Save Search

Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Current HansardDownload Current Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Monday, 26 March 2001
Page: 25681


Mr Tanner asked the Minister representing the Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts, upon notice, on 6 February 2001:

(1) Has the Office of Government Online or any other agency within the Minister's portfolio attempted to determine the number of Commonwealth transactions conducted online; if so, with what results.

(2) If available, what are the number of transactions expected in (a) 2000-2001, (b) 2001-2002, (c) 2002-2003 and (d) 2003-2004.

(3) What whole-of-government research or investigation has been undertaken by the Minister's Department, or other Departments where known, of expected savings from the growth of Government online services.

(4) Can details be provided, including savings expected and realised by portfolio, for (a) 2000-2001, (b) 2001-2002, (c) 2002-2003 and (d) 2003-2004.


Mr McGauran (Minister for the Arts and the Centenary of Federation) —The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts has provided the following answer to the honourable member's question:

(1) The National Office for the Information Economy (formerly the Office for Government Online) undertakes regular Government Online surveys of Government agencies as part of the Government Online Strategy to assess levels of online service provision. The survey does not measure the number of “transactions” provided by agencies. However, it does measure the number of “services” provided online. Based on that information, agencies have indicated (as at 30 September 2000) that a total of 1131 services are provided online by Commonwealth agencies. It is emphasised, however, that there is no widely accepted definition used domestically or indeed internationally as to what constitutes an “online service”. The National Office for the Information Economy will continue to work with agencies to ensure a consistent whole-of-government approach for measuring online service provision.

(2) Refer response (1) above. The Government Online Survey also asked agencies to identify future services that will be provided online in order to meet the Government's commitment that all appropriate services be provided online by the end of 2001. Based on this information, agencies have indicated that a further 690 services will be provided online by the end of 2001. The same caveats apply to this estimate as to (1). The survey does not collect information for out years. The National Office for the Information Economy is presently examining options for measuring progress in future years.

(3) A building block of the Government's Online strategy is that the Internet will continue to be embraced by agencies as a mainstream environment when providing information and services. It is the responsibility of each agency to develop further its understanding of the online environment, what the online needs of clients are, what the possibilities are and how best to deliver services. This agency based approach is consistent with the manner in which the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 or the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 places the responsibility for the efficient and effective operations with the agency CEO. Under the Government's Online strategy, agencies are accountable for online service delivery through their respective Online Action Plans. Neither the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts nor the National Office for the Information Economy has compiled information on expected savings from Commonwealth agencies.

(4) See (3) above.