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Monday, 28 February 2011
Page: 779


Senator Humphries asked the Minister representing the Minister for Health and Ageing, upon notice, on 29 November 2010:

Since 14 September 2010, for each Minister and any Parliamentary Secretaries in their portfolio:

(1)   What has been the total amount spent on stationery and publications, including a breakdown of all spending.

(2)   What has been the total amount spent on printing ministerial letterhead.

(3)   What is the grams per square metre [GSM] of the ministerial letterhead.

(4)   Is the letterhead carbon neutral.


Senator Ludwig (Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry and Minister Assisting the Attorney-General on Queensland Floods Recovery) —The Minister for Health and Ageing has provided the following answer to the honourable senator’s question:

(1)   Since 14 September 2010 to 29 November 2010, the total amount spent on stationery and publications for each Minister and any Parliamentary Secretaries in their portfolio is as follows: - Minister for Health & Ageing: $3105.54. The precise detail requested in the question is not readily available. - Minister for Mental Health & Ageing: $516.20. The precise detail requested in the question is not readily available. - Minister for Indigenous Health: $3161.18. The precise detail requested in the question is not readily available. - Parliamentary Secretary for Health & Ageing: $617.20.The precise detail requested in the question is not readily available.

(2)   No pre-printed Ministerial letterhead is used by the department. Electronic templates are standard practice.

(3)   No pre-printed Ministerial letterhead is used by the department. Electronic templates are standard practice.

(4)   No pre-printed Ministerial letterhead is used by the department. Electronic templates are standard practice.