That the following matters be referred to the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee for inquiry and report by 2 December 1999:

  Whether the proposed sale of Australian Defence Industries Ltd (ADI) to Transfield Thomson-CSF has been conducted with the prudence, discretion, integrity, skill and propriety necessary to:

  (a) protect the value of ADI and its assets;

  (b) realise the maximum price for ADI and its assets; and

  (c) protect Australia's national interest, national security and defence relationships from compromise.


 (2) That, in considering these terms of reference, the committee examine and report on the following issues:

  (a) whether the actions of the Office of Asset Sales and IT Outsourcing, and those of all other parties in the sale process, best served the interests of Australian taxpayers and the broader national interest; and

  (b) any other issues or questions, reasonably relevant to the terms of reference but not referred to above, which have arisen in the course of the inquiry.

Senator Bolkus: To move on the next day of sitting—That, with regard to the current shipment of highly radioactive mixed oxide fuel that will travel past Australia's southern coast through the Tasman Sea en route to Japan, the Senate:

 (a) notes:

  (i) that this may be the first of many such shipments of highly radioactive nuclear fuel or waste which may take this route,

  (ii) that there is no prior notification as to the route these shipments take,

  (iii) that there is a lack of an adequate liability and compensation regime in the event of an accident involving such shipments, and

  (iv) the strong concern of New Zealand and other South Pacific countries regarding these shipments through the Tasman Sea and the South Pacific;

 (b) deplores the Australian Government's effective endorsement of these highly radioactive shipments and its active discouragement of South Pacific countries from pursuing this issue; and

 (c) calls on the Australian Government to:

  (i) revoke its endorsement of shipments of highly radioactive nuclear material through the Tasman Sea and South Pacific,

  (ii) initiate a comprehensive and open scientific study of the potential environmental risks of these shipments,

  (iii) press the governments of Japan, France and the United Kingdom to enter into negotiations with potentially-affected countries to establish an effective system of prior notification and a comprehensive liability regime to cover shipments of highly radioactive material, and

  (iv) join with New Zealand and other South Pacific countries in registering strong concern about these shipments at the Thirtieth South Pacific Forum, to be held in Palau in October 1999.

Senator Stott Despoja: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

 (a) notes:

  (i) the comments of Professor Nadine Strossen, President of the American Civil Liberties Union, that the Government's internet censorship laws are `draconian and repressive', and

  (ii) the specific concerns of Professor Strossen that:

   (A) it is not possible to draw a meaningful and coherent distinction between what should and should not be banned,


   (B) the child protection argument advanced by the Government to support the legislation has previously been rejected by the United States Supreme Court,

   (C) the internet cannot be censored for children without censorship for everybody, and

   (D) the internet censorship legislation is vague and might reflect the values of those enforcing the laws; and

 (b) calls on the Government to repeal the internet censorship legislation.