Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
The sinking of the Montevideo Maru



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

 

 

Parliament of Australia Department of Parliamentary Services

BACKGROUND NOTE  8 November 2010

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

David Watt  Foreign Affairs, Defence and Security Section 

Contents 

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1 

Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 

Lark Force and Rabaul ......................................................................................................................... 1 

Uncertainty .................................................................................................................................... 3 

Did the Montevideo Maru ever exist? ........................................................................................... 3 

Did the Montevideo Maru really sink? .......................................................................................... 4 

Impact of finding the HMAS Sydney II ................................................................................................ 5 

Montevideo Maru groups ................................................................................................................... 6 

Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee ...................................................................................... 6 

Montevideo Maru Foundation ...................................................................................................... 7 

Rabaul & Montevideo Maru Society ............................................................................................. 7 

Petitions .............................................................................................................................................. 7 

Government responses ....................................................................................................................... 8 

Nominal Roll and other sources........................................................................................................ 10 

Concluding comments ...................................................................................................................... 12 

Further reading ............................................................................................................................ 12 

 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

Introduction  

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru in 1942 and the consequent loss of over 1000 Australian  soldiers and civilians is the greatest loss of Australian lives at sea in war or peace. The concealment  of the facts of the sinking by the Japanese military has led some to doubt the veracity of the  accounts given of the events, and resulted in great uncertainty about who was actually onboard. This  Background Note will outline the history of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru and tell the story of  the search to find the truth about the sinking, and just who was on board the vessel when she went  down.  

Background 

The Montevideo Maru was an unmarked Japanese transport freighter which sank on 1 July 1942  while taking 1051 Australian soldiers and civilian Prisoners of War (POWs) to Hainan Island, which  was then occupied by the Japanese. The Montevideo Maru was torpedoed and sunk in the South  China Sea, approximately 100 km west of the Philippines’ Cape Luzon by the USS Sturgeon, a United  States submarine, captained by Lieutenant Commander William Wright. The ship was torpedoed at  2.29 am and sank stern‐first 11 minutes later. There were no Australian survivors. This was the  biggest single loss of life in Australia’s wartime history, with up to 845 soldiers and 206 civilians  believed to have been locked in the ship’s hold when it sank.1 This number also included the crew of  the Norwegian registered MS Herstein, a cargo vessel which had been destroyed by Japanese  bombers during the invasion of Rabaul. It is accepted that Lieutenant Commander Wright could not  have known its holds were full of people.2  

Lark Force and Rabaul 

Many of the Australians who died were members of Lark Force. 

Garrisoned in Rabaul, on the tip of the eastern province of Papua New Guinea (PNG), Lark Force  consisted of the 2/22nd Battalion AIF (Australian Imperial Force) and supporting units. It comprised  1400 Australian Army soldiers and ‘… represented Australia’s cursory first line of defence in PNG 

                                                             1.  P Walters, ‘Talks in Istanbul on future of WWI sub’, Australian, 28 April 2008, p. 8, viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FNV9Q6%22    D Cooper, ‘Searching for watery graves’, Canberra Times, 12 May 2008, p. 7, viewed on 27 October 2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FI3EQ6%22    S Mann, ‘The last letter home’, Age, 25 April 2008, pp. 21-22, viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2F2K9Q6%22    P Walters, ‘Rudd may fund hunt for ship that went down with 1051 Australians’, Australian, 25 April 2008, p. 6, 

viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2F8F9Q6%22    M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, Canberra Times, 29 March 2008, p. 12, viewed on 27 October  2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FZI0Q6%22  2.  M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, op. cit. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

after Japan entered the war’.3 According to Norm Furness, a former member of Lark Force who has  devoted over 50 years to the cause of gaining recognition for Lark Force:  

We were poorly equipped, mainly with stuff from World War I that had been packed in grease  for 20 years ... we were supposed to be a garrison force and build up the fortress to protect the  base and the airfields, but the extra equipment and reinforcements never came. We had two  field guns and one was cracked ... and our airforce consisted of 10 Wirraways and two Lockheed  bombers â€ trainer planes really. 

… We were supposed to defend 35km of beach with antiquated equipment. If the Japanese  landing parties attracted any flak, they would just go another 500 yards up the beach … I  remember looking in the bay and there were 25 Japanese ships, including two aircraft carriers.4 

The Australian army garrison was inadequate for the task it faced and was quickly overrun by an  estimated 15 000-20 000 Japanese soldiers in January 1942.5 Unfortunately, the garrison was not  reinforced nor was it ordered to withdraw. The difficulties of sending reinforcements by sea and  maintaining the additional forces when they were there meant that the Australian Chiefs of Staff  decided that reinforcements were not possible.6 Much of Australia’s fighting force was still focused  on the war with Germany and this, plus the relentless advance of the Japanese down the Malayan  Peninsula and the resultant fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942, must inevitably have drawn the  attention of the Chiefs of Staff away from the situation in Rabaul. 

Only hours into the invasion, the commanding officer, seeing the futility of the situation, ordered  ‘every man for himself’.7 Approximately 400 Australians fled into the jungle, but many were  subsequently recaptured and over 130 were tortured and killed. About 300 men survived a  punishing trek to avoid capture and returned safely to Australia.8 The rest were taken prisoner and a  few months later were marched from their compound, minus some officers, to a transport ship—the  Montevideo Maru. Before boarding many of the prisoners were allowed to write letters to their  loved ones. These were subsequently airdropped over Port Moresby. According to one witness, the  departing soldiers were ‘… half‐starved and ill ... with a smile and a cheery wave for those remaining,  the stronger supporting the weaker, arm in arm’.9 

                                                             3.   R Brundrett, ‘There were 1400 of us, most of them from Victoria’, Herald Sun, 19 April 2008, p. 6, viewed on  27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FNR7Q6%22  4.   Ibid.  5.   P Dennis et al, The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History, 2

nd  edition, Oxford University Press, Sydney, 

2008, pp. 439-440.  6.   L Wigmore, The Japanese thrust, (Australia in the war of 1939-45), Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1957, p. 396.  7.   S Mann, ‘The last letter home’, op. cit., and R Brundrett, ‘There were 1400 of us, most of them from Victoria’, op. cit.  8.   For a detailed account of this see, L Wigmore, Ordeal on New Britain, Appendix 4 of The Japanese Thrust.  9.   Ibid. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

Uncertainty 

The families of those on the Montevideo Maru, unaware of the ship’s loss, continued to send letters  to their loved ones in the belief they were being held as prisoners of war. It was not until after the  war that families discovered the fate of those lost on the Montevideo Maru.10  

Some have claimed that even after the Japanese were defeated in New Guinea in 1945, the  Australian authorities did little to determine what had happened to the people of Rabaul until the  war ended.11 Norm Furness, the former Lark Force member, says he gave up asking the Government  to search for the ship: 

I’m not writing any more letters. I’ve written to Prime Ministers and Defence Ministers and  Opposition Leaders. I’ve written to local members and look where it’s gotten me.12 

Did the Montevideo Maru ever exist? 

For many years there was speculation as to whether the Montevideo Maru actually existed. Some  believed that the Japanese had actually executed all the POWs and fabricated the sinking in an  attempt to avoid charges of war crimes. While it is generally accepted from the first‐hand accounts  of people on the wharf, that the Montevideo Maru sailed from Rabaul with Australian POWs on  board in July 1942, some descendents continue to resist the official version, believing the Australians  were executed in New Guinea and that the passenger list of the Montevideo Maru was ‘padded’ by  the Japanese in an attempt to conceal war crimes. There is still confusion over the nominal roll,  which was ‘… apparently lost from the national archives after being brought back from Japan by  post‐war investigators’.13 

The Australian War Memorial’s website Remembering 1942: The sinking of the Montevideo Maru, 1  July 1942 includes the transcript of a 2002 talk by historian Ian Hodges in which he described the loss  of the ship and argued that ‘there is little evidence’ to support the theories that the ship did not  exist. In fact, he says, ‘the existence of the ship is beyond doubt’.14 The War Memorial site also  includes a copy of the 6 October 1945 report by Major H.S. Williams, the Australian officer attached  to the Recovered Personnel Division in Tokyo after the end of the war. This report describes the  sinking of the Montevideo Maru and also details the lack of information on POWs from Rabaul  provided by the Japanese during the war. The War Memorial site also has a copy of a list of 

                                                             10.   M Metherell and J Wright, ‘Ship carried 1051 Australians to their death’, Sydney Morning Herald, 26 April 2008, p. 7,  viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FJM9Q6%22 

and M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, op. cit.  11.   M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, op. cit.  12.   R Brundrett, ‘There were 1400 of us, most of them from Victoria’, op. cit.  13.   Ibid. and M Uechtritz, ‘Now it’s the hunt for the Montevideo Maru’, Nine MSN website, 24 April 2008, viewed on 

27 October 2010 http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=452388  14.   I Hodges, ‘Remembering 1942: the sinking of the Montevideo Maru, 1 July 1942’, Transcript of a talk given on 1 July  2002 at the Australian War Memorial, viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/montevideo/transcript.asp 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

passengers believed to have left New Britain on the Montevideo Maru. This list, also dated 6 October  1945, was compiled in New Guinea after the war by two ‘recovered POWs’ then believed to be at  Lae, and contained only 168 names.  

Did the Montevideo Maru really sink? 

Some commentators have suggested that rather than being sunk by the USS Sturgeon, ‘… the ship  indeed left Rabaul on June 22 [1942] with its cargo of prisoners [but] returned empty two days later,  the Japanese having executed them all’.15 These commentators say this alternative scenario is  supported by ‘compelling evidence’—one Rabaul local said the Montevideo Maru, after steaming for  nine days, should have been a long distance from the point where it was thought to have been  sunk.16 Further, the commentators have suggested that the ‘cover‐up theory’ gains further strength  from the accounts of Major Williams:  

Major Williams discovered that the Japanese navy had notified the Prisoner of War Information  Bureau in Tokyo of the loss of the Montevideo Maru in January 1943. But the Information  Bureau failed to pass on the news to Allied authorities as it was obliged to. After pressuring the  Japanese for some time, Major Williams unearthed a list supposedly containing the names of  those on board buried in files in Tokyo in September 1945. Cover‐up theorists regard this as  evidence supporting their belief the Japanese attempted to hide the true fate of the men who  boarded the ship in Rabaul. In the atmosphere of retribution that existed after the war,  Australian military authorities found no evidence to support a war crimes inquiry into the fate of  those captured at Rabaul.17 

According to media reports:  

Only one eyewitness account has ever emerged and then only after 60 years when the sole  surviving Japanese sailor revealed heart‐wrenching details of the “death cries” of trapped  Australians going down with the ship while others sung Auld Lang Syne.18 

This eyewitness, former Japanese sailor Yoshiaki Yamaji, contradicted the post‐war account of the  Australian Government that all prisoners perished at sea, by revealing that he saw dozens of  Australians alive in the water.19 Unfortunately, no evidence appears to exist which would  substantiate this claim. 

                                                             15.   M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, op. cit.  16.   Ibid.  17.   Ibid.  18.   M Uechtritz, ‘Now it’s the hunt for the Montevideo Maru’, op. cit, and M Simkin, ‘Silence broken on Australia’s worst 

maritime disaster’, The 7.30 Report, transcript, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), 6 October 2003, viewed  on 27 October 2010. http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2003/s961016.htm  19.   N Wilson and H Oosedo, ‘Witness raises hope on survivors’, Herald Sun, 28 June 2003, p. 17, viewed on 27 October  2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FSAQ96%22 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

While World War II historian Dr John Knott, of the School of Social Sciences at the Australian  National University, admits that ‘… there is a great deal of mystery surrounding all that happened in  Rabaul from the time the Japanese arrived until the end of the war …’ he nevertheless supports the  official history of the Montevideo Maru.20 

Margaret Reeson, author of A Very Long War: the Families Who Waited, has examined the transport  of POWs from New Guinea and accepts that the likely scenario is that the Montevideo Maru did sink  with over 1050 Australians on board: 

The question of who died on the Montevideo Maru may never be answered…There were a  number of lists of names compiled, some clearly contained names of men who couldn’t have  been on the ship. One of them, for instance, seems to have been a list of the names of the men  in the prison camp at Rabaul.21 

Impact of finding the HMAS Sydney II 

Some commentators have suggested that the discovery of the HMAS Sydney in 2008 has ‘… added to  the sense of loss and abandonment felt by thousands more Australians whose loved ones  disappeared without trace …’ on the Montevideo Maru in 1942 and that ‘… the families of those who  died felt forgotten by their country every time HMAS Sydney was mentioned’.22  

According to an article in the Canberra Times, Associate Professor Mark Staniforth, a maritime  archaeologist from Flinders University has said:  

… $500,000 would buy a base suite of equipment, including multi‐beam echo sounder, sonar  sounder and magnetometer. Marine archaeologists would then be able to locate wrecks in up to  500 metres of water … (including) … the Montevideo Maru.23 

The article suggests that the money spent by the Government on the discovery of the HMAS Sydney  off the coast of Western Australia is ‘… dead money because no infrastructure remains in  Government hands … (as) the technology used to find the ship had to be imported’.24 According to  Professor Staniforth, the Government spends only $400 000 a year to preserve Australia’s 5500  shipwrecks and none of this money is spent on infrastructure.25 

A spokeswoman for the Prime Minister said on 23 April 2008 that the Rudd Government, after  receiving a letter from Sydney historian and Montevideo Maru campaigner Albert Speer would  consider an appeal to provide funds to find the ship: 

                                                             20.   M Hedge, ‘The Montevideo—disaster or cover‐up’, op. cit.  21.   Ibid.  22.   Ibid.  23.   D Cooper, ‘Searching for watery graves’, op. cit.  24.   Ibid.  25.   Ibid. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

The Rudd Government understands the desire of relatives to know the resting place of their  loved ones who tragically lost their lives at sea. 

We will consider all applications on merit. If merit is found, a proposal will then be put forward  to the Government for consideration.26 

Also in April 2008, former Defence Minister Kim Beazley, whose uncle was lost when the Montevideo  Maru went down, said that, given the discovery of the HMAS Sydney, an effort should be made to  find the Montevideo Maru: 

I think it would be a very good thing, given it was Australia’s greatest sea disaster. I don’t think  we have lost as many people at sea before.27 

According to David Mearns, the US shipwreck hunter who led the search for the HMAS Sydney and  the German raider Kormoran, the 3.7 kilometre depth at the site of the Montevideo Maru would not  prohibit a search: 28 

Such a depth is not a barrier to a search like the one we conducted for Sydney. It just ensures  that the expedition will be costly and run into millions of dollars.29 

Montevideo Maru groups  

Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee  

The Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee (MMMC) was set up in early 2009 by relatives of the  men who lost their lives in the sinking. The objectives of the Committee are listed in the first edition  of their newsletter as: 

1. To secure national recognition of the Montevideo Maru tragedy. 

2. To facilitate comfort and closure in the minds of the victims’ relatives. 

3. To locate the nominal roll brought back from Japan that was deposited with Central Army  Records. 

4. To stimulate action to provide greater knowledge of the events that led to Montevideo Maru  tragedy including the official handling of the Rabaul evacuation in January 1942. 

5. To encourage government action to ensure the story of the tragedy is a significant part of  Australia’s social history and to enhance knowledge in the community of the role of and  sacrifices made by Australians in PNG.30 

                                                             26.   M Uechtritz, ‘Now it’s the hunt for the Montevideo Maru’, op. cit. and P Walters, ‘Rudd may fund hunt for ship that  went down with 1051 Australians’, op. cit, and P Walters, ‘Talks in Istanbul on future of WWI sub’, op. cit.  27.   M Metherell and J Wright, ‘Ship carried 1051 Australians to their death’, op. cit.  28.   Ibid.  29.   P Walters, ‘Rudd may fund hunt for ship that went down with 1051 Australians’, op. cit. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

The current patron of the Committee is the Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and  Youth, Peter Garrett, whose grandfather, Tom Garrett, went down with the vessel.31 

Montevideo Maru Foundation  

Another body, the Montevideo Maru Foundation appears to be a recently established, as yet  unincorporated body, whose aim is to help raise awareness of the loss of the Montevideo Maru as  Australia’s worst maritime disaster. Its co‐patrons are the Member for Fadden, Stuart Robert, and  the Member for Moncrieff, Steven Ciobo.  

Rabaul & Montevideo Maru Society 

The Rabaul and Montevideo Maru Society was established to ensure national recognition of the fall  of Rabaul and Australia’s greatest maritime disaster. Its president is Keith Jackson.  

Petitions 

The following petitions on the Montevideo Maru have been presented in the Australian Parliament: 

• 13 October 2003—Steven Ciobo, MP, presented two petitions to the House of Representatives,  one of which was from 473 citizens calling for the House to support any investigations into the  Montevideo Maru. The other petition, signed by 475 citizens, proposed a search to discover the  burial places of servicemen still missing in New Guinea. 

• 16 February 2004—Steven Ciobo, MP, presented a petition to the House of Representatives from  15  citizens  requesting  that  the  House  support  any  investigation  into  the  sinking  of  the  Montevideo Maru. 

• 21 June 2009—Steven Ciobo, MP, presented three petitions to the House of Representatives, one  of which was from 913 citizens calling for the House to support any investigations into the sinking  of the Montevideo Maru. The other petitions, signed by a total of 381 citizens, proposed a search  to discover the burial places of servicemen still missing in New Guinea. 

• 8 February 2010—Julia Irwin MP, presented a petition to the House of Representatives from 239  citizens requesting that the House support any investigation into the identity of the ship thought  to be the Montevideo Maru. 

On 8 April 2010, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Petitions took evidence from  three members of the Montevideo Maru Foundation who submitted that a number of deaths  attributed to the sinking of the Montevideo Maru had not in fact occurred then. The Montevideo 

                                                                                                                                                                                          30.   Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee, The Newsletter, May 2009, viewed 18 December 2009.  http://www.montevideomaru.info/Montevideo/html/Montevideo%20Maru%20Committee/1_May09.pdf  31.   J Huxley, ‘Family connection for Garrett in maritime disaster’, Sydney Morning Herald, 15 December 2009, p. 4, 

viewed 21 June 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FG1HV6%22 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

Maru Foundation told the Committee that it ‘is asking for financial and technical support to identify  the final resting place of several people who were understood to have been buried near Rabaul but  who have been declared lost with the Montevideo Maru’.32 

Albert Speer, former PNG administrator and a Montevideo Maru campaigner would like the  Government to consider funding a search for the ship.33 Mr Speer has written to the Prime Minister  calling for action for ‘the sake of historical truth, certainty and peace of mind of the families’ of the  victims, urging the Government to fund the search for the Montevideo Maru and recover the  captain’s safe, which will presumably contain the passenger manifest: 

The continuing existence of doubts still obscuring truth and causing anguish to all families of  Australians who lost their lives in the Pacific War should be of concern to all Australians. It is  surely the duty of the Australian government to do all in its power to remove those doubts, just  as it has done in other cases no more or less deserving.34 

Cynthia Schmidt, a researcher for the Montevideo Maru Foundation, who directs a campaign to find  missing soldiers killed in South‐East Asia during World War II, has asked the Federal Government to  use the technology utilised to find the HMAS Sydney to search for the Montevideo Maru.35  

Government responses 

On 1 July 2009, the 67th anniversary commemoration of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru, the  Minister for Veterans Affairs, Alan Griffin MP announced some measures the Government was  taking to honour the victims of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru:  

“Today the Australian Ambassador to the Philippines, Mr Rod Smith, will unveil a plaque  commemorating those on board the Montevideo Maru on behalf of the Papua New Guinea  Volunteer Rifles Association at the Hellships Memorial, established in memory of all the ships  that carried POWs,” he said.  

Mr Griffin also confirmed he has approved a $7200 grant to enhance the central plinth at Subic  Bay. “Later in the year, under a grant made by the Australian Government to the RSL Angeles  Sub‐branch in the Philippines, commemoration of the Montevideo Maru at the Hellships  memorial will be further enhanced and an interpretation will be placed in a nearby museum.”  The funds have been granted through the Overseas Privately‐Constructed Memorial Restoration 

                                                             32.   House Of Representatives Standing Committee on Petitions Subcommittee, Reference: Petitions from Queensland,  House of Representatives, Canberra, 8 April 2010, p. 27, viewed 21 June 2010.  http://parlinfo/parlInfo/download/committees/commrep/12842/toc_pdf/7527‐

1.pdf;fileType=application/pdf#search=%22montevideo%20maru%20%20%20|%20EBSCO,AAP%22   33.  P Walters, ‘Rudd may fund hunt for ship that went down with 1051 Australians’, op. cit.  34.   M Uechtritz, ‘Now it’s the hunt for the Montevideo Maru’, op. cit.  35.   J King, ‘Raising secrets from the seabed’, Sydney Morning Herald, 3 April 2008, p. 18, viewed on 27 October 2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FEX1Q6%22 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

Program, which recognises the contribution that organisations around the world make to  honouring Australia’s war time heritage.36 

One of the Australians who attended the commemoration ceremony, Andrea Williams, a member of  the MMMC whose grandfather and great uncle both died on board the vessel, continued to maintain  pressure on the Australian Government to do more to investigate the fate of the Montevideo Maru: 

“There is a fair amount of literature on the Montevideo sinking but there are some nagging  specifics, like why there was no inquiry into the fate of these men,” she said. Australian archives  had several passenger lists but they were inconsistent and there was no passenger manifest, she  said. “What has happened to the nominal roll of the men apparently on board?”37 

However, as the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs told the Sydney Morning Herald at the time:  

... he was not aware of any claims regarding lost documents or a cover‐up”, and there were no  plans to organise a search for the ship. “Through official commemoration and an ongoing  program of publications, the Government recognises and honours those lost on the Montevideo  Maru, bringing the disaster to the nation’s attention.”38 

More recently, in August 2009 the Minister for Defence, John Faulkner, also explicitly rejected any  suggestion that the Australian Government should fund a search for the Montevideo Maru. In  response to a petition sent to him by Julia Irwin MP, Senator Faulkner wrote: 

While the sinking of the Montevideo Maru was a national tragedy, an international search for  the vessel is not possible at this time. Unlike HMAS Sydney II, an Australian vessel located in  Australian waters, the Montevideo Maru is an unflagged vessel and lies in the Philippine  Exclusive Economic Zone. The Australian Government can protect vessels lying in Australian  waters under the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976, but cannot protect vessels lying outside  Australian waters. Regrettably, the Philippine Government does not have similar legislation that  could protect the Montevideo Maru if it were found. 

Any search for the Montevideo Maru would alert shipwreck looters to the possible location of  the wreck, which would threaten the wreck and the remains of those onboard. This would be  unacceptable to the Australian Government, and forms the basis of the decision not to search  for the Montevideo Maru at the present time.39 

                                                             36.   A Griffin (Minister for Veterans Affairs), Remembering Montevideo Maru: our worst maritime disaster, media release,  1 July 2009, viewed 18 December 2009.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressrel%2F6E2U6%22 

37.  I Gridneff, ‘Wartime sea tragedy to be marked’, The Age, 29 June 2009, p. 2, viewed on 27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2F9BZT6%22  38.   J Huxley, ‘Seeking comfort and closure 67 years on’, Sydney Morning Herald, 18 June 2009, p. 7, viewed on  27 October 2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2F8EWT6%22  39.   J Faulkner (Minister for Defence), ‘Procedural text’, House of Representatives Debates, 18 August 2009, p. 8135,  viewed on 27 October 2010. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

10 

However, on 11 November 2009 (Remembrance Day), the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs raised the  possibility of declaring the site an official war grave: 

“I think we all agree now that the detail and the significance of the event have not received  appropriate recognition in the past.” He said the Government would investigate the possibility of  declaring the site of the sinking, off the Philippines, an official war grave, and assist family and  friends in raising funds for a memorial in Canberra. 40 

Media reports stated that the Australian War Memorial would set up a permanent display on the  sinking of the Montevideo Maru and that the Government ‘will renew the search’ for the Japanese  records which contain the names of those who died. There were no details about how the  Government would go about this, but given Senator Faulkner’s comments it would seem that the  close cooperation of the Philippines Government might assist. 

On 21 June 2010 the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs made a Ministerial Statement to the House of  Representatives concerning the Montevideo Maru. The statement did not announce new policy but  set out the facts and fully acknowledged the suffering of the relatives of those people who perished  on the Montevideo Maru:  

As we stand here today, I would like to formally mark the great loss of the Montevideo Maru and  honour those who died. Australia is forever grateful for their service in defence of our nation  during the Second World War. I would especially like to acknowledge the great emotional  suffering of the families and friends they left behind. These people endured many long and  painful years waiting for news of their loved ones and they deserve to be remembered. The  fortitude needed to survive the three years it took for the tragic news of the death of their loved  ones to reach them is exemplary. And I extend to them my wholehearted condolences. Their  experience is an integral part of our wartime history.41 

Nominal Roll and other sources 

As mentioned above, a roll of those persons who had embarked on the Montevideo Maru was  discovered in Tokyo by Major Williams in 1945. The roll was taken by the Japanese at an unspecified  time, but probably well before the Montevideo Maru left Rabaul on its ill‐fated final voyage.42 The 48 

                                                                                                                                                                                          http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009‐08‐ 18%2F0038%22  40.   J Huxley, ‘Greater recognition for Montevideo Maru’, Sydney Morning Herald, 20 November 2009, p. 11, viewed on 

27 October 2010.  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22media%2Fpressclp%2FCZ8V6%22  41.     A Griffin (Minister for Veterans Affairs), ‘Ministerial Statement’, House of Representatives Debates, 21 June 2010, p.  4907, viewed on 27 October 2010. 

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2010‐06‐ 21%2F0063%22  42.   Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee, The Tragedy of the Montevideo Maru: time for recognition: a submission to  the Commonwealth Government, Montevideo Maru Memorial Committee, November 2009, viewed on 27 October 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

11 

page roll was in Katakana (Japanese script) and was partially translated by Major Williams and then  completed in Australia. The roll was then checked against personnel records and this was the basis  on which next of kin were informed of the suspected death of their loved ones. It should be noted  that the process of translation would not have been easy, and given that the Japanese roll was an  attempt to render English names into Katakana in the first place the process of double translation  must give rise to some doubts about the accuracy of parts of the list. 

There is still confusion over the whereabouts of the original roll, which was ‘… apparently lost from  the national archives after being brought back from Japan by post‐war investigators’.43 This  statement reflects what has become received wisdom on this issue but even this is somewhat  confusing. On his website Montevideo Maru, Rod Miller states that it is the original Katakana roll  which is lost and not the English translation.44  

How the roll was lost and what, if anything, has been done to retrieve it has also been something of  a mystery. However, during a meeting of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on  Petitions held in November 2009, Brigadier David Mulhall informed the Committee: 

There is a document called the Katakana roll, which we believe to be the most reliable record of  who may have been on the Montevideo Maru when it was sunk. That document has been  searched for for many years now. We believe that we may have found a copy of it, but right now  we are in the process of trying to verify the authenticity of that document. That is being worked  on actively and we hope to be able to give some advice in due course.45 

In a book entitled Heroes at Sea the late Don Wall published an ‘Honour Roll’ in which he lists the  people who died when the Montevideo Maru went down.46 Unfortunately, Mr Wall does not  provide any information on the provenance of the roll.  

It is possible that Mr Wall derived his information from the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour.  Since this can be searched online by entering the date of death, it is possible to retrieve the names  of Australian military personnel who died on a particular day. A search using 1 July 1942 as the date  of death retrieves 871 names which must, in the main, be the AIF personnel thought to have  perished on the Montevideo Maru. The Montevideo Maru is not mentioned on any of these records,  with place of death listed as ‘At sea (South West Pacific Area)’ and cause of death described as  ‘presumed’. 

                                                                                                                                                                                          2010. http://asopa.typepad.com/files/_submissionfinal‐1.pdf This submission contains, amongst other things, a  concise history of the fall of Rabaul and the sinking of the Montevideo Maru.  43.     M. Uechtritz, ‘Now it’s the hunt for the Montevideo Maru’, op. cit.  44.   R Miller, Montevideo Maru (website), viewed 24 May 2010. http://www.montevideomaru.info/  45.   D Mulhall, evidence to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Petitions, 29 November 2009, viewed 

25 May 2010.    http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22committees%2Fcommrep%2F1161 1%2F0001%22  46.   D Wall, Heroes at Sea, Don Wall, Mona Vale, NSW, 1991, pp. 134-161. 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru  

12 

The War Memorial website has a copy of a list of passengers believed to have left New Britain on the  Montevideo Maru. This list, dated 6 October 1945, was compiled in New Guinea after the war by two  ‘recovered POW’ then believed to be at Lae, and contained only 168 names.47 No explanation is  given as to the method used by the compilers to create the list. 

Concluding comments 

On the balance of evidence, it seems that the story of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru by the  Sturgeon is more likely than not. Given the speed with which the vessel went down it is not  surprising that there were so few survivors from the crew and none at all from those locked below  decks.  

The Katakana roll provides a list of the people most likely to have been on board the Montevideo  Maru but it is not certain that it is accurate or even that all those on the roll actually boarded the  ship. The discovery of the roll and some analysis of it, in addition to any further research that might  be done in the Japanese war archives, may be fruitful, but it might also be that a degree of  uncertainty and doubt will remain.  

Further reading 

The National Archives of Australia holds a number of files with data about individual people thought  to have died on the Montevideo Maru. This can be accessed on the NAA website at  http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/ResearcherScreen.asp. 

There is a memorial to the Montevideo Maru in the POW Memorial at Ballarat and the Australian  War Memorial has a website on the Montevideo Maru at  http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/montevideo/   

 

 

                                                             47.   Passengers in Montevideo Maru, Australian War Memorial website, viewed 24 May 2010,  http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/montevideo/AWM54_10_10.pdf 

The sinking of the Montevideo Maru 

13 

 

 

 

© Commonwealth of Australia 2010 

This work is copyright. Except to the extent of uses permitted by the Copyright Act 1968, no person may reproduce or  transmit any part of this work by any process without the prior written consent of the Parliamentary Librarian. This  requirement does not apply to members of the Parliament of Australia acting in the course of their official duties.  

This work has been prepared to support the work of the Australian Parliament using information available at the time of  production. The views expressed do not reflect an official position of the Parliamentary Library, nor do they constitute  professional legal opinion.  

Feedback is welcome and may be provided to: web.library@aph.gov.au. Any concerns or complaints should be directed to  the Parliamentary Librarian. Parliamentary Library staff are available to discuss the contents of publications with Senators  and Members and their staff. To access this service, clients may contact the author or the Library’s Central Entry Point for  referral.