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Monthly statistical bulletin.



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ISSN 1835-6389

Parliament of Australia Department of Parliamentary Services

The Statistics and Mapping Section produces a selection of the latest economic and social statistics in this Monthly Statistical Bulletin which is updated at the beginning of each month.

As a companion to the Bulletin, longer time series of the statistics presented in the publication are available electronically at Monthly Statistical Bulletin e-data (see Historical Data below). These time series are updated throughout each month as new figures are released, but are only available to Senators and Members through the Parliamentary Library’s intranet.

Note: Between issues, many series are updated or revised. An indication of when each series is likely to be updated is included at the foot of each page. Previous months’ publications should be discarded as they may contain statistics which are no longer the most current or which have been revised.

Related publications Electronic links to publications referred to in the text are available on page 43.

Glossary Some economic and social terms may be unfamiliar to readers. Many of these terms are described in the glossary at the end of this publication.

Enquiries and comments Sue Johnson Director, Statistics and Mapping Section Telephone: (02) 6277 2480 or sue.johnson@aph.gov.au

Monthly statistical bulletin—June 2015

Statistics and Mapping Section

Historical data Long-term data series for every table which appears in this publication are available electronically to all senators and members. These series are updated as new data are released.

The long-term series, with printable tables and graphs, are contained in Excel workbooks and can be found at: http://library/Library_Services/Quicklinks/msb_edata/index.htm.

ii

Key release dates—June 2015

The following are advertised release dates for the statistics that appear in this publication. Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) publications are released at 11.30am (Canberra time). Copies of all ABS publications are available from the ABS website at www.abs.gov.au.

Monday 1 ABS, Building approvals, Australia, April 2015, cat. no. 8731.0 ABS, Overseas arrivals and departures, Australia, January 2015, cat. no. 3401.0 ABS, Business indicators, Australia, March 2015, cat. no. 5676.0

Tuesday 2 ABS, Balance of payments and international investment position, Australia, March 2015, cat. no. 5302.0 Wednesday 3 ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, March 2015, cat. no. 5206.0 Thursday 4 ABS, International trade in goods and services, Australia, April 2015, cat.

no. 5368.0 ABS, Retail trade, Australia, April 2015, cat. no. 8501.0 Tuesday 9 ABS, Housing finance, Australia, April 2015, cat. no. 5609.0 ABS, Building approvals, Australia - additional information, April 2015, cat.

no. 8731.0

Thursday 11 ABS, Labour force, Australia, May 2015, cat. no. 6202.0 Friday 12 ABS, Lending finance, Australia, April 2015 cat. no. 5671.0 Tuesday 16 ABS, Sales of new motor vehicles, Australia, May 2015, cat. no. 9314.0 Thursday 25 ABS, Job vacancies, Australia, May 2015, cat. no. 6354.0

iii

Contents Page

Historical data .................................................................................................................................................................. i

Key release dates .............................................................................................................................................................ii

Contents .......................................................................................................................................................................... iii

Labour market 1.1 Employment .............................................................................................................................................. 1

1.2 Unemployment ......................................................................................................................................... 2

1.3 Labour force .............................................................................................................................................. 3

1.4 Long-term unemployment........................................................................................................................ 4

1.5 Youth unemployment ............................................................................................................................... 5

1.6 ANZ job advertisements............................................................................................................................ 6

1.7 Industrial disputes ..................................................................................................................................... 7

1.8 Jobseekers receiving Newstart Allowance & Youth Allowance (other) .................................................. 8

1.9 Underemployment .................................................................................................................................... 9

Wages and prices 2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings ................................................................................................. 10

2.2 Male total average weekly earnings ....................................................................................................... 11

2.3 Wage price index ..................................................................................................................................... 12

2.4 Consumer price index ............................................................................................................................. 13

2.5 Implicit price deflator for non-farm GDP ............................................................................................... 14

National accounts 3.1 Gross domestic product .......................................................................................................................... 15

3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product ......................................................................................................... 16

3.3 Wages and profits share ......................................................................................................................... 17

3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios ........................................................................................ 18

3.5 Labour productivity ................................................................................................................................. 19

Business conditions 4.1 Turnover of retail establishments .......................................................................................................... 20

4.2 Motor vehicle sales ................................................................................................................................. 21

4.3 Dwelling approvals .................................................................................................................................. 22

4.4 Business investment ............................................................................................................................... 23

4.5 Bankruptcies ............................................................................................................................................ 24

Finance 5.1 Business interest rates ............................................................................................................................ 25

5.2 Housing and cash interest rates ............................................................................................................ 26

5.3 Lending for housing................................................................................................................................. 27

5.4 Home loan affordability .......................................................................................................................... 28

5.5 Stock exchange indexes .......................................................................................................................... 29

External transactions 6.1 International trade in goods and services .............................................................................................. 30

6.2 Balance on current account .................................................................................................................... 31

6.3 Terms of trade ......................................................................................................................................... 32

6.4 Exchange rates ....................................................................................................................................... 33

6.5 Foreign debt ............................................................................................................................................ 34

Demographics 7.1 Population ............................................................................................................................................... 35

7.2 Components of population change ........................................................................................................ 36

7.3 Overseas arrivals—visitors and settlers ................................................................................................. 37

7.4 Health—bulk billing and private health insurance................................................................................. 38

International comparisons 8.1 Economic growth .................................................................................................................................... 39

8.2 Consumer prices...................................................................................................................................... 40

8.3 Unemployment rates .............................................................................................................................. 41

8.4 Long-term interest rates ......................................................................................................................... 42

Related publications—links .................................................................................................................................. 43

Glossary ................................................................................................................................................................. 44

Monthly statistical bulletin

1

1.1 Employment

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Number employed (a) - '000 July 11 017.0 11 210.7 11 351.0 11 462.7 11 556.6

August 11 051.7 11 223.0 11 358.7 11 466.0 11 563.3

September 11 086.1 11 234.6 11 369.4 11 466.4 11 573.4

October 11 118.2 11 244.5 11 383.9 11 465.3 11 588.4

November 11 146.2 11 252.7 11 400.3 11 467.3 11 607.8

December 11 168.0 11 262.8 11 416.6 11 474.0 11 632.0

January 11 182.4 11 276.4 11 430.4 11 485.6 11 659.4

February 11 189.5 11 292.6 11 441.4 11 500.5 11 686.1

March 11 191.6 11 309.3 11 448.9 11 517.1 11 710.2

April 11 191.8 11 324.3 11 453.4 11 533.2 11 731.5

May 11 194.0 11 335.7 11 455.8 11 545.1 11 747.2

June 11 200.7 11 344.1 11 458.7 11 551.9

Annual average 11 144.8 11 275.9 11 414.0 11 494.6

Employment to population ratio (a) - per cent

July 61.9 62.0 61.7 61.2 60.7

August 62.0 62.0 61.7 61.2 60.7

September 62.2 62.0 61.6 61.1 60.6

October 62.3 62.0 61.6 61.0 60.6

November 62.3 61.9 61.6 60.9 60.6

December 62.4 61.9 61.6 60.9 60.7

January 62.4 61.9 61.6 60.8 60.7

February 62.3 61.9 61.6 60.8 60.8

March 62.3 61.8 61.5 60.8 60.8

April 62.2 61.8 61.4 60.8 60.8

May 62.1 61.8 61.4 60.8 60.8

June 62.1 61.8 61.3 60.8

Annual average 62.2 61.9 61.6 60.9

(a) Trend estimates

Update

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6202.0 9 July 2015

60.0

61.0

62.0

63.0

64.0

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14

Employment to Population ratio - per cent What is measured?

The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on employed people aged 15 years and over. A person’s labour force status is based on their experiences during a specific time period.

Generally, a person is considered employed if they worked one or more hours a week for payment or benefit. This includes people who worked without pay in their own, or in a family business. People who were temporarily away from work are still counted as employed. These criteria are consistent with international standards for measuring employment.

The employment to population ratio expresses the number of employed people as a proportion of the civilian population (in the same age group).

Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.2 Unemployment

 1.3 Labour force

 1.9 Underemployment

 7.1 Population

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

2

1.2 Unemployment

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Number unemployed (a) - '000

July 602.1 601.6 622.9 691.6 755.0

August 598.9 608.9 628.7 693.4 763.3

September 597.0 613.5 634.1 696.1 768.3

October 595.3 615.6 638.4 700.5 770.2

November 592.6 615.3 642.7 705.6 770.6

December 589.0 613.7 648.0 710.3 770.0

January 585.5 612.0 654.5 713.7 768.8

February 582.3 611.7 662.1 716.5 766.4

March 580.6 611.6 670.9 720.2 763.2

April 582.3 612.0 679.3 725.7 759.7

May 587.1 614.0 685.3 733.9 756.3

June 593.8 617.9 689.2 744.5

Annual average 590.6 612.3 654.7 712.7

Unemployment rate (a) - per cent

July 5.2 5.1 5.2 5.7 6.1

August 5.1 5.1 5.2 5.7 6.2

September 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.7 6.2

October 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.8 6.2

November 5.0 5.2 5.3 5.8 6.2

December 5.0 5.2 5.4 5.8 6.2

January 5.0 5.1 5.4 5.9 6.2

February 4.9 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.2

March 4.9 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.1

April 4.9 5.1 5.6 5.9 6.1

May 5.0 5.1 5.6 6.0 6.0

June 5.0 5.2 5.7 6.1

Annual average 5.0 5.2 5.4 5.8

(a) Trend estimates

Update

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6202.0 9 July 2015

4.5

5.0

5.5

6.0

6.5

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14

Unemployment rate - per cent

What is measured? The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on unemployed people aged 15 years and over. A person’s labour force status is based on their experiences during a specific time period.

Generally, a person is considered to be unemployed if they are aged 15 years or over, not employed, are actively looking for work and are available to start work. The unemployment rate is the number of unemployed people expressed as a proportion of the labour force.

Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.1 Employment

 1.3 Labour force  1.4 Long-term unemployment

 1.5 Youth unemployment  1.6 ANZ job advertisements

 1.8 Jobseekers receiving allowances  1.9 Underemployment

 8.3 Unemployment rates

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0  ABS, Barriers and incentives to labour

force participation, Cat. no. 6239.0  Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

3

1.3 Labour force

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Labour force (a) - '000 July 11 619.1 11 812.3 11 973.9 12 154.3 12 311.6

August 11 650.6 11 831.9 11 987.4 12 159.4 12 326.5

September 11 683.2 11 848.1 12 003.5 12 162.6 12 341.7

October 11 713.5 11 860.1 12 022.3 12 165.8 12 358.6

November 11 738.8 11 868.1 12 043.0 12 172.9 12 378.4

December 11 757.0 11 876.4 12 064.6 12 184.4 12 402.0

January 11 767.9 11 888.3 12 084.9 12 199.3 12 428.2

February 11 771.9 11 904.2 12 103.6 12 216.9 12 452.5

March 11 772.1 11 921.0 12 119.8 12 237.3 12 473.4

April 11 774.1 11 936.2 12 132.7 12 258.9 12 491.2

May 11 781.1 11 949.7 12 141.1 12 279.0 12 503.5

June 11 794.4 11 962.0 12 147.9 12 296.4

Annual average 11735.3 11888.2 12068.7 12207.3

Participation rate (a) - per cent

July 65.3 65.4 65.1 64.9 64.7

August 65.4 65.4 65.1 64.8 64.7

September 65.5 65.4 65.1 64.8 64.7

October 65.6 65.4 65.1 64.7 64.7

November 65.7 65.3 65.1 64.7 64.7

December 65.7 65.3 65.1 64.6 64.7

January 65.6 65.2 65.1 64.6 64.7

February 65.6 65.2 65.1 64.6 64.7

March 65.5 65.2 65.1 64.6 64.8

April 65.4 65.2 65.1 64.6 64.8

May 65.4 65.1 65.0 64.7 64.8

June 65.4 65.1 65.0 64.7

Annual average 65.5 65.3 65.1 64.7

(a) Trend estimates

Update

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6202.0 9 July 2015

64.0

64.5

65.0

65.5

66.0

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14 Jul-15

Participation rate - per cent What is measured?

The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on Australians aged 15 years and over and their labour force status. People may be employed or unemployed (i.e. in the labour force), or not in the labour force. A person’s status is determined through questions about their experiences during a specific time period. The participation rate measures the size of the labour force and provides an indication of those who are willing and able to work. The rate is the labour force (aged 15 years and over) expressed as a proportion of the civilian population (in the same age group). Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.1 Employment  1.2 Unemployment  1.9 Underemployment  7.1 Population  7.2 Components of population

change

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0  Melbourne Institute, Monthly

bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

4

1.4 Long-term unemployment

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Long-term unemployed (a) (b) - '000 July 112.3 115.7 115.2 132.1 165.6

August 114.2 115.1 117.9 135.8 164.6

September 115.7 114.5 120.5 139.3 164.6

October 116.2 114.0 122.4 142.7 166.4

November 115.5 114.1 122.7 146.3 170.0

December 114.1 114.9 121.4 150.0 175.0

January 112.7 115.9 119.5 153.6 180.0

February 111.8 116.6 118.4 157.1 184.3

March 111.9 116.4 118.9 160.3 187.6

April 113.2 115.3 121.1 163.1 190.3

May 114.7 114.0 124.4 165.3

June 115.7 113.8 128.3 166.1

Annual average 114.0 115.0 120.9 151.0

Ratio (b) - per cent July 18.7 19.2 18.5 19.1 22.0

August 19.1 18.9 18.8 19.6 21.6

September 19.4 18.7 19.0 20.0 21.5

October 19.5 18.5 19.2 20.4 21.6

November 19.5 18.6 19.1 20.7 22.1

December 19.4 18.7 18.8 21.1 22.8

January 19.2 19.0 18.3 21.5 23.4

February 19.2 19.1 17.9 21.9 24.0

March 19.3 19.0 17.7 22.2 24.4

April 19.4 18.8 17.8 22.5 24.8

May 19.5 18.6 18.1 22.5

June 19.5 18.4 18.6 22.3

Annual average 19.3 18.8 18.5 21.2

(a) Unemployed for 52 weeks or more. (b) Trend estimates

Update

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6291.0.55.001 18 June 2015

15.0

17.5

20.0

22.5

25.0

27.5

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14 Jul-15

Ratio - per cent What is measured?

The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on unemployed people aged 15 years and over. A person’s labour force status is based on their experiences during a specific time period.

People who have been unemployed for 52 weeks or more are considered to be long-term unemployed.

The long-term unemployment ratio expresses the number of long-term unemployed people as a proportion of all unemployed people.

When analysing long-term unemployment it is also useful to look at discouraged jobseekers, a group of people not in the labour force. They are people who wanted to work, were available to start work, but were not actively looking for work because they believed they would not find a job.

Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.2 Unemployment

 1.3 Labour force

 1.6 ANZ job advertisements

Related publication  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

 ABS, Persons not in the labour force, Cat. no. 6220.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

5

1.5 Youth unemployment

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Young unemployed (a) (b) - '000 July 241.0 231.2 243.3 252.6 284.9

August 240.5 232.1 243.5 256.1 287.5

September 240.6 233.2 243.8 258.1 288.9

October 240.9 235.0 244.4 258.1 289.2

November 240.8 236.5 245.7 256.3 289.1

December 240.1 237.7 247.3 254.4 288.5

January 239.0 238.5 247.9 254.1 287.7

February 237.3 239.5 247.4 256.5 286.5

March 235.2 240.5 246.3 261.8 285.3

April 233.4 241.4 245.7 268.5 284.1

May 232.2 242.3 246.4 274.9 283.0

June 231.2 243.0 248.9 280.6

Annual average 237.7 237.6 245.9 261.0

Unemployment rate (b) - per cent July 11.6 11.1 11.7 12.2 13.7

August 11.6 11.1 11.8 12.3 13.8

September 11.6 11.2 11.8 12.5 13.9

October 11.6 11.3 11.8 12.5 13.9

November 11.6 11.4 11.9 12.4 13.8

December 11.5 11.5 11.9 12.4 13.8

January 11.4 11.5 12.0 12.4 13.7

February 11.4 11.6 12.0 12.5 13.7

March 11.3 11.6 11.9 12.7 13.6

April 11.2 11.6 11.9 13.0 13.5

May 11.2 11.6 11.9 13.3

June 11.1 11.7 12.0 13.5

Annual average 11.4 11.4 11.9 12.6

(a) People classified as unemployed and aged 15 to 24 years. Update

(b) Trend estimates

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6202.0

9 July 2015

10.5

12.0

13.5

15.0

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14

Unemployment rate - per cent What is measured?

The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on unemployed people aged 15 years and over. A person’s labour force status is based on their experiences during a specific time period.

Young unemployed people are those classified as unemployed and aged 15 to 24 years. The youth unemployment rate expresses the number of young unemployed people as a proportion of the youth labour force (in the same age group).

The Parliamentary Library’s Small Area Labour Market Data webpage provides regional estimates of youth unemployment.

Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published. Estimates for regional areas are available from October 1998.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.2 Unemployment

 1.4 Long-term unemployment

 1.6 ANZ job advertisements

 1.8 Jobseekers receiving allowances

 1.9 Underemployment

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

 ABS, Job Search Experience, Cat. no. 6222.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

6

1.6 ANZ job advertisements

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Advertisements (a) (b) - number July 164 833 172 377 156 657 128 155 133 625

August 168 111 171 352 153 167 127 265 134 833

September 171 766 170 241 149 291 126 716 136 396

October 175 138 169 171 145 490 126 424 137 962

November 177 993 168 090 142 190 126 627 139 303

December 179 756 167 069 139 637 127 315 140 399

January 180 103 166 265 137 786 128 309 141 459

February 179 225 165 388 136 345 129 380 142 409

March 177 664 164 367 134 889 130 370 143 246

April 175 948 163 169 133 160 131 247 143 969

May 174 457 161 631 131 259 132 010 144 517

June 173 326 159 507 129 494 132 741

Annual average 174 860 166 552 140 780 128 880

Annual change (b) - per cent July 35.0 4.6 -9.1 -18.2 4.3

August 36.9 1.9 -10.6 -16.9 5.9

September 37.9 -0.9 -12.3 -15.1 7.6

October 37.5 -3.4 -14.0 -13.1 9.1

November 35.9 -5.6 -15.4 -10.9 10.0

December 32.9 -7.1 -16.4 -8.8 10.3

January 28.7 -7.7 -17.1 -6.9 10.2

February 23.5 -7.7 -17.6 -5.1 10.1

March 18.2 -7.5 -17.9 -3.4 9.9

April 13.6 -7.3 -18.4 -1.4 9.7

May 9.8 -7.4 -18.8 0.6 9.5

June 7.0 -8.0 -18.8 2.5

Annual average 26 - 5 - 16 - 8

(a) Average total number of newspaper and internet job advertisements per week. Update (b) Trend estimates

Source: ANZ Banking Group, Job advertisements series

6 July 2015

100 000

120 000

140 000

160 000

180 000

200 000

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14 Jul-15

Total number What is measured?

The ANZ job advertisement series measures the average weekly number of job advertisements in major metropolitan newspapers and on the internet. These figures are available monthly since January 1975 for newspapers and since July 1999 for the internet.

Note: ANZ job advertisements data are revised monthly.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.1 Employment  1.2 Unemployment

 1.3 Labour force  1.4 Long-term unemployment

 1.8 Jobseekers receiving allowances  1.9 Underemployment

Related publications  ABS, Job vacancies, Cat. no. 6354.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

7

1.7 Industrial disputes

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Working days lost - '000 September 46.6 101.3 110.0 23.0 24.6

December 27.2 54.3 25.7 36.1 16.9

March 19.7 35.8 52.1 9.7 20.4

June 66.2 101.7 19.8 20.2

Annual (a) 159.8 293.1 207.6 88.9

Working days lost per '000 employees September 4.7 10.1 10.8 2.2 2.4

December 2.7 5.3 2.5 3.5 1.6

March 2.0 3.5 5.0 0.9 1.9

June 6.5 9.9 1.9 1.9

Update

(a) 12 months ended June.

Source: ABS, Industrial disputes , Cat. no. 6321.0.55.001

3 September 2015

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

Sep-11 Sep-12 Sep-13 Sep-14 Sep-15

Days lost per '000 employees What is measured?

The ABS provides industrial disputes data for all disputes where ten or more working days were lost. Disputes where fewer working days were lost are excluded.

To be included, industrial disputes must be unauthorised stop work meetings; general strikes; sympathetic strikes; political or protest strikes; rotating or revolving strikes; unofficial strikes; or work stoppages initiated by employers.

Work-to-rules, go-slows and bans such as overtime bans are excluded.

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

 ABS, Employee earnings, benefits and trade union membership, Cat. no. 6310.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

8

1.8 Jobseekers receiving allowances

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (other) recipients (a) - '000 July 338.8 314.6 339.3 411.5 413.9

August 319.6 304.0 330.8 394.0 403.0

September 310.2 299.5 330.4 384.5 399.3

October 302.9 297.8 332.9 384.0 398.8

November 298.0 296.1 335.4 385.2 397.2

December 318.5 317.2 349.8 406.7 421.2

January 336.3 335.7 404.6 428.2 437.7

February 340.8 339.5 405.7 425.6 440.0

March 324.9 332.9 385.1 417.5 431.1

April 319.7 332.4 394.9 415.5 435.9

May 317.7 330.7 400.5 417.6

June 315.6 332.0 406.8 417.3

Annual average -14.8 -0.3 15.2 10.7

Annual change - per cent July -20.8 -7.1 .. 21.3 0.6

August -20.0 -4.9 .. 19.1 2.3

September -20.0 -3.5 .. 16.4 3.9

October -19.4 -1.7 .. 15.3 3.9

November -18.6 -0.6 .. 14.8 3.1

December -15.7 -0.4 .. 16.3 3.6

January -13.6 -0.2 .. 5.8 2.2

February -10.4 -0.4 .. 4.9 3.4

March -11.0 2.5 .. 8.4 3.3

April -9.8 4.0 .. 5.2 4.9

May -8.2 4.1 .. 4.3

June -7.4 5.2 .. 2.6

Annual average -14.8 -0.3 15.2 10.7

(a) Includes jobseekers receiving Youth Allowance (other).

Update 24 June 2015 Source: Department of Social Services, Labour market and related payments: a monthly profile

100

125

150

175

200

225

250

275

300

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Persons '000

Short-term allowance recipients

Long-term allowance recipients

What is measured? The Department of Social Services produces regular data on various labour market related payments delivered by Centrelink. The jobseekers data provides information on people receiving Newstart Allowance and those receiving Youth Allowance who are not full-time students or full-time apprentices. Newstart Allowance is paid to eligible unemployed people aged 22 years and over (in July 2012 eligibility changed from 21 years), but below the Age Pension age. These people are subject to the activity test and must be actively seeking and willing to work, or be actively improving their prospects of becoming employed. Youth Allowance has replaced Austudy, some categories of Newstart Allowance, Youth Training Allowance, Sickness Allowance and parts of the Family Payment. People classified as ‘Youth Allowance (other)’ are those who would usually be engaged in job search. Note: there have been several breaks in the time series, including at July 2012, therefore caution should be used when comparing figures before and after these periods. For this reason, annual percentage change figures have not been included for some timeframes. There was also a large one-off increase to the number of Newstart Allowance recipients in January 2013 due to the cessation of some Parenting Payments.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.2 Unemployment  1.4 Long-term unemployment  1.5 Youth unemployment  1.6 ANZ job advertisements

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

9

1.9 Underemployment

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Number underemployed (a) - '000 August 835.9 837.1 864.3 930.3 1011.9

November 833.7 857.8 860.9 938.9 1044.1

February 828.5 872.9 878.9 944.0 1060.0

May 825.0 874.6 908.0 969.8 1061.8

Annual average 830.8 860.6 878.0 945.7 1044.4

Underemployment rate (a) - per cent August 7.2 7.1 7.2 7.6 8.2

November 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.7 8.4

February 7.0 7.3 7.3 7.7 8.5

May 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.9 8.5

Annual average 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.7 8.4

Labour force underutilisation rate (a) - per cent August 12.4 12.3 12.5 13.5 14.4

November 12.2 12.5 12.5 13.6 14.7

February 12.1 12.6 12.7 13.6 14.8

May 12.1 12.6 13.2 13.9 14.7

Annual average 12.2 12.5 12.7 13.6 14.6

(a) Trend estimates

Update

Source: ABS, Labour force , Cat. no. 6202.0 10 September 2015

5.0

7.0

9.0

11.0

13.0

15.0

17.0

Feb-11 Feb-12 Feb-13 Feb-14 Feb-15

Per cent Labour force underutilisation rate

Underemployment rate

What is measured? The ABS labour force survey provides regular data on Australians aged 15 years and over and their labour force status. A person’s status is determined through questions about their experiences during a specific time period.

Generally, a person is considered to be underemployed if they were: employed part-time and wanted to work more hours and were available to do so; or employed full-time but only working part-time hours due to economic reasons (e.g. being stood down).

The underemployment rate expresses the number of underemployed people as a proportion of the labour force. The underutilisation rate is an extended measure of underutilised labour, which includes the unemployed and expresses the sum of these two groups as a proportion of the labour force.

Note: From January 2014 the ABS is producing labour force estimates based on 2011 Census population benchmarks. Estimates from July 1991 to December 2013 have been rebenchmarked, and therefore may vary to those previously published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.1 Employment

 1.2 Unemployment

 1.3 Labour force

 1.5 Youth unemployment

 1.6 ANZ job advertisements

Related publications  ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

 ABS, Underemployed workers, Cat. no. 6265.0

 ABS, Barriers and incentives to labour force participation, Cat. no. 6239.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

10

2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

AWOTE - $ per week

November 1328.5 1390.5 1458.0 1500.1 1542.4

May 1357.9 1413.1 1482.5 1515.8

Annual average 1343.2 1401.8 1470.3 1508.0

AWOTE annual change - per cent

November 4.1 4.7 4.9 2.9 2.8

May 4.4 4.1 4.9 2.2

Annual average 4.2 4.4 4.9 2.6

Real AWOTE (a) - $ per week

November 1451.9 1475.5 1513.7 1515.8 1532.3

May 1449.6 1490.5 1527.2 1515.8

Annual average 1450.8 1483.0 1520.5 1515.8

Real AWOTE annual change - per cent

November 1.3 1.6 2.6 0.1 1.1

May 0.9 2.8 2.5 -0.7

Annual average 1.1 2.2 2.5 -0.3 1.1

Sources: ABS, Average weekly earnings, Cat. no. 6302.0

ABS, Consumer price index, Cat. no. 6401.0

Update

13 August 2015

(a) Expressed in June 2014 dollars; converted to real terms using the consumer price index.

1 300

1 350

1 400

1 450

1 500

1 550

1 600

Nov-10 Nov-11 Nov-12 Nov-13 Nov-14 Nov-15

Dollars

AWOTE

Real AWOTE (June 2014 dollars)

What is measured? Average weekly ordinary time earnings is a measure of before tax earnings of full-time adult employees; it excludes any overtime payments. It is calculated by dividing an estimate of gross—before deductions—weekly earnings by the number of employees. AWOTE has been measured since December 1983. AWOTE has become a standard measure for wage levels and is enshrined in some legislation as a benchmark for the calculation of some social security payments. To gauge how earnings are changing in comparison with inflation, the inflationary component is removed using the consumer price index; this leaves the real AWOTE series.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.2 Male total average weekly earnings  2.3 Wage price index  2.4 Consumer price index  3.3 Wages and profits share

Related publications  ABS, Employee earnings and hours, Cat. no. 6306.0  ABS, Employee earnings, benefits

and trade union membership, Cat. no. 6310.0  ABS, Labour price index, Cat. no. 6345.0  ABS, Australian national accounts:

national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

11

2.2 Male total average weekly earnings

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

MTAWE - $ per week

November 1 211 1 255 1 324 1 348 1 372

May 1 237 1 285 1 357 1 365

Annual average 1 224 1 270 1 341 1 356

MTAWE annual change - per cent

November 4.1 3.6 5.5 1.8 1.8

May 4.5 3.9 5.6 0.6

Annual average 4.3 3.8 5.5 1.2

Real MTAWE (a) - $ per week

November 1 323 1 332 1 375 1 362 1 362

May 1 320 1 355 1 398 1 365

Annual average 1 322 1 344 1 386 1 363

Real MTAWE annual change - per cent

November 1.4 0.6 3.2 -0.9 0.0

May 0.9 2.7 3.1 -2.4

Annual average 1.1 1.7 3.2 -1.6

Sources: ABS, Average weekly earnings , Cat. no. 6302.0

ABS, Consumer price index , Cat. no. 6401.0

Update

13 August 2015

(a) Expressed in June 2014 dollars; converted to real terms using the consumer price index.

1 150

1 200

1 250

1 300

1 350

1 400

1 450

1 500

Nov-10 Nov-11 Nov-12 Nov-13 Nov-14 Nov-15

Dollars

MTAWE

Real MTAWE (June 2014 dollars)

What is measured? Male total average weekly earnings (MTAWE) is a measure of average before tax earnings of all male employees including any overtime payments. It is calculated by dividing an estimate of male gross—before deductions—weekly total earnings by the number of male employees. MTAWE, like AWOTE, is a standard measure for wage levels and is enshrined in a range of legislation. For example, MTAWE is used as a benchmark in setting pensions. MTAWE is used to compare changes in wages over long periods; MTAWE is available from 1963. To gauge increase in earnings in comparison with inflation, the inflationary component is removed using the consumer price index; this leaves the real MTAWE series.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings  2.3 Wage price index  2.4 Consumer price index  3.3 Wages and profits share

Related publications  ABS, Employee earnings and hours, Cat. no. 6306.0  ABS, Employee earnings, benefits

and trade union membership, Cat. no. 6310.0  ABS, Labour price index, Cat. no. 6345.0  ABS, Australian national accounts:

national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

12

2.3 Wage price index

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Wage price index (a) (b) - index

September 105.5 109.4 113.4 116.5 119.4

December 106.6 110.4 114.2 117.2 120.1

March 107.5 111.5 115.0 118.0 120.7

June 108.5 112.4 115.7 118.7

Annual average 107.0 110.9 114.6 117.6

Quarterly change (b) - per cent

September 1.0 0.8 0.9 0.7 0.6

December 1.0 0.9 0.7 0.6 0.6

March 0.8 1.0 0.7 0.7 0.5

June 0.9 0.8 0.6 0.6

Annual change (b) - per cent

September 3.6 3.7 3.7 2.7 2.5

December 3.9 3.6 3.4 2.6 2.5

March 3.9 3.7 3.1 2.6 2.3

June 3.8 3.6 2.9 2.6

Annual average 3.8 3.6 3.3 2.6

(a) Total hourly rate of pay excluding bonuses, all sectors. Index base: 2008-09 = 100.0. (b) Quarterly figures are seasonally adjusted.

Source: ABS, Wage Price Index, Australia, Cat. no. 6345.0

Update

Note: Prior to September quarter 2012, this publication was known as Labour Price Index . The catalogue number (6345.0) remains unchanged.

12 August 2015

2.3

2.5

2.8

3.0

3.3

3.5

3.8

4.0

Jun-10 Jun-11 Jun-12 Jun-13 Jun-14 Jun-14

Annual change - per cent

What is measured? The wage price index is to wage costs what the consumer price index is to the costs of consumer goods and services. It is calculated by comparing the cost of wages over time for the same work level and output. This means that it excludes the effects of changes in the nature of work performed, the quantity of work performed, the characteristics of the particular occupation and the location of work. The wage price index is available from the September quarter 1997.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings

 2.2 Male total average weekly earnings

 2.4 Consumer price index

 3.3 Wages and profits share

Related publications  ABS, Employee earnings and hours, Cat. no. 6306.0

 ABS, Employee earnings, benefits and trade union membership, Cat. no. 6310.0

 ABS, Average weekly earnings, Cat. no. 6302.0

 ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

13

2.4 Consumer price index

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Consumer price index (a) September 96.5 99.8 101.8 104.0 106.4

December 96.9 99.8 102.0 104.8 106.6

March 98.3 99.9 102.4 105.4

June 99.2 100.4 102.8 105.9

Annual average 97.7 100.0 102.3 105.0

Consumer price index quarterly change - per cent September 0.7 0.6 1.4 1.2 0.5

December 0.4 0.0 0.2 0.8 0.2

March 1.4 0.1 0.4 0.6

June 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.5

Consumer price index annual change (b) - per cent September 2.9 3.4 2.0 2.2 2.3

December 2.8 3.0 2.2 2.7 1.7

March 3.3 1.6 2.5 2.9

June 3.5 1.2 2.4 3.0

Underlying inflation annual change (c) - per cent September 2.7 2.6 2.3 2.3 2.5

December 2.4 2.7 2.3 2.6 2.3

March 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.7

June 2.8 1.9 2.4 2.8

(a) All groups, eight capital cities index. Base: 2011-12 = 100.0. (b) Referred to as the 'headline' inflation rate. (c) The average of the Reserve Bank of Australia weighted median and trimmed

mean price inflation measures. Referred to as the 'underlying' inflation rate.

Source:

ABS, Consumer price index, Cat. no. 6401.0 Update

RBA, Statistical Tables, Prices and Inflation 22 July 2015

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

3.5

4.0

4.5

Jun-10 Jun-11 Jun-12 Jun-13 Jun-14 Jun-15

Annual change - per cent

Headline rate Underlying rate

RBA Target range

What is measured? The consumer price index (CPI) measures the relative cost of a basket of goods and services bought by capital city households. The basket is regularly updated to incorporate changes in the composition of purchases and linked so a constant comparable measure of consumer price inflation is available from 1948. Changes in the CPI are called ‘headline’ inflation.

The CPI forms a base for measures of price change used by the RBA, the ‘trimmed mean’ and the ‘weighted median’. These smooth the volatility of some price changes to give what are called ‘underlying’ or ‘core’ inflation measures.

The RBA inflation target of 2-3 per cent is a medium-term average for ‘underlying’ inflation rather than a rate that must be held at all times.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.3 Wage price index

 2.5 Implicit price deflator for non-farm GDP

 8.2 Consumer prices

Related publications  ABS, Information paper: Introduction of the 16 th

series

Australian Consumer Price Index, Cat. no. 6470.0.

 ABS, A guide to the consumer price index, Cat. no. 6440.0

 ABS, Consumer price index: concepts, sources and methods, Cat. no. 6461.0

 ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

 Melbourne Institute, Survey of consumer inflationary expectations

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

14

2.5 Implicit price deflator for non-farm GDP

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Index (a) (b) September 97.2 101.2 99.7 101.1 100.9

December 97.7 100.1 99.4 101.9 101.1

March 98.9 99.8 100.0 101.9 100.4

June 100.4 100.3 100.8 101.3

Annual average 98.6 100.4 100.0 101.5

Quarterly change (b) - per cent September 1.0 0.8 -0.6 0.3 -0.4

December 0.5 -1.1 -0.3 0.8 0.2

March 1.2 -0.3 0.6 0.0 -0.7

June 1.5 0.5 0.8 -0.6

Annual change (b) - per cent September 7.5 4.1 -1.5 1.4 -0.2

December 6.4 2.5 -0.7 2.5 -0.8

March 6.0 0.9 0.2 1.9 -1.5

June 4.4 -0.1 0.5 0.5

Annual average 6.1 1.8 -0.4 1.5

(a) Ratio of current price non-farm gross domestic product to chain volume non-farm gross domestic product. Base: 2012-13 = 100.0. (b) Quarterly figures are seasonally adjusted.

Source: ABS, Australian national accounts: National income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

Update

2 September 2015

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

Jun-10 Jun-11 Jun-12 Jun-13 Jun-14 Jun-15

Annual change - per cent

What is measured? The implicit price deflator (IPD) for non-farm gross domestic product is used to measure price changes throughout the wider economy, much as the consumer price index measures price changes for consumer goods and services in the capital cities.

Ideally, the IDP for GDP would be used but the volatility in the farm sector—agriculture, forestry and fishing—often distorts the IPD. Therefore, even though the farm sector only accounts for around 3 per cent of GDP, it is excluded so a more stable measure of price change is achieved.

The measure is called an implicit price deflator because it is calculated, or implied, from current price and chain volume measures series.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.3 Wage price index

 2.4 Consumer price index

 3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

Related publications  ABS, Labour price index, Cat. no. 6345.0

 ABS, Consumer price index, Cat. no. 6401.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

15

3.1 Gross domestic product

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Current prices (a) - $ million

September 343 520 367 346 376 557 390 148 400 320

December 348 911 370 795 378 237 394 874 401 565

March 354 806 372 866 380 963 398 120 403 194

June 361 758 374 856 385 190 399 626

Annual (b) 1 407 865 1 488 029 1 520 944 1 581 974

Chain volume measures (c) - $ million

September 354 551 365 320 377 517 385 259 395 565

December 356 382 369 584 379 262 388 269 397 689

March 358 404 372 874 381 022 391 300 400 039

June 361 313 375 525 382 868 393 684

Quarterly change (from previous quarter) (d) - per cent

September 0.6 1.1 0.5 0.6 0.5

December 0.5 1.2 0.5 0.8 0.5

March 0.6 0.9 0.5 0.8 0.6

June 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.6

Change from same quarter of previous year (d) - per cent

September 2.2 3.0 3.3 2.1 2.7

December 2.2 3.7 2.6 2.4 2.4

March 2.3 4.0 2.2 2.7 2.2

June 2.5 3.9 2.0 2.8

Update 2 September 2015

(a) Calculated on the trend series using current prices.

(c) Calculated on the trend series using chain volume measures. Reference year for chain volume measures is 2012-13. Chain volume measures are generally not additive.

Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product , Cat. no. 5206.0

(b) 12 months ended June. Calculated on the quarterly original series using current prices.

(d) Calculated on the trend series using chain volume measures.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Annual change - per cent (d)

What is measured? Gross domestic product (GDP) measures the total market value of goods and services produced in Australia within a given period after deducting the cost of goods and services used up in the process of production but before deducting allowances for the consumption of fixed capital.

GDP is a measure of the size of the economy and is expressed in current prices or chain volume measures (where the effects of price change are removed).

Three measures of GDP are produced each quarter. They are a production measure, an income measure and an expenditure measure. The GDP figures shown in this table are the headline figures, and are the average of the three measures.

From October 2014, seasonally adjusted estimates have been replaced with trend estimates.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 3.5 Labour productivity

 8.1 Economic growth

Related publications  Treasury, Budget papers

 Treasury, Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook

 OECD, Economic Outlook

 NAB, Business Research and Insights

 Deloitte Access Economics, Business Outlook

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly Bulletin of Economic Trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

16

3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Current prices (a) - $ million

September 336 923 359 878 369 036 381 815 391 749

December 341 902 363 388 370 565 386 470 392 834

March 347 515 365 479 373 092 389 677 394 274

June 354 311 367 445 377 040 391 164

Annual (b) 1 379 417 1 458 318 1 489 839 1 548 211

Chain volume prices (c)- $ million

September 347 117 357 467 369 955 376 829 387 529

December 348 718 361 745 371 715 379 834 389 629

March 350 588 365 062 373 212 383 017 392 004

June 353 450 367 797 374 680 385 573

Quarterly change (from previous quarter) (d) - per cent

September 0.5 1.1 0.6 0.6 0.5

December 0.5 1.2 0.5 0.8 0.5

March 0.5 0.9 0.4 0.8 0.6

June 0.8 0.7 0.4 0.7

Change from same quarter of previous year (d) - per cent

September 2.3 3.0 3.5 1.9 2.8

December 2.2 3.7 2.8 2.2 2.6

March 2.2 4.1 2.2 2.6 2.3

June 2.4 4.1 1.9 2.9

(a) Calculated on the trend series using current prices.

(d) Calculated on the trend series using chain volume measures.

Update 2 September 2015 Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product , Cat. no. 5206.0

(b) 12 months ended June. Calculated on the quarterly original series using current prices.

(c) Calculated on the trend series using chain volume measures. Reference year for chain volume measures is 2012-13. Chain volume measures are generally not additive.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Change in GDP from same quarter of previous year- per cent (d) What is measured? GDP measures the total market value of goods and services produced in Australia within a given period after deducting the cost of goods and services used up in the process of production but before deducting allowances for the consumption of fixed capital.

GDP is a measure of the size of the economy and is expressed in current prices or chain volume measures (where the effects of price change are removed).

GDP can be split into farm GDP and non-farm GDP for analysis purposes. Farm GDP can be very volatile, for example, due to the effects of weather. Non-farm GDP is often used because it is a more stable indicator.

From October 2014, seasonally adjusted estimates have been replaced with trend estimates.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.5 Implicit price deflator for non-farm GDP

 3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 3.5 Labour productivity

 8.1 Economic growth

Related publications  Treasury, Budget papers

 Treasury, Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook

 OECD, Economic Outlook

 NAB, Business Research and Insights

Monthly statistical bulletin

17

3.3 Wages and profits share

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Wage share (a) (b) - per cent

September 52.2 52.3 53.7 53.1 53.2

December 52.4 52.7 53.6 52.9 53.2

March 52.6 53.3 53.5 52.8 53.1

June 52.4 53.7 53.3 53.0

Annual average (c) 52.4 53.0 53.5 53.0

Profit share (a) (d) - per cent

September 28.5 28.6 26.5 26.8 26.5

December 28.1 28.3 26.3 27.1 26.4

March 28.1 27.6 26.3 27.1 26.4

June 28.4 26.9 26.5 26.8

Annual average (c) 28.3 27.9 26.4 27.0

(a) Calculated on the trend series using current prices. (b) Compensation of employees as a proportion of total factor income. (c ) Year ending June.

Update

(d) Gross operating surplus of corporations as a proportion of total factor income.

Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product , Cat. no. 5206.0

2 September 2015

What is measured? Gross Domestic Product can be derived from income flows to the factors of production (labour and capital).

The income measure of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) can be broken down into ‘total factor income’ plus taxes less subsidies.

‘Total factor income’ is that part of the cost of producing GDP which consists of gross payments to labour and capital.

The ‘wage share’ is the total compensation of employees as a percentage of total factor income.

The ‘profit share’ is the Gross Operating Surplus (GOS) of corporations as a percentage of total factor income. GOS is a measure of the surplus accruing to owners of capital from processes of production.

From October 2014, seasonally adjusted estimates have been replaced with trend estimates.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 3.5 Labour productivity

Related publications  Treasury, Budget papers

 OECD, Economic Outlook

 NAB, Business Research and Insights

 Deloitte Access Economics, Business Outlook

51.0

51.5

52.0

52.5

53.0

53.5

54.0

25

25

26

26

27

27

28

28

29

29

30

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Profit share (left axis)

Wages share (right axis)

Per cent Per cent

Monthly statistical bulletin

18

3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Household debt ratio (a) - per cent September 150.6 146.5 145.9 149.3 152.7

December 149.5 146.0 146.7 150.1 153.8

March 148.4 146.0 147.4 151.0

June 147.5 145.2 148.7 151.9

Household debt servicing ratio (b) - per cent September 11.0 11.0 10.1 9.1 8.9

December 11.2 10.7 9.8 8.9 8.9

March 11.2 10.5 9.5 8.9

June 11.2 10.1 9.4 8.9

Household saving ratio (c) - per cent September 9.5 11.2 9.4 9.8 9.3

December 10.7 11.6 10.0 9.8 9.0

March 10.8 10.4 11.1 9.7

June 9.9 11.7 10.4 9.5

Annual average (d) 10.2 11.2 10.2 9.7

(b ) Calculated by the RBA using seasonally adjusted data. (c) Seasonally adjusted. (d) Year ending June.

Sources: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product, Cat. no. 5206.0 (for the household saving ratio). Reserve Bank of Australia, Statistics Tables, Household and Business Finances (Table E2) Update for the household debt and debt servicing ratios. 3 June 2015 (Savings ratio)

(a) Calculated by the RBA using original (for debt) and seasonally adjusted (for household income) data.

Last business Friday of April 2015 (Debt ratios)

What is measured? The household debt ratio measures housing and other personal debt, as a proportion of annualised household disposable income. The household debt servicing ratio measures interest payments on housing and other personal debt as a proportion of quarterly household disposable income. The household saving ratio is the ratio of household net saving to household net disposable income. Housing net saving is calculated as household net disposable income less household final consumption expenditure. Household net disposable income is calculated as household gross disposable income less household consumption of fixed capital. Caution should be exercised when interpreting the household saving ratio, as major components of household income and expenditure may be subject to significant revisions.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product  3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share  5.4 Home loan affordability

Related publications  Treasury, Budget papers  OECD, Economic Outlook  NAB, Business Research and

Insights  Deloitte Access Economics, Business Outlook

140.0

142.0

144.0

146.0

148.0

150.0

152.0

154.0

156.0

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Household savings ratio (left axis) Household debt servicing ratio (left axis) Household debt ratio (right axis)

Per cent Per cent

Monthly statistical bulleti n

19

3.5 Labour productivity

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Labour productivity index (a) (b)

September 93.0 95.1 99.2 101.2 102.3

December 92.7 96.1 99.9 101.9 102.2

March 93.0 97.0 100.3 102.5 102.3

June 93.9 98.1 100.6 102.6

Annual average (c) 93.1 96.6 100.0 101.9

Quarterly change (from previous quarter) - per cent (d)

September -0.2 1.3 1.1 0.5 -0.2

December -0.3 1.1 0.7 0.8 -0.1

March 0.3 0.9 0.4 0.5 0.1

June 1.0 1.2 0.3 0.1

Change from same quarter of previous year - per cent (d) \ September 0.4 2.3 4.3 2.0 1.1

December -0.4 3.7 4.0 2.0 0.3

March -0.1 4.3 3.4 2.2 -0.2

June 0.8 4.5 2.5 2.0

Annual average (e) 0.1 3.7 3.6 1.8

(a) Using trend data. (b) Reference year for index is 2012-13= 100.0. (c ) Average for year ending 30 June. Using original data. (d) Using trend data. (e) Annual average of year ending 30 June, using original data.

Update

Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product , Cat. no. 5206.0

2 September 2015

-2

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Per cent change from same quarter of previous year What is measured? The ratio of Gross Value Added to hours worked in the market sector can be used to measure changes in labour productivity.

The market sector is defined to include all industries except for: Public Administration and safety; Education and training; and Health care and social assistance.

It should be noted that the labour productivity measure reflects not only the contribution of labour to changes in production per hour worked, but also the contribution of capital and other factors (such as managerial efficiency and economies of scale).

From October 2014, seasonally adjusted estimates have been replaced with trend estimates.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

Related publications  Treasury, Budget papers

 Treasury, Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook

 OECD, Economic Outlook

 NAB, Business Research and Insights

Monthly statistical bulletin

20

4.1 Retail turnover

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Value (a) - $ million July 20 347 20 771 21 611 22 086 23 292

August 20 377 20 838 21 627 22 192 23 375

September 20 381 20 899 21 621 22 325 23 609

October 20 376 20 947 21 621 22 470 23 686

November 20 380 20 980 21 641 22 615 23 760

December 20 405 21 001 21 690 22 892 23 835

January 20 451 21 036 21 756 22 986 23 913

February 20 507 21 106 21 824 23 050 23 991

March 20 561 21 208 21 883 23 091 24 064

April 20 609 21 330 21 929 23 122 24 133

May 20 656 21 451 21 966 23 160

June 20 710 21 551 22 013 23 217

Annual (b) 245 883 254 006 260 851 272 920

This month compared to same month in previous year - % change (a)

July 4.0 2.1 4.0 2.2 5.5

August 3.7 2.3 3.8 2.6 5.3

September 3.2 2.5 3.5 3.3 5.7

October 2.7 2.8 3.2 3.9 5.4

November 2.3 2.9 3.1 4.5 5.1

December 2.2 2.9 3.3 5.5 4.1

January 2.3 2.9 3.4 5.7 4.0

February 2.5 2.9 3.4 5.6 4.1

March 2.6 3.1 3.2 5.5 4.2

April 2.5 3.5 2.8 5.4 4.4

May 2.3 3.9 2.4 5.4

June 2.1 4.1 2.1 5.5

Annual (b) 2.8 3.3 2.7 4.6

Update

Source: ABS, Retail Trade, Australia, Cat. no. 8501.0 3 July 2015

(a) Monthly figures (including the graph) are calculated on the trend series. Annual figures are calculated on the original series.

(b) 12 months ended June.

(c) Estimate are presented in current price terms, and therefore reflect both price and volume changes.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Annual change - per cent What is measured?

The ABS ‘Retail Trade’ publication provides estimates of the value of turnover of retail trade for Australian businesses. Turnover includes wholesale and retail sales, takings from repairs, meals and hiring of goods, some commissions, and since July 2000, the GST. Data is derived by the ABS from the monthly Retail Business Survey. The scope of this Survey is all employing retail trade businesses who predominantly sell to households. It includes 500 large businesses and a sample of 2,700 smaller businesses. For the purposes of the Survey, businesses are classified using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification. However, the Retail Business Survey does not include all classes in the ANZSIC Retail Trade Division, and also includes cafes, restaurants and take-away food services from the Accommodation and Food Services Division. This bulletin reports the monthly results at the Australian aggregate level, using the trend and original series. Prior to October 2014, seasonally adjusted figures were used.

Related statistics in this bulletin:  2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings  2.4 Consumer price index  4.2 Motor vehicle sales  4.4 Business investment

Related publications  NAB, Monthly Business Survey  Westpac - Melbourne Institute, Consumer Sentiment Bulletin

Monthly statistical bulletin

21

4.2 Motor vehicle sales

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Total vehicle sales (a)

July 85 879 85 484 93 428 94 454 93 062

August 85 225 86 039 94 483 94 420 92 976

September 84 759 86 405 95 413 94 461 92 813

October 84 575 86 572 96 074 94 465 92 759

November 84 636 86 635 96 287 94 337 92 939

December 84 774 86 904 96 018 94 007 93 358

January 84 822 87 581 95 517 93 501 93 871

February 84 698 88 581 95 096 92 970 94 382

March 84 538 89 617 94 888 92 603 94 830

April 84 461 90 583 94 822 92 484 95 288

May 84 548 91 520 94 723 92 648

June 84 928 92 441 94 573 92 919

Annual (c) 1 000 642 1 060 055 1 137 889 1 122 467

This month compared to same month in previous year - per cent change (a)

July 13.0 -0.5 9.3 1.1 -1.5

August 10.0 1.0 9.8 -0.1 -1.5

September 7.2 1.9 10.4 -1.0 -1.7

October 4.9 2.4 11.0 -1.7 -1.8

November 2.9 2.4 11.1 -2.0 -1.5

December 1.2 2.5 10.5 -2.1 -0.7

January -0.3 3.3 9.1 -2.1 0.4

February -1.7 4.6 7.4 -2.2 1.5

March -2.6 6.0 5.9 -2.4 2.4

April -3.1 7.2 4.7 -2.5 3.0

May -2.9 8.2 3.5 -2.2

June -1.9 8.8 2.3 -1.7

Annual (c) -1.2 5.9 7.3 -1.4

Update xx

Update

Source: ABS, Sales of New Motor vehicles , Australia , Cat. no. 9314.0

(b) The statistics are based on the VFACTS series produced by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI). VFACTS reports the numbers of new motor vehicle sales by dealers and direct sales by manufacturers throughout Australia.

(a) Monthly figures (including the graph) are calculated on the trend series. Annual figures are calculated on the original series.

(c) 12 months ended June.

16 June 2015

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Number Passenger vehicles

Sports Utility Vehicles

Other vehicles

What is measured? The ABS publication ‘Sales of New Motor Vehicles’ presents monthly statistics for new motor vehicle sales in Australia. The data can be broken into ‘passenger’, ‘sports utility’ and ‘other’ vehicles. ‘Other vehicles’ includes goods carrying vans, rigid trucks, prime movers and buses.

The numbers in the two tables represent total motor vehicle sales. The graph shows sales of passenger, sports utility and other vehicles. Data at a state/territory level, by category, and in original, seasonally adjusted and trend terms is available from the ABS publication.

This series is subject to large and irregular fluctuations and care should be taken when interpreting movements in the series.

This bulletin reports the monthly results at the Australian aggregate level, using the trend and original series. Prior to October 2014, seasonally adjusted figures were used.

Related statistics in this bulletin  4.1 Retail turnover

Related publications  ABS, Motor Vehicle Census Australia, Cat. no. 9309.0

 ABS, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, Australia, Cat. no. 9208.0

 FCAI, Vehicle sales http://www.fcai.com.au/sales

 NAB, Monthly Business Survey

 Westpac - Melbourne Institute, Consumer Sentiment Bulletin

Monthly statistical bulletin

22

4.3 Dwelling approvals

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Number (a) \ July 14 517 13 002 13 409 14 875 16 457

August 14 261 12 708 13 482 15 289 16 689

September 14 161 12 361 13 473 15 759 16 997

October 14 133 12 021 13 385 16 225 17 436

November 14 101 11 658 13 290 16 562 17 956

December 14 051 11 371 13 254 16 686 18 436

January 13 959 11 384 13 234 16 644 18 798

February 13 752 11 701 13 304 16 511 19 010

March 13 505 12 147 13 499 16 398 19 124

April 13 351 12 556 13 787 16 343 19 045

May 13 277 12 921 14 119 16 304

June 13 182 13 223 14 493 16 333

Annual (b) 168 103 149 999 161 411 194 853

This month compared to same month in previous year - per cent change (a)

July 15.7 -10.4 3.1 10.9 10.6

August 9.3 -10.9 6.1 13.4 9.2

September 4.4 -12.7 9.0 17.0 7.9

October 0.4 -14.9 11.3 21.2 7.5

November -3.6 -17.3 14.0 24.6 8.4

December -7.3 -19.1 16.6 25.9 10.5

January -10.7 -18.4 16.3 25.8 12.9

February -13.6 -14.9 13.7 24.1 15.1

March -15.5 -10.1 11.1 21.5 16.6

April -15.5 -6.0 9.8 18.5 16.5

May -13.9 -2.7 9.3 15.5

June -11.8 0.3 9.6 12.7

Annual (b) -4.8 -10.8 7.6 20.7

Update

Source: ABS, Building Approvals, Australia , Cat. no. 8731.0

(a) Monthly figures (including the graph) are calculated on the trend series. Annual figures are calculated on the original series.

(b) 12 months ended June.

1 July 2015

0

5 000

10 000

15 000

20 000

25 000

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Number What is measured?

The ABS publication ‘Building Approvals’ reports the number of dwelling units approved in Australia—where a dwelling is a self-contained suite of rooms for long-term residential use. The data for this publication is compiled from, amongst other sources, permits issued by various jurisdictions. It shows the number of dwelling units approved by state and territory, and by sector (private or public).

This publication also contains data on the value of building approved for residential buildings and non-residential buildings.

This series is subject to large and irregular fluctuations and care should be taken when interpreting movements in the series.

This bulletin reports the monthly results at the Australian aggregate level, using the trend and original series. Prior to October 2014, seasonally adjusted figures were used.

Related statistics in this bulletin  5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

 5.3 Lending for housing

 5.4 Home loan affordability

Related publications  ABS, Building Activity, Australia, Cat. no. 8752.0

 ABS, Construction Work Done, Australia, Cat. no. 8755.0

 ABS, Dwelling Unit Commencements, Australia, Cat. no. 8750.0

 ABS, Engineering Construction Activity, Australia, Cat. no. 8762.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

23

4.4 Business investment

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Chain volume measures (a) (b) - $ million

September 48 768 59 106 66 185 64 664 60 390

December 50 287 62 173 65 271 62 534 59 143

March 52 713 64 984 65 590 61 299 57 898

June 55 835 66 525 65 858 61 151

Annual (c) 206 522 252 773 264 062 252 683

This quarter compared to same quarter in previous year - per cent change (a) (b)

September 2.1 21.2 12.0 -2.3 -6.6

December 6.2 23.6 5.0 -4.2 -5.4

March 11.4 23.3 0.9 -6.5 -5.5

June 16.9 19.1 -1.0 -7.1

Annual (c) 8.5 22.4 4.5 -4.3

(c) Year ending 30 June.

Update 2 September 2015

Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product , Cat. no. 5206.0

(a) Reference year for chain volume measures is 2012-13. Chain volume measures are not additive.

(b) Monthly figures (including the graph) are calculated using the trend series and chain volume measures. Annual figures are calculated using original, current data.

40 000

43 000

46 000

49 000

52 000

55 000

58 000

61 000

64 000

67 000

70 000

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

$ million

What is measured? Business investment is a component of the wider ABS System of National Accounts statistics. The business investment component measures private gross fixed capital formation in non-dwelling construction, machinery and equipment, ‘cultivated biological resources’ (such as livestock) and ‘intellectual property products’ (such as R&D) by private businesses.

This bulletin reports both monthly trend chain volume measures and annual original current measures for private business new capital formation. The ABS also publishes seasonally adjusted data for this series.

Prior to October 2014, seasonally adjusted figures were published.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.1 Employment

 3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share

 5.1 Business interest rates

 5.5 Stock exchange indexes

Related publications  NAB, Monthly Business Survey

 Westpac - Melbourne Institute, Consumer Sentiment Bulletin

Monthly statistical bulletin

24

4.5 Bankrupts

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Non-business related bankrupts - Number

September 4 941 4 503 4 281 3 914 3 498

December 4 515 4 496 4 097 3 892 3 408

March 4 380 4 366 3 884 3 998 3 624

June 4 499 4 205 4 071 3 160

Annual (b) 18 335 17 570 16 333 14 964

Business related bankrupts - Number

September 1 501 1 400 1 683 1 240 1 072

December 1 508 1 291 1 383 1 126 895

March 1 231 1 414 1 086 1 140 903

June 1 345 1 379 1 302 885

Annual (b) 5 585 5 484 5 454 4 391

Total bankrupts

September 6 442 5 903 5 964 5 154 4 570

December 6 023 5 787 5 480 5 018 4 303

March 5 611 5 780 4 970 5 138 4 527

June 5 844 5 584 5 373 4 045

Annual (b) 23 920 23 054 21 787 19 355

This quarter compared to same quarter in previous year - per cent change

September -13.4 -8.4 1.0 -13.6 -11.3

December -12.8 -3.9 -5.3 -8.4 -14.2

March -16.7 3.0 -14.0 3.4 -11.9

June -16.7 -4.4 -3.8 -24.7

Annual (b) -14.9 -3.6 -5.5 -11.2

Update 14 July 2015 Source: Australian Financial Security Authority

(a) The quarterly figures are provisional. Annual totals are verified and reported in AFSA's Annual Report. However, subsequent revisions are not made to the quarterly figures.

(b) Year ended 30 June.

0

1 000

2 000

3 000

4 000

5 000

6 000

7 000

Jun-11 Jun-12 Jun-13 Jun-14 Jun-15

Number of total bankrupts

What is measured? The Australian Financial Security Authority (AFSA) is the Australian Government agency responsible for the administration and regulation of the personal insolvency system. Every quarter AFSA publishes results of their activities under the Bankruptcy Act 1966. AFSA publish preliminary figures in their reports and verified annual figures in their annual report.

The data is categorised into national, state/territory and regional results for different types of personal insolvency activity (namely, bankrupts, debt agreements and personal insolvency agreements.)

This bulletin reports the data for non-business related bankrupts, business related bankrupts (where bankruptcy is directly related to a business interest) and total bankrupts. This data does not cover corporate insolvency.

From January 2013, AFSA (formerly known as Insolvency and Trustee Service Australia) commenced reporting the number of individual debtors, as opposed to the number of administrations.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

 5.4 Home loan affordability

Monthly statistical bulletin

25

5.1 Business interest rates

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Small business interest rate (a) (b) - per cent

September 8.25 8.50 7.70 6.80 6.65

December 8.60 8.15 7.25 6.75 6.55

March 8.55 8.20 7.20 6.70 6.35

June 8.55 7.75 7.05 6.70

Annual average (d) 8.49 8.15 7.30 6.74

Large business interest rate (a) (c) - per cent

September 6.40 6.45 5.65 4.75 4.45

December 6.65 6.25 5.20 4.60 4.40

March 6.60 6.20 5.10 4.60 4.25

June 6.55 5.70 4.95 4.50

Annual average (d) 6.55 6.15 5.23 4.61

(a) The data are weighted average rates, which are calculated from outstanding credit held by businesses. (b) In this context, a small business loan is defined as being less than $2 million. (c) In this context, a large business loan is defined as being $2 million or more. (d) Year ending June.

Source: RBA website, Statistical Tables, Interest Rates, Indicator Lending Rates (F5).

Update

2 July 2015

4.0

4.5

5.0

5.5

6.0

6.5

7.0

7.5

8.0

8.5

9.0

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Per cent

Small business rate

Large business rate

What is measured? The Reserve Bank of Australia publishes a range of interest rates on its website. The rates are indicative of the rates paid in different sectors of the economy.

The small business interest rate is the weighted average rate of interest being paid on business loans less than $2 million. The large business interest rate is the weighted average rate of interest being paid on business loans of $2 million or more.

The weighted average process generates interest rates that are not reflective of new lending interest rates because the calculation includes all previous loans issued that are still outstanding. The measure is a more accurate reflection of the debt servicing costs experienced, on average, by businesses.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.4 Consumer price index

 3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.3 Wages and profits share

 4.4 Business investment

Related publications  RBA, Statement on Monetary Policy

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly Bulletin of Economic Trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

26

5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Banks' housing interest rate - per cent

July 7.40 7.80 6.85 6.20 5.95

August 7.40 7.80 6.85 5.95 5.95

September 7.40 7.80 6.85 5.95 5.95

October 7.40 7.80 6.65 5.95 5.95

November 7.80 7.55 6.65 5.95 5.95

December 7.80 7.30 6.45 5.95 5.95

January 7.80 7.30 6.45 5.95 5.95

February 7.80 7.40 6.45 5.95 5.65

March 7.80 7.40 6.45 5.95 5.65

April 7.80 7.40 6.45 5.95 5.65

May 7.80 7.05 6.20 5.95 5.45

June 7.80 6.85 6.20 5.95

Interbank overnight cash rate - per cent

July 4.50 4.75 3.50 2.75 2.50

August 4.50 4.75 3.50 2.55 2.50

September 4.50 4.75 3.50 2.50 2.50

October 4.50 4.75 3.27 2.50 2.50

November 4.73 4.51 3.25 2.50 2.50

December 4.75 4.30 3.03 2.50 2.50

January 4.75 4.25 3.00 2.50 2.50

February 4.75 4.25 3.00 2.50 2.28

March 4.75 4.25 3.00 2.50 2.25

April 4.75 4.25 3.00 2.50 2.25

May 4.75 3.77 2.80 2.50 2.04

June 4.75 3.54 2.75 2.50

Source: RBA website, Statistical Tables, Interest Rates , (F1.1 and F5).

Update 2 July 2015

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Per cent

Bank rates for housing loans

Interbank Overnight Cash Rate

What is measured? The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) publishes a range of interest rate statistics on its website, including interest rates for personal and business lending.

The figures in the first table on the left are banks’ standard variable home loan rate for owner occupiers. These rates are calculated by the RBA using the average rates from large lenders.

The figures in the second table are the ‘Interbank Overnight Cash Rate.’ The ‘interbank rate’ is a weighted average of the interest rates at which banks have borrowed and lent exchange settlement funds overnight. This interest rate significantly affects other interest rates in the economy. Monthly figures are an average of daily figures for the month.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.4 Consumer price index  3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 5.1 Business interest rates

 5.4 Home loan affordability

 8.4 Short-term interest rates

Related publications  RBA, Bulletin

 RBA, Financial Stability Review

 RBA, Statement on Monetary Policy

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly Bulletin of Economic Trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

27

5.3 Lending for housing

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Value of finance commitments for owner-occupied housing: % change (a) (b) (c)

July 0.38 0.61 0.78 1.36 0.33

August 0.89 0.43 0.67 1.45 0.61

September 1.21 0.47 0.34 1.55 0.93

October 1.06 0.55 0.22 1.52 1.24

November 0.58 0.53 0.26 1.29 1.46

December -0.03 0.27 0.47 0.95 1.49

January -0.52 -0.06 0.92 1.58 1.37

February -0.67 -0.39 1.53 0.31 1.20

March -0.41 -0.56 1.89 0.25 0.85

April 0.17 -0.41 1.87 0.28

May 0.75 0.02 1.58 0.29

June 0.93 0.53 1.39 0.28

Value of finance commitments for investment housing: % change (a) (b) (c)

July -1.4 0.8 0.7 2.4 1.9

August -1.6 0.2 1.0 3.2 2.2

September -1.4 0.0 1.4 3.7 2.1

October -1.1 0.1 1.8 3.7 1.7

November -1.0 0.6 2.2 3.3 1.3

December -1.3 1.0 2.4 2.5 1.1

January -1.5 1.2 2.5 1.4 1.1

February -1.4 1.2 2.4 0.6 1.0

March -0.7 0.8 2.1 0.3 0.8

April 0.4 0.4 1.7 0.5

May 1.2 0.2 1.4 1.1

June 1.2 0.4 1.6 1.6

(a) Includes re-financing. (b) Using the trend series. (c) % change from previous month.

Update

Source: ABS, Housing Finance , Cat. no. 5609.0 9 June 2015

- 2

- 1

0

1

2

3

4

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Owner-occupied

Investment

% change

What is measured? The ABS housing finance publication measures the number and value of finance commitments made by Australian lenders for housing purposes. The lending figures relate to persons looking to buy or build homes to live in (owner occupiers), as well as those seeking to buy or build homes for investment purposes.This data relates to the value of finance commitments for owner occupied housing and investment housing. It is not possible to exclude the value of re-financing from investment housing. As such, it has been included in all of the data.

ABS advised in the December 2014 release that:

In this issue revisions have been made to the original series as a result of improved reporting of survey and administrative data, and implementation of modelled first home buyer estimates. These revisions have impacted significantly on: First home buyers owner occupied housing for periods October 2012 to November 2014 and insignificantly on: Owner occupied housing for periods October 2012 to November 2014 and Investment housing for periods August 2014 to November 2014. Seasonally adjusted and trend series have been revised as a result of the incorporation of estimates for the latest month and the revision of seasonal factors due to the concurrent seasonal adjustment methodology.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 4.3 Dwelling approvals

 5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

 5.4 Home loan affordability

Related publications  ABS, Lending Finance, Cat. no. 5671.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

28

5.4 Home loan affordability

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Average size of new loans for owner occupied houses (a) - $

September 305 300 300 600 300 100 306 100 324 900

December 307 300 298 800 308 000 322 000 325 642

March 303 900 289 600 301 100 319 100 327 792

June 305 700 301 600 304 500 326 800 329 625

Annual average (b) 306 008 298 367 302 525 315 642

Loan repayments as a proportion of family income - per cent

September 35.5 34.4 33.3 29.8 30.4

December 36.0 33.6 32.6 30.8 31.5

March 35.0 32.7 32.1 30.6 30.8

June 35.4 31.9 31.0 30.9

Average monthly repayment on home loans - $

September 2 205 2 258 2 176 1 993 2 106

December 2 272 2 227 2 131 2 092 2 197

March 2 240 2 196 2 106 2 092 2 159

June 2 290 2 155 2 050 2 119

(b) Monthly average ending June.

Sources: Real Estate Institute of Australia and Adelaide Bank 'Housing Affordability Report ABS, Housing Finance , Cat. no. 5609.0

Update 9 June 2015 (Cat. no. 5609.0) June qtr 2015 Housing Affordability Report due in Sept

(a) Includes the construction and purchase of new dwellings, and the purchase of established dwellings (including refinancing). Excludes alterations and additions.

28

30

32

34

36

38

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Loan repayments as a proportion of family income What is measured?

The ABS’ Housing Finance publication measures the number and value of finance commitments made by Australian lenders for housing. The loan size figures contained in this bulletin are for people buying or building homes to live in (owner occupiers).

The Real Estate Institute of Australia /Adelaide Bank Housing Affordability Report provides data on number of loans, loan repayments and family income by State/Territory and in Australia. This bulletin shows loan repayments as a proportion of family income, and the average monthly loan repayment for Australia from that report.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.1 Average weekly ordinary time earnings

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

 5.3 Lending for housing

Related publications  ABS, Lending Finance, Cat. no. 5671.0

 Housing Industry Association- Commonwealth Bank, Affordability Report

Monthly statistical bulletin

29

5.5 Stock exchange indexes

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

All ordinaries index (a)

July 4 507.4 4 500.5 4 289.4 5 035.7 5 623.1

August 4 438.8 4 369.9 4 339.0 5 125.3 5 624.6

September 4 636.9 4 070.1 4 406.3 5 217.7 5 296.8

October 4 733.4 4 360.5 4 535.4 5 420.3 5 505.0

November 4 676.4 4 184.7 4 518.0 5 314.3 5 298.1

December 4 846.9 4 111.0 4 664.6 5 353.1 5 388.6

January 4 849.9 4 325.7 4 901.0 5 205.1 5 551.6

February 4 923.6 4 388.1 5 120.4 5 415.4 5 898.5

March 4 928.6 4 420.0 4 979.9 5 403.0 5 861.9

April 4 899.0 4 467.2 5 168.6 5 470.8 5 773.7

May 4 788.9 4 133.7 4 914.0 5 473.8

June 4 659.8 4 135.5 4 775.4 5 382.0

S&P/ASX 200 index (b)

July 4 493.5 4 424.6 4 269.2 5 052.0 5 623.9

August 4 404.2 4 296.5 4 316.1 5 135.0 5 625.9

September 4 582.9 4 008.6 4 387.0 5 218.9 5 292.8

October 4 661.6 4 298.1 4 517.0 5 425.5 5 526.6

November 4 584.4 4 119.8 4 506.0 5 320.0 5 313.0

December 4 745.2 4 056.6 4 648.9 5 352.2 5 411.0

January 4 753.9 4 262.7 4 878.8 5 190.0 5 588.3

February 4 831.7 4 298.5 5 104.0 5 404.8 5 928.8

March 4 837.9 4 335.2 4 966.5 5 394.8 5 891.5

April 4 823.2 4 396.6 5 191.2 5 489.1 5 790.0

May 4 708.3 4 076.3 4 926.6 5 492.5

June 4 608.0 4 094.6 4 802.6 5 395.7

(a) Index at the end of the month. Base: January 1980 = 500.0. (b) Index at the end of the month. Base: March 2000 = 3 133.3.

Source: Australian Stock Exchange, Market Statistics, Historical Market Statistics.

Update

2 July 2015

3 000

3 500

4 000

4 500

5 000

5 500

6 000

Jun-10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

All ordinaries index What is measured?

The purpose of these measures is to provide a broad picture of the performance of the Australian corporate sector. The corporate sector is characterised by larger businesses capable of listing on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX).

The All Ordinaries index is a weighted index of the share prices of the largest 500 companies listed on the ASX.

The S&P/ASX 200 index comprises 200 stocks of larger companies listed on the ASX. The All Ordinaries is typically the benchmark for the

performance of ‘the share market’, whereas the S&P/ASX 200 is indicative of the performance of investment grade, highly liquid, shares on the ASX.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.4 Household debt and household saving ratios

 4.4 Business investment

 5.1 Business interest rates

Related publications  Australian Securities Exchange, Indices, Types, Capitalisation indices

Monthly statistical bulletin

30

6.1 International trade in goods and services

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Exports of goods and services (a) - $ million

July 25 090 26 184 25 443 26 481 26 792

August 24 172 27 934 24 568 27 480 26 349

September 24 117 27 301 24 270 27 445 26 421

October 24 511 27 306 24 660 27 355 26 975

November 24 406 27 296 24 632 27 311 26 881

December 24 406 27 091 24 675 28 278 27 169

January 23 844 24 759 24 621 29 251 27 378

February 23 458 24 493 25 161 29 239 27 642

March 25 753 24 903 25 688 28 448 27 220

April 25 686 26 023 25 671 27 923 25 659

May 26 283 26 471 26 585 26 151

June 25 956 26 380 26 451 26 242

Annual 297 682 316 141 302 425 331 604 268 486

Imports of goods and services (a) - $ million

July 23 707 25 576 27 367 28 194 27 965

August 23 026 25 973 26 756 28 690 27 293

September 22 847 26 195 26 662 28 148 28 467

October 23 154 26 457 26 986 28 217 27 895

November 22 945 26 650 27 679 27 820 28 036

December 23 210 26 289 26 291 28 403 27 814

January 22 818 27 197 26 478 28 645 28 479

February 23 865 25 571 26 329 27 865 29 233

March 24 109 27 006 26 426 27 817 28 451

April 24 242 27 063 26 443 28 826 29 547

May 24 634 27 596 27 301 28 323

June 24 857 27 357 26 982 27 980

Annual 283 414 318 930 321 700 338 928 283 180

(a) Balance of payments definition. Monthly figures are seasonally adjusted.

Source: ABS, International trade in goods and services , Cat. no. 5368.0 Update

2nd July 2015

16 000

18 000

20 000

22 000

24 000

26 000

28 000

30 000

Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14

$ million

Exports

Imports

What is measured? International merchandise trade statistics measure Australia’s exports and imports of goods and services on a recorded trade basis.

Adjustments for coverage, timing and valuation are applied to recorded trade data to convert them to a balance of payments basis. These are the data reported in this bulletin.

Goods include all movable goods (merchandise) which change ownership between Australian residents and non-residents whether or not they actually cross customs frontier.

The services component covers services rendered by Australian residents to non-residents and by non-residents to residents (eg travel, transportation, insurance).

The ABS publishes these statistics in original, seasonally adjusted and trend terms.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product

 6.2 Balance on current account

 6.3 Terms of trade

 6.4 Exchange rates

Related publications  ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

 RBA, Bulletin

 Treasury, Budget papers

 OECD, Economic outlook

 NAB, Australian outlook and research

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

31

6.2 Balance on current account

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Value (a) - $ million

September -10 199 -8 997 -16 196 -13 904 -12 206

December -10 967 -10 607 -17 400 -12 328 -10 239

March -12 396 -17 036 -12 621 -7 643 -10 741

June -10 579 -13 456 -12 983 -14 396

Proportion of gross domestic product (a) - per cent

September -3.0 -2.4 -4.3 -3.6 -3.1

December -3.1 -2.9 -4.6 -3.1 -2.5

March -3.5 -4.6 -3.3 -1.9 -2.7

June -2.9 -3.6 -3.4 -3.6

Value - 12 months ending quarter shown - $ million

September -57 364 -43 301 -56 642 -57 321 -47 119

December -48 202 -42 425 -63 972 -51 906 -45 057

March -42 333 -46 373 -59 737 -47 494 -47 820

June -43 688 -49 253 -58 992 -49 107

Proportion of gross domestic product - 12 months ending quarter shown - per cent

September -4.3 -3.0 -3.8 -3.7 -3.0

December -3.5 -2.9 -4.3 -3.3 -2.8

March -3.1 -3.1 -4.0 -3.0 -3.0

June -3.1 -3.3 -3.9 -3.1

(a) Seasonally adjusted.

Sources: ABS, Balance of payments and international investment position, Cat. no. 5302.0 ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product , Cat. no. 5206.0

1 Sept 2015 - Balance of Payments 2 Sept 2015 - National Accounts

-20 000

-18 000

-16 000

-14 000

-12 000

-10 000

-8 000

-6 000

-4 000

-2 000

0

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Quarterly value - $ million What is measured?

The Australian current account, part of the ABS balance of payments statistics, measures receipts and payments between Australia and the rest of the world as a result of transactions in goods, services, income and transfers.

The goods and services components are exports and imports; the income is earnings from factors of production, i.e. compensation of employees and investment income; and transfers are where there is no resulting exchange, e.g. gifts, taxes and grants.

The difference between the receipts and payments gives the current account balance. When receipts are less than payments—the usual Australian position—then there is a negative balance on current account or a deficit. A positive balance is a surplus.

Related statistics in this bulletin  6.1 International trade in goods and services

 6.3 Terms of trade

 6.4 Exchange rates

 6.5 Foreign debt

Related publications  RBA, Bulletin

 Treasury, Budget papers

 Treasury, Mid-year economic and fiscal outlook

 OECD, Economic outlook

Monthly statistical bulletin

32

6.3 Terms of trade

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Implicit price deflator for exports of goods and services (a) (b) - index

September 107.7 116.7 100.7 105.0 95.3

December 105.3 113.4 99.2 105.3 95.6

March 110.7 105.6 100.3 106.1 92.8

June 114.6 107.3 100.0 98.5

Annual average 109.7 111.2 100.0 103.5

Implicit price deflator for imports of goods and services (a) (b) - index

September 102.1 98.5 99.4 106.8 106.3

December 98.1 101.0 100.3 106.7 108.3

March 98.5 99.0 100.4 109.6 108.3

June 98.3 101.5 100.4 106.7

Annual average 99.2 100.1 100.0 103.5

Terms of trade (a) (b) (c) - index

September 105.5 118.5 101.3 98.3 89.7

December 107.4 112.3 99.0 98.6 88.3

March 112.5 106.6 99.9 96.7 85.7

June 116.6 105.7 99.6 92.3

Annual average 110.6 111.1 100.0 96.3

(a) Quarterly figures are seasonally adjusted.

(c) Index of the ratio of the implicit price deflator for exports of goods and services to the implicit price deflator for imports of goods and services

Sources: ABS, Balance of payments and international investment position, Cat. no. 5302.0

Update

(b) Base: 2012-13 = 100.0.

1st Sept 2015

80

90

100

110

120

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Terms of trade - index

What is measured? The terms of trade index is calculated by dividing the IPD for exports of goods and services by the IPD for imports of goods and services, with the result being multiplied by 100.

An IPD is calculated by dividing a current price series by the corresponding chain volume measures series.

A rise in the terms of trade index implies a country can purchase more imports from the same amount of exports.

Related statistics in this bulletin  6.1 International trade in goods and services

 6.2 Balance on current account

 6.4 Exchange rates

 6.5 Foreign debt

Related publications  ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

 RBA, Bulletin

 Treasury, Budget papers

 OECD, Economic outlook

 NAB, Australian outlook and research

 Access Economics, Business outlook

Monthly statistical bulletin

33

6.4 Exchange rates

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

United States dollar (a) - cents

July 89.86 109.54 105.26 90.37 93.24

August 89.18 106.91 103.10 89.47 93.49

September 96.67 97.81 104.64 93.09 87.52

October 97.61 105.09 103.78 94.90 88.05

November 96.18 100.21 104.31 90.87 84.91

December 101.63 101.56 103.84 89.48 82.02

January 99.24 106.37 103.94 87.63 77.81

February 101.63 108.16 102.75 89.47 77.92

March 103.34 104.02 104.26 92.21 76.34

April 109.00 104.53 103.68 92.87 79.81

May 107.09 97.27 96.49 93.19 76.63

June 107.39 101.91 92.75 94.20

Trade weighted index (b) - index

July 69.4 78.4 78.9 69.4 71.5

August 69.0 76.5 77.0 69.2 71.9

September 72.9 72.4 76.9 71.2 68.9

October 72.7 76.9 76.5 72.1 69.4

November 73.0 74.6 77.2 69.8 68.2

December 75.8 75.8 77.1 68.9 66.5

January 74.0 77.9 77.7 67.7 63.9

February 75.5 79.2 77.4 68.9 64.1

March 76.3 76.9 79.1 71.0 63.3

April 78.9 77.0 78.4 71.4 65.3

May 77.8 73.6 74.0 71.5 63.7

June 77.8 76.5 71.4 72.0

(a) US cents per A$. Rate at end of month. (b) At end of month. Base: May 1970 = 100.0.

Source: RBA, Daily statistical release

Update 1 July 2015

50 55

60 65

70 75

80 85

90 95

100 105

110

Jul-10 Jul-11 Jul-12 Jul-13 Jul-14

US cents/Index

Trade weighted index US cents per $Aus

What is measured? The exchange rate, also known as the foreign exchange rate, is the price of one currency expressed in terms of another currency.

Any exchange rate can be quoted two ways, e.g. Australian dollars per one US dollar or US dollars per one Australian dollar. The convention for the Australian dollar is that it is quoted as the foreign currency price per Australian dollar.

The trade weighted index (TWI) is the weighted average value of the Australian dollar in terms of the currencies of Australia’s 22 main trading partners. The base value was set at 100 in May 1970.

Related statistics in this bulletin  6.1 International trade in goods and services

 6.2 Current account balance

 6.3 Terms of trade

 6.5 Foreign debt

Related publications  ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

 RBA, Bulletin

 Treasury, Budget papers

 OECD, Economic outlook

 NAB, Australian outlook and research

 Access Economics, Business outlook

 Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

Monthly statistical bulletin

34

6.5 Foreign debt

Quarter (a) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Gross foreign debt, public sector - $ million

September 206 020 265 779 304 342 299 576 338 368

December 211 351 284 201 301 006 311 551 354 372

March 225 176 293 999 300 390 321 152 370 579

June 231 499 303 648 296 942 329 584

Gross foreign debt, private sector - $ million

September 1 069 937 1 141 261 1 140 780 1 269 773 1 431 498

December 1 037 756 1 088 437 1 162 691 1 353 016 1 520 028

March 1 056 331 1 094 877 1 160 812 1 335 994 1 622 106

June 1 072 338 1 130 576 1 263 723 1 366 900

Gross foreign debt, total - $ million

September 1 275 958 1 407 040 1 445 123 1 569 348 1 769 867

December 1 249 107 1 372 638 1 463 697 1 664 568 1 874 400

March 1 281 507 1 388 876 1 461 201 1 657 146 1 992 685

June 1 303 837 1 434 224 1 560 665 1 696 484

Net foreign debt - $ million

September 665 010 723 681 745 910 812 090 889 390

December 636 380 716 774 755 682 847 891 927 097

March 665 904 725 230 764 378 847 244 954 672

June 671 174 746 170 796 595 867 314

Net foreign debt - percentage of gross domestic product (b)

September 50.1 50.5 49.9 53.0 55.8

December 46.9 49.3 50.3 54.6 58.0

March 48.2 49.2 50.6 54.0 59.5

June 47.7 50.1 52.4 54.8

(a) At end of period. (b) Net foreign debt at the end of the period as a proportion of gross domestic product for four quarters up to that period.

Sources: Update

ABS, Balance of payments and international investment position , Cat. no. 5302.0 1 Sept 2015 (BOP) ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, 2 Sept 2015 (National Accounts) Cat. no. 5206.0

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Net foreign debt - percentage of GDP

What is measured? Gross foreign debt measures all non-equity financial claims by non-residents on residents of Australia. The major component of gross foreign debt is the amount of borrowings from non-residents by residents of Australia. Net foreign debt is gross foreign debt less non-equity assets, such as foreign reserves held by the Reserve Bank, and lending by residents of Australia to non-residents. Net and gross foreign debt are measured at the end of each quarter.

Related statistics in this bulletin  6.1 International trade in goods and services

 6.2 Balance on current account  6.3 Terms of trade

 6.4 Exchange rates

Related publications  RBA, Bulletin  Treasury, Budget papers

 OECD, Economic outlook  NAB, Australian outlook and research  Access Economics, Business

outlook

Monthly statistical bulletin

35

7.1 Population

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Estimated resident population (a) - '000 September 22 104.4 22 432.0 22 827.8 23 226.4 23 490.7

December 22 172.5 22 520.3 22 920.8 23 310.7

March 22 268.8 22 637.1 23 033.9 23 422.3

June 22 340.0 22 728.3 23 125.9 23 490.7

Annual change - '000 September 316.3 327.6 395.8 398.6 364.9

December 306.8 347.8 400.5 389.9

March 304.7 368.4 396.8 388.4

June 308.3 388.2 397.6 364.9

Annual change - per cent September 1.45 1.48 1.76 1.75 1.58

December 1.40 1.57 1.78 1.70

March 1.39 1.65 1.75 1.69

June 1.40 1.74 1.75 1.58

(a) At the end of the quarter.

Source: ABS, Australian demographic statistics , Cat. no. 3101.0

Update

25 June 2015

1.0

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.8

1.9

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Annual change - per cent

What is measured? Known as the estimated resident population (ERP), the estimates include births, deaths and overseas and interstate migration for each of the states and territories plus external territories of Australia. When ERP data is first released it is preliminary estimates. As further data on overseas arrivals and departures becomes available the estimates are revised—this usually happens after a year. Revised population data becomes final only after each Census. The ABS also publishes data by age groups, major population regions and experimental estimates and projections of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Projection estimates are also available for resident populations, number of households and average household size.

Related statistics in this bulletin  7.2 Components of population change  7.3 Overseas arrivals—visitors and

settlers

Related publications  ABS, Australian historical population statistics, Cat. no. 3105.0.65.001

 ABS, Population projections, Cat. no. 3222.0  ABS, Population by age and sex, Regions of Australia, Cat. no.

3235.0

Monthly statistical bulletin

36

7.2 Components of population change

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Births - '000 September 76.3 76.2 78.7 79.8 82.0

December 72.5 74.2 77.9 70.8

March 76.0 78.1 77.4 78.8

June 76.3 77.5 77.1 71.5

Annual 301.1 306.0 311.1 300.9

Deaths - '000 September 38.5 39.6 42.2 40.5 44.1

December 35.8 36.1 35.4 34.6

March 33.8 34.1 34.2 37.1

June 37.4 37.5 37.3 36.4

Annual 145.5 147.3 149.1 148.6

Natural increase - '000 September 37.8 36.6 36.5 39.3 37.9

December 36.6 38.2 42.5 36.1

March 42.3 44.1 43.2 41.7

June 39.0 40.0 39.8 35.1

Annual 155.7 158.9 162.0 152.2

Net overseas migration (a) - '000 September 41.8 55.4 63.0 61.2 52.4

December 38.4 50.1 50.5 48.2

March 61.0 72.8 70.0 69.9

June 39.2 51.2 52.2 33.4

Annual 180.4 229.5 235.7 212.7

(a) From September 2006 the ABS introduced an improved methodology for estimating

net overseas migration. These data are not comparable with earlier data.

Update

Source: ABS, Australian demographic statistics , Cat. no. 3101.0 25 June 2014

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Persons '000

Births Natural increase Net overseas migration

What is measured? The latest several quarters of data are preliminary and accumulations or lags in the reporting process mean they can be an underestimate or an overestimate of the true number. Natural increase is calculated by subtracting the estimated number of deaths from births. Net overseas migration is the difference between permanent and long-term arrivals, and permanent and long-term departures. The ABS has developed an improved methodology for calculating net overseas migration from September quarter 2006 onwards. The methodology better captures the change in the characteristics of international travellers (e.g. the increasing numbers of overseas students and temporary long-term business migrants) but makes the data inconsistent with earlier figures.

Related statistics in this bulletin  7.1 Population  7.3 Overseas arrivals—visitors and settlers

Related publications  ABS, Migration, Cat. no. 3412.0  ABS, Births, Cat. no. 3301.0  ABS, Deaths, Cat. no. 3302.0  Department of Immigration and

Citizenship (DIAC), Population flows  DIAC, Immigration update

Monthly statistical bulletin

37

7.3 Overseas arrivals—visitors and settlers

Month 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15

Visitors (a) (b) - '000

July 486.0 483.7 502.1 529.2 576.7

August 489.4 487.4 506.2 534.6 578.3

September 491.6 489.1 510.2 540.3 580.4

October 491.9 489.0 513.1 545.7 583.0

November 490.0 488.6 514.4 550.3 585.5

December 486.6 488.4 514.1 554.9 588.5

January 482.4 489.2 513.0 559.7

February 478.1 491.1 512.0 564.4

March 474.8 493.1 512.3 568.4

April 473.6 495.0 514.5 571.3

May 475.0 496.8 518.6 573.3

June 478.9 499.0 523.8 575.0

Annual 5 798.3 5 890.4 6 154.3 6 667.1

Settlers (c) - '000

July 9.7 11.5 11.7 11.8 9.6

August 11.6 12.9 13.2 13.5 11.8

September 10.8 12.7 12.5 12.2 10.5

October 9.4 12.4 11.9 12.1 10.2

November 9.4 12.9 11.6 11.4 10.2

December 10.0 13.9 12.9 11.9 11.7

January 10.5 14.2 12.4 11.6

February 10.5 14.4 12.7 11.7

March 11.6 14.7 14.1 11.7

April 11.2 13.3 12.6 10.8

May 11.0 12.7 13.2 11.6

June 11.7 13.5 13.6 10.4

Annual 127.5 159.0 152.4 140.6

(a) Monthly figures are trend figures. (b) Visitors are overseas visitors whose intended stay in Australia is less than 12 months.

Source: ABS, Overseas arrivals and departures , Cat. no. 3401.0

(c) Settlers are travellers who hold migrant visas, New Zealand citizens who indicate an intention to settle, and those who are otherwise eligible to settle. Update

1 June 2015

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Settlers '000

What is measured? The statistics in these tables, published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), relate to the number of movements of visitors and settlers rather than the number of visitors and settlers (i.e. multiple movements of individual persons during a given period are each counted separately).

Settlers’ data cover persons whose purpose on arriving in Australia is to permanently settle. Those people who apply for and are granted residency from within Australia (onshore grants) are not included.

Complete immigration data can be sourced from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP). Data on persons departing Australia as well as a range of other characteristics of travellers, such as age, sex and country of birth, are also available from the ABS, DIBP and Tourism Research Australia.

In January 2014, estimates were revised back to July 2004 due to improved methodology used in the Overseas Arrivals and Departures system. For further information, see http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs @.nsf/Lookup/3401.0main+features2 Jan%202014

Related statistics in this bulletin  7.1 Population

 7.2 Components of population change

Related publications  ABS, Australian demographic statistics, Cat. no. 3101.0

 ABS, Migration, Cat. no. 3412.0

 Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC), Population flows

 DIAC, Immigration update

 Tourism Research Australia, International visitor survey

Monthly statistical bulletin

38

7.4 Health—bulk billing and private health insurance

Quarter 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-145

General practice bulk billing rate - per cent (a)

September 79.8 80.7 81.7 82.8 84.0

December 79.8 80.9 82.0 83.1 84.2

March 80.2 81.2 82.4 83.6 84.0

June 80.9 82.0 82.8 84.1

Annual 80.2 81.2 82.2 83.4

Private health insurance hospital coverage rate - per cent

September 45.5 46.2 46.7 47.0 47.3

December 45.6 46.2 46.7 47.0 47.2

March 45.7 46.2 46.7 47.0

June 45.9 46.6 46.9 47.2

(a) Out of hospital services only

Sources:

Department of Health, Medicare statistics online

Private Health Insurance Administration Council, Membership statistics online

Update

August 2015 for bulk billing data

May 2015 for health insurance data

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Per cent Per cent

GP bulk billing rate (left axis) PHI Hospital Coverage - Aust (right axis)

What is measured? The general practice (GP) bulk billing rate is the percentage of all non-referred GP attendances (excluding practice nurse items) that are bulk billed. Bulk billing is a payment option under Medicare where the health service provider is paid 85 per cent of the scheduled fee directly by the government. The patient does not incur any out-of-pocket payment for a bulk billed service.

A range of other Medicare data is available online from the Department of Health and Ageing, such as bulk billing rates for other medical services and the average patient contribution per service.

The private health insurance hospital coverage rate is the proportion of the population who have hospital cover private health insurance. People with hospital cover are eligible for the Private Health Insurance Rebate (also known as the Federal Government 30 per cent Rebate) and do not have to pay the Medicare Levy Surcharge (payable by people earning above a certain income who do not have hospital cover).

Other data available includes the amount of benefits paid; state level data is also available.

Related publications  Private Health Insurance Administration Council, Operations of the private health insurers:

annual report

Monthly statistical bulletin

39

8.1 Economic growth

S

Quarters (a) (b)

Annual average (c) (d) 2013 2014

Country 2011 2012 2013 2014 Mar Jun Sep Dec

Australia 2.6 3.7 2.0 2.7 3.0 2.7 2.7 2.5

Brazil 3.9 1.8 2.7 0.1 1.8 -0.8 -0.2 0.3

Canada 3.0 1.9 2.0 2.5 2.1 2.6 2.7 2.6

China 9.4 7.8 7.7 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.3 7.3

France 2.1 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.8 0.0 0.4 0.2

Germany 3.6 0.4 0.1 1.6 2.3 1.4 1.2 1.5

Indonesia 6.2 6.0 5.6 5.0 5.2 5.0 5.0 4.9

India 7.9 4.9 6.4 7.2 5.7 5.9 5.9 7.5

Italy 0.6 -2.8 -1.7 -0.4 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 -0.3

Japan -0.5 1.8 1.6 0.0 2.2 -0.4 -1.3 -0.4

Korea 3.7 2.3 2.9 3.3 4.0 3.5 3.3 2.8

New Zealand 1.8 2.4 2.3 3.3 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.5

Russia 4.3 3.4 1.3 0.6 1.1 0.9 0.6 0.1

South Africa 3.2 2.2 2.2 1.5 2.1 1.3 1.5 1.3

United Kingdom 1.6 0.7 1.7 2.8 2.5 2.6 2.5 2.7

United States 1.6 2.3 2.2 2.4 1.9 2.6 2.7 2.4

G7 average 1.6 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.6

EU average 1.7 -0.5 0.0 1.3 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.3

OECD Average 1.9 1.3 1.4 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.8

(b) Seasonally adjusted, except for China.

(c) Percentage change in gross domestic product at constant prices over previous year.

(d) Years shown are calendar years. Source: IMF WEO

Source: OECD, IMF World Economic Database

Update

July 2015

(a) Percentage change in gross domestic product at constant prices over

corresponding quarter in previous year. Source: OECD iLibrary

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

Jun 10 Jun 11 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 14 Jun 15

Per cent

Australia EU average OECD Average

What is measured? Economic growth is measured using estimates of the gross domestic product (GDP) of an economy. GDP is equal to an economy’s total output of goods and services less inputs, used in the production of those goods services, but before allowing for depreciation.

GDP statistics are published in current prices and constant prices, i.e. adjusted for the effects of inflation. It is the GDP at constant prices data that is used to show economic growth. This is also known as real growth.

The data shown here is from estimates of GDP compiled following international standards.

Related statistics in this bulletin  3.1 Gross domestic product

 3.2 Non-farm gross domestic product

 8.2 Consumer prices

 8.3 Unemployment rates

 8.4 Short-term interest rates

Related publications  OECD, Economic outlook

 IMF, International financial statistics

 IMF, World economic outlook

Monthly statistical bulletin

40

8.2 Consumer prices

Months (a)

Annually (a) (b) 2014

Country 2011 2012 2013 2014 Jan Feb Mar Apr

Australia (c) 3.3 1.8 2.4 2.5 1.3

Brazil 6.6 5.4 6.2 6.3 7.1 7.7 8.1 8.2

Canada 2.9 1.5 0.9 1.9 1.0 1.0 1.2 0.8

China 5.4 2.6 2.6 2.0 0.8 1.4 1.4 1.5

France 2.1 2.0 0.9 0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.1 0.1

Germany 2.1 2.0 1.5 0.9 -0.4 0.1 0.3 0.5

Indonesia 5.4 4.3 6.4 6.4 7.2 6.3 6.3 5.8

India 8.9 9.3 10.9 6.4 7.0 6.3 6.4 6.8

Italy 2.8 3.0 1.2 0.2 -0.6 -0.1 -0.1 -0.1

Japan -0.3 0.0 0.4 2.7 2.4 2.2 2.3 0.6

Korea 4.0 2.2 1.3 1.3 0.8 0.5 0.4 0.4

New Zealand (c) 4.0 1.1 1.1 1.2 0.1

Russian Federation 8.4 5.1 6.8 7.8 15.0 16.7 16.9 16.4

South Africa 5.0 5.7 5.8 6.1 4.4 4.0 4.0 4.5

United Kingdom 4.5 2.8 2.6 1.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 -0.1

United States 3.2 2.1 1.5 1.6 -0.1 0.0 -0.1 -0.2

G7 2.6 1.9 1.3 1.6 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.0

OECD - Europe 3.2 2.9 1.9 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.6

OECD - Total 2.9 2.2 1.6 1.7 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.4

(a) Percentage change in consumer price indexes over previous year. (b) Years shown are calendar years. (c) Data only available quarterly.

Source: OECD iLibrary, ABS, Consumer Price Index , Cat. no. 6401.0

Update

July 2015

0

1

2

3

4

Jun-2010 Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-14 Jun-15

Per cent

OECD - Europe OECD - Total Australia

What is measured? A consumer price index (CPI) is used to measure price inflation for households. The goods and services purchased by households are combined into a basket that reflects their consumption patterns. From time to time the basket is reviewed to take into account changes in consumption patterns. The data in this bulletin shows the changes in the overall prices of baskets of goods and services in the various countries. Most countries conduct surveys on a monthly basis, however Australia and New Zealand conduct quarterly surveys.

Related statistics in this bulletin  2.4 Consumer price index  8.1 Economic growth  8.3 Unemployment rates  8.4 Short term interest rates

Related publications  OECD, Economic outlook  IMF, International financial statistics

Monthly statistical bulletin

41

8.3 Unemployment rates

Months (a)

Annual average (a) (b) 2014

Country 2011 2012 2013 2014 Nov Dec Jan Feb

Australia 5.1 5.2 5.7 6.1 6.2 6.1 6.4 6.3 OECD

Canada 7.5 7.2 7.1 6.9 6.6 6.7 6.6 6.8

France 9.2 9.8 10.3 10.2 10.3 10.5 10.6 10.6

Germany 6.0 5.5 5.3 5.0 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.8

Italy 8.4 10.7 12.2 12.7 13.4 12.7 12.6 12.7

Japan 4.6 4.4 4.0 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.5

Korea 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.9

New Zealand (c) 6.5 6.9 6.2 5.7 5.7

United Kingdom 8.0 7.9 7.5 6.2 5.6 5.5

United States 9.0 8.1 7.4 6.2 5.8 5.6 5.7 5.5

EU Average 9.6 10.5 10.8 10.2 10.0 9.9 9.9 9.8

G7 Average 7.6 7.4 7.1 6.4 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0

OECD Average 7.9 7.9 7.9 7.3 7.2 7.0 7.1 7.0

(a) Unemployment as a percentage of labour force. (b) Years shown are calendar years. (c) Data only available quarterly. (d) Monthly data seasonally adjusted

Note: Unemployment rates shown above have been adjusted as necessary by the OECD to conform to international definitions and to ensure consistency over time.

Source: OECD, iLibrary; Statistics NZ

Update

July 2015

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Jun-2011 Jun-2012 Jun-2013 Jun-2014 Jun-2015

Per cent

Australia

OECD Average

EU Average

What is measured? The unemployment rate records the number of persons aged 15 and over who are not employed and who have been actively looking for work as a proportion of the labour force. The labour force consists of those persons in employment and those persons who are unemployed.

The data are drawn from monthly labour force surveys in all the countries presented, except for New Zealand, where the survey is conducted on a quarterly basis.

For comparative purposes the OECD standardises national data using international conventions.

Related statistics in this bulletin  1.3 Labour Force

 8.1 Economic growth

 8.2 Consumer prices

 8.4 Short-term interest rates

Related publications  OECD, Economic outlook

 OECD, Main economic indicators

 IMF, International financial statistics

Monthly statistical bulletin

42

8.4 Long-term interest rates

Quarters (c)

2014

Country 2011 2012 2013 2014 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1

Australia 4.9 3.4 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.2 2.5

Canada 2.8 1.9 2.3 2.2 2.4 2.1 2.0 1.4

China 3.9 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.3 4.2 3.8 3.5

Eurozone 4.4 3.9 3.0 2.0 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.0

France 3.3 2.5 2.2 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.1 0.6

Germany 2.7 1.6 1.6 1.2 1.4 1.1 0.8 0.4

India 8.3 8.3 8.1 8.6 8.8 8.6 8.1 7.7

Italy 5.4 5.5 4.3 2.9 3.0 2.6 2.2 1.5

Japan 1.1 0.9 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3

United Kingdom 3.1 1.9 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.6 2.1 1.7

United States 2.8 1.8 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.0

Comparable data for Australia not available prior to August 2011

(a) 10 year government bond. (b) Years shown are calendar years. (c) Quarterly average.

Source: Oxford Economics

Update

July 2014

Annual average (a) (b)

What is measured? The interest rates shown in this table are the average yield on 10-year Government bonds for the period indicated.

The movements in these long-term rates are a useful indicator of the financing costs faced by governments in raising new long-term government debt.

Related statistics in this bulletin  5.1 Business interest rates

 5.2 Housing and cash interest rates

 6.4 Exchange rates

 8.2 Consumer prices

Related publications  OECD, Economic outlook

 OECD, Main economic indicators

 IMF, International financial statistics

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

Jan 11 Jan 12 Jan 13 Jan 14 Jan 15

Per cent

Australia Eurozone United States

Monthly statistical bulletin

43

Related publications—links

Links to the electronic version of related publications referred to in the bulletin are listed below:

ABS, Retail Trade, Australia, Cat. No. 8501.0

ABS, Australian labour market statistics, Cat. no. 6105.0

Melbourne Institute, Monthly bulletin of economic trends

ABS, Job vacancies, Cat. no. 6354.0

ABS, Employee earnings, benefits and trade union membership, Cat. no. 6310.0

ABS, Employee earnings and hours, Cat. no. 6306.0

ABS, Labour price index, Cat. no. 6345.0

ABS, Australian national accounts: national income, expenditure and product, Cat. no. 5206.0

ABS, Average weekly earnings, Cat. no. 6302.0

Melbourne Institute, Survey of consumer inflationary expectations

ABS, A guide to the consumer price index, Cat. no. 6440.0

ABS, Consumer price index: concepts, sources and methods, Cat. no. 6461.0

ABS, Consumer price index, Cat. no. 6401.0

RBA, Bulletin

Treasury, Budget papers

Treasury, Mid-year economic and fiscal outlook 2011-12

OECD, Economic outlook

NAB, Australian outlook and research

Deloitte Access Economics, Business outlook

Investment and Financial Services Association, Australia’s national savings revisited, August 2007

Westpac - Melbourne Institute, Survey of consumer sentiment

NAB, Monthly business survey

FCAI, Vehicle sales

ABS, Motor vehicle census, Cat. no. 9309.0

ABS, Survey of motor vehicle use, Cat. no. 9208.0

ABS, Engineering construction activity, Cat. no. 8762.0

ABS, Construction work done, Cat. no. 8755.0

ABS, Dwelling unit commencements, Cat. no. 8750.0

ABS, Building activity, Cat. no. 8752.0

Tony Kryger, ‘State economic and social indicators’, Research paper, no. 14, Parliamentary Library, 2007-08

RBA, ‘Domestic financial markets and conditions’, Statement on monetary policy

Adrian Makeham-Kirchner, ‘Home loan interest rates and repayments’, Background note, Parliamentary Library, 2007-08

RBA, Financial stability review

RBA, Statement on monetary policy

ABS, Lending finance, Cat. no. 5671.0

ABS, Assets and liabilities of Australian securitisers, Cat. no. 5232.0.55.001

RBA, ‘Loan approvals, repayments and housing credit growth’, Bulletin, July 2007

REIA and Deposit Power, Housing affordability report

HIA - Commonwealth Bank, Affordability report

Australian Securities Exchange, S&P/ASX index overviews

ABS, Australian historical population statistics, Cat. no. 3105.0.65.001

ABS, Population projections, Cat. no. 3222.0

ABS, Population by Age by Sex, Regions of Australia, Cat. no. 3235.0

ABS, Migration, Cat. no. 3412.0

ABS, Births, Cat. no. 3301.0

ABS, Deaths, Cat. no. 3302.0

Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC), Population flows

DIAC, Immigration update

ABS, Australian demographic statistics, Cat. no. 3101.0

Tourism Research Australia, International visitor survey

Private Health Insurance Administration Council, Operations of the private health insurers: annual report

IMF, International financial statistics

IMF, World economic outlook

OECD, Main economic indicators

Monthly statistical bulletin

44

Glossary

average weekly earnings. Average gross (before tax) earnings of employees.

average weekly ordinary time earnings. Weekly earnings attributed to award, standard or agreed hours of work.

balance on current account. The difference between receipts and payments as the result of transactions in goods, services, income and current transfers between Australia and the rest of the world. A current account deficit means that total payments exceed total receipts, while a current account surplus means the reverse.

bankruptcies. Bankruptcies and Administration Orders under Parts IV and XI of the Bankruptcy Act.

business investment. Private gross fixed capital formation for machinery and equipment; non-dwelling construction; livestock; and intangible fixed assets.

cash market rate (interbank overnight). Weighted average of the interest rates at which banks have borrowed and lent exchange settlement funds during the day.

consumer price index. A measure of change in the price of a basket of goods and services from a base period. Changes in the consumer price index are the most commonly used measure of inflation.

employed persons. Persons aged 15 and over who, during a period of one week, worked for one hour or more for pay or worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a family farm.

general practice bulk billing rate. The percentage of general practitioner attendances (excluding practice nurse) that are bulk billed.

gross domestic product. The total market value of goods and services produced after deducting the cost of goods and services used up in the process of production but before deducting for depreciation.

gross domestic product—chain volume measures. Also known as real GDP, this is a measure used to indicate change in the actual quantity of goods and services produced. Economic growth is defined as a situation in which real GDP is rising.

gross foreign debt. All non-equity financial claims by non-residents on residents of Australia. The major component of gross foreign debt is the amount of borrowings from non-residents by residents of Australia.

household debt ratio. The amount of household debt at the end of a quarter expressed as a proportion of annual household gross disposable income. Household debt is the sum of housing and other personal debt, including securitised debt. Debt excludes debt owed by unincorporated enterprises.

household debt servicing ratio. Interest payments on housing and other personal debt expressed as a proportion of household gross disposable income.

household gross disposable income. The amount of income that households have available for spending after deducting any taxes paid, interest payments and transfers overseas.

household net disposable income. Household gross disposable income less depreciation of household capital assets.

household saving ratio. The ratio of household income saved to household net disposable income.

housing loan interest rate. The variable rate quoted by banks for loans to owner-occupiers.

implicit price deflator for non-farm gross domestic product. A measure of price change that is derived (hence the term implicit) by dividing gross non-farm product at current prices by gross non-farm product at chain volume measures.

labour force. The employed plus the unemployed.

labour force participation rate. The number of persons in the labour force expressed as a percentage of the civilian population aged 15 years and over.

labour productivity. Gross domestic product (chain volume measures) per hour worked in the market sector.

long-term unemployed. Persons unemployed for a period of 52 weeks or more.

male total average weekly earnings. Weekly ordinary time earnings plus weekly overtime earnings of all male employees. This measure of earnings is used in the process of benchmarking age pensions.

market sector. All industries excluding those (five) industries whose outputs are not marketed. These excluded industries are: property and business services; government administration and defence; education; health and community services; and personal and other services.

Monthly statistical bulletin

45

natural increase. Excess of live births over deaths.

net foreign debt. Gross foreign debt less non-equity assets such as foreign reserves held by the Reserve Bank of Australia and lending by residents of Australia to non-residents.

net overseas migration. Net permanent and long-term overseas migration plus an adjustment for the net effect of ‘category jumping’.

non-farm gross domestic product. Gross domestic product less that part which derives from agricultural production and services to agriculture.

overseas visitors. Visitors from overseas who intend to stay in Australia for less than 12 months.

private health insurance hospital coverage rate. The percentage of the total population that has private health insurance hospital coverage.

profits share. Gross operating surplus (the excess of gross output over costs incurred in producing that output) of all financial and non-financial corporate trading enterprises as a percentage of total factor income.

real average weekly earnings. Average weekly earnings adjusted for inflation as measured by the consumer price index.

seasonally adjusted estimates. Estimates in which the element of variability due to seasonal influences has been removed. Seasonal influences are those recur regularly each a year.

settlers. Travellers who hold migrant visas, New Zealand citizens who indicate an intention to settle and those who are otherwise eligible to settle.

terms of trade. The relationship between the prices of exports and the prices of imports. The usual method of calculating the terms of trade is to divide the implicit price deflator for exports by the implicit price deflator for imports.

total factor income. Gross domestic product at market prices less the difference between taxes and subsidies, or the sum of compensation of employees, gross operating surplus and gross mixed income.

trade weighted index. A measure of the value of the Australian dollar against a basket of the foreign currencies of Australia’s major trading partners.

trimmed mean. Measures a weighted average of the middle 70 per cent of quarterly price changes in CPI classes reported by the ABS. In effect the 90 CPI classes which make up the CPI are ranked in terms of their quarterly percentage changes and the classes which account for the top and bottom 15 per cent of the distribution are excluded, or ‘trimmed’. This is one method of statistical manipulation of the consumer price survey results to exclude extreme price fluctuations from the CPI survey, in order to determine a trend rate of inflation.

turnover. Includes retail sales; wholesale sales; takings from repairs, meals and hiring of goods; commissions from agency activity; and net takings from gaming machines. From July 2000, turnover includes the Goods and Services Tax.

unemployed persons. Persons aged 15 and over who, during a period of one week, were not employed but had actively looked for work in the previous four weeks and were available to start work.

unemployment rate. The number of unemployed persons expressed as a percentage of the labour force.

wage price index. A measure of change in the price of labour (i.e. wages, salaries and overtime) unaffected by changes in the quality or quantity of work performed.

wages share. Compensation of employees (the total value of income from labour) as a percentage of total factor income.

weighted median. Measures the price change that is the median, or midpoint, price change of the distribution of price changes within the CPI survey. That is, all but the middle observation from the 90 classes within the CPI are excluded. This is one method of statistical manipulation of the consumer price survey results to exclude an array of volatile price fluctuations in order to determine a trend rate of inflation.

youth unemployment. Number of 15-19 year olds looking for full-time work.

youth unemployment rate. Number of 15-19 year olds looking for full-time work expressed as a percentage of the full-time labour force in the same age group.

Monthly statistical bulletin

46

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