Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Current HansardDownload Current Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Thursday, 3 December 2015
Page: 14732


Mr WILLIAMS (Hindmarsh) (16:15): I missed the intellectual contribution of new ideas and vision for the future of our nation from the member for Melbourne Ports. I thank the member for Moreton for his comments about integrity because, if we look at the definition of integrity, it is about being honest. To review Labor's track record when they were in government for six years and go through the surplus, the NBN and Defence shipbuilding, let's just examine a few points around what they proposed to do as a government and what they delivered. Were they honest? Did they have integrity? Let's see what the answer will be. Labor delivered a deficit. It was our friend the member for Swan—who has disappeared, not surprisingly, given that he failed to follow through with a surplus that he promised for four years. Even the member for Maribyrnong, now the Leader of the Opposition, said in a 2012 budget media release:

A budget surplus for a strong economy—spreading the benefits of the mining boom to all Australians.

We know from the history that there was no public surplus. There is one myth exposed—and one misleading, deceptive and dishonest statement.

Moving on to the NBN: in 2007, Labor promised a National Broadband Network costing close to $5 billion, to be completed by 2013. What did they do? After six years of Labor, only three per cent of Australians had access to the NBN and fewer than 100,000 homes were using it. They achieved just 16 per cent of the original rollout. What rubbish, what myth, what falsehoods, what dishonesty and what lack of integrity. Onto defence: Labor raided defence, cutting or deferring $16 billion from 2009-10 to 2016-17. Defence is very dear to my heart as a South Australian, and I once again remind the opposition of the commitments to the bring forward the Future Frigate program and the patrol vessels. Let's look at submarines, because I might have heard something about submarines from those opposite. Labor delayed the program to replace the Navy's Collins class submarines by four years, after promising it in 2009. I will read from the 2009 white paper, since Labor like to quote the white paper now and again. Labor said it would:

… double the size of the submarine force [and] replace the current Anzac class frigate with a more capable Future Frigate …

What happened? There was nothing on submarines and nothing on frigates. It took us being in government to do something—to deliver, to bring the projects forward, to deliver jobs—

Mr Perrett: Have you delivered submarines?

Mr WILLIAMS: There will be more to come, Member for Moreton. There will be frigates and patrol vessels—more to come. I have not mentioned Labor's school hall rip-offs or the pink batts disaster—that would be a bridge too far.

Going further to integrity, I want to raise something that the ACTU did to many of my colleagues earlier this year with the China free trade agreement forums. They advertised the forums. They knew that I and other colleagues were unable to attend, but they still advertised them. Why was I unable to attend mine in the electorate of Hindmarsh? I attended a parliamentary employment committee hearing that heard from Group Training Australia, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the New South Wales Business Chamber in Sydney, and it actually heard from United Voice. Where were the Labor members on that day? Do they care about employment? No. There was not just one absent Labor member; the member for Gorton, the member for Kingston and the member for Perth were nowhere to be seen. They showed no interest in employment, but, yes, the whole of the coalition wanted to know about how to make our country better and how to get more people employed. The people up there in the gallery are interested in jobs of the future, they want a vision and we are delivering. I see they are waving their hands, saying, 'Thank God for the coalition. Thank God they are fighting for our country.'

Finally, as we come to the valedictory, let's look at our achievements. They are trade agreements, more jobs and a better future. They are childcare packages—and there are some young mums up in the gallery who will be happy about more affordable, flexible child care. I see their hands raised again—hooray for the coalition! I see small business people up there as well—hooray for the coalition! Infrastructure spending; better roads—thank you to the coalition. Climate change—thank God we are talking about climate change today, unlike Labor, who did not make one mention of it in parliament. It is not even on your radar. Violence against women and domestic violence is something that we have launched into. There is mental health—the list goes on. Please do something, Labor. Go to summer school. Go and learn how to be a government. Do your homework. Look in the mirror and come back a better opposition in 2016.