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Tuesday, 4 October 1983
Page: 1312


Mr WELLS(10.55) —It is very hard for me to listen to the simpering inanities of the honourable member for Darling Downs (Mr McVeigh) without making some sort of reply. He referred to the rights of Queenslanders as being respected and acknowledged. A few of them are not. If people go to Queensland hoping for an education their rights will not be respected. Their rights will be delimited by what the Government thinks it is appropriate for them to know-


Mr McVeigh —I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. Is it in order for the honourable member for Petrie to talk with his hand in his pocket?


Mr SPEAKER —Order! There is no point of order.


Mr WELLS —If they wished to have an education their rights would not be respected. If they wished to march in the streets their rights would not be respected. If they wished to cast a democratic vote their rights would not be respected. The honourable member for Darling Downs referred to the faster population growth rate in Queensland. That is one of the very few rights that remains respected in Queensland. He referred to the higher taxes which he said are charged in other States. In fact in the last few years the taxes in States which have Labor governments have gone down whereas in Queensland taxes have been going up. The honourable member for Darling Downs can point in his simpering, incompetent way, to lists of figures which seem to indicate--


Mr Ian Cameron —Mr Speaker--


Mr SPEAKER —The honourable member for Maranoa--


Mr Ian Cameron —Mr Speaker, tourism has been one of the main features of the Bjelke-Petersen Government.


Mr SPEAKER —Order! Had the honourable member for Petrie concluded his remarks? He resumed his seat.


Mr WELLS —No, Mr Speaker. I thought there was a point of order.


Mr SPEAKER —There was no point of order.


Mr WELLS —Mr Speaker, notwithstanding the simian antics of the honourable member for Maranoa--


Mr Ian Cameron —I rise on a point of order, Mr Speaker. I believe you gave me the call. I believe that the Bjelke-Petersen Government in Queensland--


Mr SPEAKER —Order! It was on the understanding that the honourable member for Petrie thought that a point of order was raised. I thought he had concluded. I call the honourable member for Petrie.


Mr Ian Cameron —On a point of order, Mr Speaker; he has concluded. He does not know what he is talking about anyway.


Mr SPEAKER —Order! The honourable member for Maranoa will resume his seat. I call the honourable member for Petrie.


Mr WELLS —Notwithstanding the simian antics of the honourable member for Maranoa , I would like to reply to the points that were made in such a perverse and drivelling way by the honourable member for Darling Downs. He suggests that the State taxes in the southern States are higher than taxes in Queensland. His suggestion missed out on the fact that--


Mr McVeigh —Mr Speaker, I claim to have been misrepresented.


Mr SPEAKER —The honourable member will resume his seat. That is not a point of order. His claim should be made at the appropriate time. I call the honourable member for Petrie.


Mr WELLS —What the honourable member overlooks is the fact that in those southern States taxes have been going down over the last few years particularly under Labor governments, whereas in Queensland the taxes have been going up. The honourable member can produce lists of figures which show that X is higher than Y--


Mr Ian Cameron —I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. The Bjelke-Petersen people can prove that the taxes in Queensland have gone down.


Mr SPEAKER —Order! The honourable member will resume his seat. That is not a point of order. I should warn the honourable member that he can have action taken against him for making frivolous points of order. I call the honourable member for Petrie.


Mr WELLS —Two States in which there have been considerable population increases are Western Australia and Queensland. There has been considerable migration to those States. Of course there has been, because these are the resource rich States. These changes reflect the resource base of this country and the demography of this country. They do not reflect anything whatever about the government of this country. The Government of the State of Queensland is the most breathtakingly incompetent government. These people who posturingly claim that they are capable economic managers are the people who have run the State of Queensland into the direst condition in which it has been for generations. These are the very people who, by trampling upon every democratic right and making a mess of every efficient institution that was established by the previous Labor Government, have benefited from the good fortune consisting totally of the resource richness of the States which they represent.


Mr SPEAKER —Order! The honourable member's time has expired.